Fermented Foods and Their Health Benefits

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 17409

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fermented foods and beverages are gaining great attention due to their natural, nutritional, and functional utility for the promotion of health. Fermented foods are rich in probiotic bacteria, and their consumption enriches the pool of beneficial bacteria and enzymes in the intestine, thereby increasing the health of gut microbiome and digestive system and enhancing the immune system. The human gastrointestinal tract harbors a diverse array of microorganisms that play fundamental roles in health and disease. An imbalance in the gut microbiota, namely, dysbiosis, can lead to various diseases, including cancer and gastrointestinal tract disorders. Approaches to improve gut dysbiosis, such as dietary interventions, intake of probiotics, and fecal microbiota transplantation, are emerging strategies to treat these diseases. On a similar note, various studies have reported that fermented food are probiotic-rich with potential health benefits. On the contrary, raw or plant-based food are often considered tough to digest because they require a diverse microbiota in the gut, which may be lacking. It is thus believed that fermented food is better than the corresponding raw food. The original inoculum used to ferment a foodstuff influences the bioactivity of resulting fermented foods. Fermented foods provide more nutrients than raw materials. Various scientific reports claim that fermented foods have anti-cancer and/or anti-inflammatory properties. Preclinical studies have illustrated that some fermented products are also capable to modulate the gut microbiota, suggesting their use as a possible means to improve gut dysbiosis and thereby assist diseases treatment. Fermented food can also eliminate anti-nutrients that interfere with the absorption of nutrients. These observations emphasize the need to study the effect of fresh produce and fermented products in relation to gut microbiota diversity to better take advantage of their health benefits.

Dr. Kavita Sharma
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • fermentation
  • microbiota
  • inoculum
  • immune system
  • health
  • probiotics
  • dietary fiber
  • bioactivity
  • nutrients
  • enzymes

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 25545 KiB  
Article
Protection against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis by Fermented Sea Tangle (Laminaria japonica Aresch) in Osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 Cells through Activation of Nrf2 Signaling Pathway
by So Young Kim, Hee-Jae Cha, Hyun Hwangbo, Cheol Park, Hyesook Lee, Kyoung Seob Song, Jung-Hyun Shim, Jeong Sook Noh, Heui-Soo Kim, Bae-Jin Lee, Suhkmann Kim, Gi-Young Kim, You-Jin Jeon and Yung Hyun Choi
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2807; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112807 - 15 Nov 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2416
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to explore the efficacy of fermented extract of sea tangle (Laminaria japonica Aresch, FST) with Lactobacillus brevis on DNA damage and apoptosis in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-stimulated osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and clarify [...] Read more.
The purpose of the present study was to explore the efficacy of fermented extract of sea tangle (Laminaria japonica Aresch, FST) with Lactobacillus brevis on DNA damage and apoptosis in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-stimulated osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and clarify related signaling pathways. Our results showed that exposure to FST significantly improved cell viability, inhibited apoptosis, and suppressed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in H2O2-stimulated cells. In addition, H2O2 triggered DNA damage in MC3T3-E1 cells was markedly attenuated by FST pretreatment. Moreover, H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with apoptotic events, including loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), decreased Bcl-2/Bcl-2 associated x-protein (Bax) ratio, and cytosolic release of cytochrome c, were reduced in the presence of FST. FST also diminished H2O2-induced activation of caspase-3, which was associated with the ability of FST to protect the degradation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Furthermore, FST notably enhanced nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the presence of H2O2 with concomitant upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. However, artificial blockade of this pathway by the HO-1 inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin IX, greatly abolished the protective effect of FST against H2O2-induced MC3T3-E1 cell injury. Taken together, these results demonstrate that FST could protect MC3T3-E1 cells from H2O2-induced damage by maintaining mitochondrial function while eliminating ROS along with activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermented Foods and Their Health Benefits)
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14 pages, 1770 KiB  
Article
Prebiotic Effect of Maitake Extract on a Probiotic Consortium and Its Action after Microbial Fermentation on Colorectal Cell Lines
by Alessandra De Giani, Federica Bovio, Matilde Emma Forcella, Marina Lasagni, Paola Fusi and Patrizia Di Gennaro
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2536; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112536 - 21 Oct 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2542
Abstract
Maitake (Grifola frondosa) is a medicinal mushroom known for its peculiar biological activities due to the presence of functional components, including dietary fibers and glucans, that can improve human health through the modulation of the gut microbiota. In this paper, a [...] Read more.
Maitake (Grifola frondosa) is a medicinal mushroom known for its peculiar biological activities due to the presence of functional components, including dietary fibers and glucans, that can improve human health through the modulation of the gut microbiota. In this paper, a Maitake ethanol/water extract was prepared and characterized through enzymatic and chemical assays. The prebiotic potential of the extract was evaluated by the growth of some probiotic strains and of a selected probiotic consortium. The results revealed the prebiotic properties due to the stimulation of the growth of the probiotic strains, also in consortium, leading to the production of SCFAs, including lactic, succinic, and valeric acid analyzed via GC-MSD. Then, their beneficials effect were employed in evaluating the vitality of three different healthy and tumoral colorectal cell lines (CCD841, CACO-2, and HT-29) and the viability rescue after co-exposure to different stressor agents and the probiotic consortium secondary metabolites. These metabolites exerted positive effects on colorectal cell lines, in particular in protection from reactive oxygen species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermented Foods and Their Health Benefits)
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Review

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22 pages, 634 KiB  
Review
Eating Fermented: Health Benefits of LAB-Fermented Foods
by Vincenzo Castellone, Elena Bancalari, Josep Rubert, Monica Gatti, Erasmo Neviani and Benedetta Bottari
Foods 2021, 10(11), 2639; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10112639 - 31 Oct 2021
Cited by 58 | Viewed by 11678
Abstract
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are involved in producing a considerable number of fermented products consumed worldwide. Many of those LAB fermented foods are recognized as beneficial for human health due to probiotic LAB or their metabolites produced during food fermentation or after food [...] Read more.
Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are involved in producing a considerable number of fermented products consumed worldwide. Many of those LAB fermented foods are recognized as beneficial for human health due to probiotic LAB or their metabolites produced during food fermentation or after food digestion. In this review, we aim to gather and discuss available information on the health-related effects of LAB-fermented foods. In particular, we focused on the most widely consumed LAB-fermented foods such as yoghurt, kefir, cheese, and plant-based products such as sauerkrauts and kimchi. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermented Foods and Their Health Benefits)
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