Advances in Cultured Meat Science and Technology

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1124

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Biotechnology of Animal Resources, Konkuk University, Seoul 05029, Republic of Korea
Interests: meat science; meat product; meat analog; cultivated meat; milk science; dairy products; toxicology; functional foods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the face of a growing global population, securing a reliable protein supply becomes increasingly crucial. While plant-based protein sources are abundant, animal meat remains a preferred, high-quality protein option. The emergence of cultured meat, also known as in vitro meat, represents a promising avenue in meat analog production through cell culture technology. This innovation may bring benefits such as environmental sustainability, disease prevention and enhanced animal welfare. Although still an emerging technology, the commercialization of cultured meat is underway, with its inevitable integration into our diets on the horizon.

This Special Issue provides a platform for research and review papers, exploring recent advances in cultured meat science and technology. Contributions highlight core areas, including scaffold engineering, stem cell utilization, and novel approaches to cell proliferation and differentiation. The papers also include progress in cell culture media, antibiotic alternatives and FBS replacers. As the world pivots toward sustainable and ethical food production, this Special Issue serves as a comprehensive guide to the latest breakthroughs in cultured meat, offering crucial insights for researchers, industry professionals and policymakers navigating this transformative field.

Prof. Dr. Sung Gu Han
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cultured meat
  • in vitro meat
  • meat analog
  • cell culture technology
  • scaffold
  • sustainability
  • muscle satellite cell
  • stem cell

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 2448 KiB  
Article
Production of Plant-Based, Film-Type Scaffolds Using Alginate and Corn Starch for the Culture of Bovine Myoblasts
by Jun-Yeong Lee, Jihad Kamel, Chandra-Jit Yadav, Usha Yadav, Sadia Afrin, Yu-Mi Son, So-Yeon Won, Sung-Soo Han and Kyung-Mee Park
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1358; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091358 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 938
Abstract
Natural scaffolds have been the cornerstone of tissue engineering for decades, providing ideal environments for cell growth within extracellular matrices. Previous studies have favored animal-derived materials, including collagen, gelatin, and laminin, owing to their superior effects in promoting cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation [...] Read more.
Natural scaffolds have been the cornerstone of tissue engineering for decades, providing ideal environments for cell growth within extracellular matrices. Previous studies have favored animal-derived materials, including collagen, gelatin, and laminin, owing to their superior effects in promoting cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation compared to non-animal scaffolds, and used immortalized cell lines. However, for cultured meat production, non-animal-derived scaffolds with edible cells are preferred. Our study represents the first research to describe plant-derived, film-type scaffolds to overcome limitations associated with previously reported thick, gel-type scaffolds completely devoid of animal-derived materials. This approach has been employed to address the difficulties of fostering bovine muscle cell survival, migration, and differentiation in three-dimensional co-cultures. Primary bovine myoblasts from Bos Taurus Coreanae were harvested and seeded on alginate (Algi) or corn-derived alginate (AlgiC) scaffolds. Scaffold functionalities, including biocompatibility and the promotion of cell proliferation and differentiation, were evaluated using cell viability assays, immunofluorescence staining, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Our results reveal a statistically significant 71.7% decrease in production time using film-type scaffolds relative to that for gel-type scaffolds, which can be maintained for up to 7 days. Film-type scaffolds enhanced initial cell attachment owing to their flatness and thinness relative to gel-type scaffolds. Algi and AlgiC film-type scaffolds both demonstrated low cytotoxicity over seven days of cell culture. Our findings indicated that PAX7 expression increased 16.5-fold in alginate scaffolds and 22.8-fold in AlgiC from day 1 to day 3. Moreover, at the differentiation stage on day 7, MHC expression was elevated 41.8-fold (Algi) and 32.7-fold (AlgiC), providing initial confirmation of the differentiation potential of bovine muscle cells. These findings suggest that both Algi and AlgiC film scaffolds are advantageous for cultured meat production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cultured Meat Science and Technology)
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