Safety and Microbiological Quality 2.0

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation Process Design".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021) | Viewed by 4534

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
SPO, Univ La Réunion, Univ Montpellier, INRAE, Montpellier SupAgro, Montpellier, France
Interests: fermentation; non-conventional processing; lactic acid bacteria; aquaculture; waste recovery; bioactive compounds; antioxidants
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Guest Editor
CIRAD, UMR QualiSud, 73 rue Jean Francois Breton, F-34398 Montpellier, France
Interests: food safety; hazard analysis; control; mycotoxin; microbiota
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
CIRAD, UMR Qualisud, F-97410 Saint-Pierre, Réunion, France
Interests: lactic acid bacteria; aquaculture; waste recovery; bioactive compounds; antioxidants

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Guest Editor
Qualisud, Univ Montpellier, Avignon Université, CIRAD, Institut Agro, IRD, Université de La Réunion, F-97490 Montpellier, France
Interests: mycotoxin; biological control; fermentation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The primary aim of food fermentation is to increase the shelf life of perishable foodstuffs, with an extremely large diversity of origins.

Safety issues are related to the control of growth and persistence of foodborne pathogens, and to the presence of toxic compounds (e.g., mycotoxins, biogenic amines, ethylcarbamate, or other chemical hazards) formed during fermentation. Moreover, the fermentation of some plant-derived foods aims to decrease the level of toxic molecules like cyanogens and other anti-nutritional factors. This Special Issue will consider manuscripts dealing with the management or control of chemical or microbiological hazards, including HACCP approaches and ferment quality.

In addition, the microbiological quality of fermented foods and beverages is closely connected to sensory or nutritional quality, and may influence the shelf life of resulting products by the control of microbial spoilage, but can also directly influence process reproducibility. Lastly, microbial activity in fermented products can impact the host intestinal microbiota. Hence, this Special Issue will also focus on the management of microorganisms to ensure a high microbiological quality.

Prof. Dr. Fabienne Remize
Dr. Didier Montet
Dr. Jean-Christophe Meile
Dr. Caroline Strub
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Safety
  • Hazard
  • Spoilage
  • Shelf life
  • HACCP
  • Pathogens
  • Toxins

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 2988 KiB  
Article
Towards a Starter Culture for Cocoa Fermentation by the Selection of Acetic Acid Bacteria
by Lucie Farrera, Alexandre Colas de la Noue, Caroline Strub, Benjamin Guibert, Christelle Kouame, Joël Grabulos, Didier Montet and Corinne Teyssier
Fermentation 2021, 7(1), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7010042 - 20 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3749
Abstract
Acetic acid bacteria are involved in many food and beverage fermentation processes. They play an important role in cocoa bean fermentation through their acetic acid production. They initiate the development of some of the flavor precursors that are necessary for the organoleptic quality [...] Read more.
Acetic acid bacteria are involved in many food and beverage fermentation processes. They play an important role in cocoa bean fermentation through their acetic acid production. They initiate the development of some of the flavor precursors that are necessary for the organoleptic quality of cocoa, and for the beans’ color. The development of starter cultures with local strains would enable the preservation of the microbial biodiversity of each country in cocoa-producing areas, and would also control the fermentation. This approach could avoid the standardization of cocoa bean fermentation in the producing countries. One hundred and thirty acetic acid bacteria were isolated from three different cocoa-producing countries, and were identified based on their 16S rRNA gene sequence. The predominate strains were grown in a cocoa pulp simulation medium (CPSM-AAB) in order to compare their physiological traits regarding their specific growth rate, ethanol and lactic acid consumption, acetic acid production, and relative preferences of carbon sources. Finally, the intraspecific diversity of the strains was then assessed through the analysis of their genomic polymorphism by (GTG)5-PCR fingerprinting. Our results showed that Acetobacter pasteurianus was the most recovered species in all of the origins, with 86 isolates out of 130 cultures. A great similarity was observed between the strains according to their physiological characterization and genomic polymorphisms. However, the multi-parametric clustering results in the different groups highlighted some differences in their basic metabolism, such as their efficiency in converting carbon substrates to acetate, and their relative affinity to lactic acid and ethanol. The A. pasteurianus strains showed different behaviors regarding their ability to oxidize ethanol and lactic acid into acetic acid, and in their relative preference for each substrate. The impact of these behaviors on the cocoa quality should be investigated, and should be considered as a criterion for the selection of acetic acid bacteria starters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety and Microbiological Quality 2.0)
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