Plant-Based Alternatives to Dairy Foods: Challenges and Trends

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2023) | Viewed by 12725

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
AgroFood Technology Department, Escuela Politécnica Superior de Orihuela, Miguel Hernández University, Orihuela, Spain
Interests: dairy foods; functional dairy products: probiotics, prebiotics and fibers; effect of animal feeding on milk quality and properties; foods of animal origin; quality and product development and improvement; fatty acid analysis of foods; gas chromatography
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Guest Editor
Research Group “Food Quality and Safety”, Centro de Investigación e Innovación Agroalimentaria y Agroambiental (CIAGRO-UMH), Miguel Hernández University, Carretera de Beniel, Km 3.2, 03312 Orihuela, Spain
Interests: nuts; tropical fruits; water stress; stress markers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant-based foods are getting increasingly popular, consumer demand is on the rise and food companies are designing new food formulations, many of them imitating traditional dairy foods that consumers include in their diet substituting the original dairy ones. The usual raw materials for such products are nuts, cereals, legumes, and even tubers. However, the nutritional profile of plant-based foods largely differs from that of dairy foods, in addition, the texture, stability and clotting properties of vegetable proteins are also different than those of milk, and consequently sensory properties. In the present Special Issue, we would like to invite contributions able to provide scientific knowledge to face the challenges of vegetable raw materials, mainly those related to product nutritional, technological, functional and sensory properties and also to describe the present and future trends in the development of plant-based dairy alternatives.

Dr. Esther Sendra
Dr. Leontina Lipan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • almond
  • nuts
  • dairy-alternatives
  • cereal foods
  • fermentation
  • plant protein
  • prebiotics
  • probiotics
  • non-dairy foods
  • veganism
  • cheese-analogues

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 2984 KiB  
Article
Formulation and Physical Stability of High Total Solids Lentil Protein-Stabilised Emulsions for Use in Plant Protein-Based Young Child Formulae
by Nicolas Malterre, Francesca Bot and James A. O’Mahony
Foods 2023, 12(9), 1741; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12091741 - 22 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1507
Abstract
The demand for high-quality plant protein products is increasing and the aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of increasing the total solids content on the formation and stability of lentil protein stabilised oil-in-water emulsions. A series of emulsions were formulated [...] Read more.
The demand for high-quality plant protein products is increasing and the aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of increasing the total solids content on the formation and stability of lentil protein stabilised oil-in-water emulsions. A series of emulsions were formulated using different proportions of total solids: 23, 26, 29, 32, and 35% (w/v). The emulsions were formulated using three ingredients—lentil protein, sunflower oil, and maltodextrin—which made up 15.85, 27.43, and 56.72% (w/w) of the total solids, respectively. The changes in apparent viscosity, particle size distribution, and colour during thermal processing were evaluated, with the physical stability investigated using an analytical centrifuge. The apparent viscosity of the solutions increased with total solids content (25.6 to 130 mPa.s−1), as did redness colour intensity (a* value increased from 5.82 ± 0.12 to 7.70 ± 0.09). Thermal processing resulted in greater destabilisation for higher total solids samples, as evidenced by greater changes in particle size, along with decreased redness colour. These results bring a better understanding of high total solids plant protein emulsions and factors affecting their stability, which could be used for the development of cost-effective and sustainable processing solutions in the production of plant protein young child formulae. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Alternatives to Dairy Foods: Challenges and Trends)
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13 pages, 3640 KiB  
Article
Plant-Based Alternatives to Cheese Formulated Using Blends of Zein and Chickpea Protein Ingredients
by Nadia Grasso, Francesca Bot, Yrjo H. Roos, Shane V. Crowley, Elke K. Arendt and James A. O’Mahony
Foods 2023, 12(7), 1492; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12071492 - 01 Apr 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4156
Abstract
In this study, zein protein isolate (ZPI) and chickpea protein concentrate (CPC) ingredients were used to formulate five plant-based cheese alternatives. Ingredient ratios based on protein contributions of 0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25 and 100:0 from ZPI and CPC, respectively, were used. Formulations were [...] Read more.
In this study, zein protein isolate (ZPI) and chickpea protein concentrate (CPC) ingredients were used to formulate five plant-based cheese alternatives. Ingredient ratios based on protein contributions of 0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25 and 100:0 from ZPI and CPC, respectively, were used. Formulations were developed at pH ~4.5, with a moisture target of 59%. Shea butter was used to target 15% fat, while tapioca starch was added to target the same carbohydrate content for all samples. Microstructural analysis showed differences among samples, with samples containing ZPI displaying a protein-rich layer surrounding the fat globules. Schreiber meltability and dynamic low amplitude oscillatory shear rheological analyses showed that increasing the proportion of ZPI was associated with increasing meltability and greater ability to flow at high temperatures. In addition, the sample containing only CPC showed the highest adhesiveness, springiness and cohesiveness values from the texture profile analysis, while the sample containing only ZPI exhibited the highest hardness. Furthermore, stretchability increased with increasing ZPI proportions. This work will help understanding of the role and potential of promising plant-protein-ingredient blends in formulating plant-based alternatives to cheese with desirable functional properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Alternatives to Dairy Foods: Challenges and Trends)
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Review

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33 pages, 1404 KiB  
Review
Plant-Based Dairy Alternatives—A Future Direction to the Milky Way
by Diana Plamada, Bernadette-Emőke Teleky, Silvia Amalia Nemes, Laura Mitrea, Katalin Szabo, Lavinia-Florina Călinoiu, Mihaela Stefana Pascuta, Rodica-Anita Varvara, Călina Ciont, Gheorghe Adrian Martău, Elemer Simon, Gabriel Barta, Francisc Vasile Dulf, Dan Cristian Vodnar and Maria Nitescu
Foods 2023, 12(9), 1883; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12091883 - 03 May 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 6230
Abstract
One significant food group that is part of our daily diet is the dairy group, and both research and industry are actively involved to meet the increasing requirement for plant-based dairy alternatives (PBDAs). The production tendency of PBDAs is growing with a predictable [...] Read more.
One significant food group that is part of our daily diet is the dairy group, and both research and industry are actively involved to meet the increasing requirement for plant-based dairy alternatives (PBDAs). The production tendency of PBDAs is growing with a predictable rate of over 18.5% in 2023 from 7.4% at the moment. A multitude of sources can be used for development such as cereals, pseudocereals, legumes, nuts, and seeds to obtain food products such as vegetal milk, cheese, cream, yogurt, butter, and different sweets, such as ice cream, which have nearly similar nutritional profiles to those of animal-origin products. Increased interest in PBDAs is manifested in groups with special dietary needs (e.g., lactose intolerant individuals, pregnant women, newborns, and the elderly) or with pathologies such as metabolic syndromes, dermatological diseases, and arthritis. In spite of the vast range of production perspectives, certain industrial challenges arise during development, such as processing and preservation technologies. This paper aims at providing an overview of the currently available PBDAs based on recent studies selected from the electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science Core Collection, and Scopus. We found 148 publications regarding PBDAs in correlation with their nutritional and technological aspects, together with the implications in terms of health. Therefore, this review focuses on the relationship between plant-based alternatives for dairy products and the human diet, from the raw material to the final products, including the industrial processes and health-related concerns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant-Based Alternatives to Dairy Foods: Challenges and Trends)
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