The Rendering of Traditional Fermented Foods in Human Diet: Distribution of Health Benefits and Nutritional Benefits

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2023) | Viewed by 27311

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Microbiology, Biotechnology and Hygiene, Department of Agricultural Development, Democritus University of Thrace, Orestiada 68200, Greece
Interests: functional foods; fruit juices; probiotics; prebiotics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Forestry, Agricultural and Food Sciences (DiSAFA), Università degli Studi di Torino, Largo Paolo Braccini 2, Grugliasco, 10095 Turin, Italy
Interests: fermentation; biodiversity; functional gut models; lactic acid bacteria; probiotic; microbiota; microbiome; food safety; food microbiology; food science

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Most fermented foods are based on the cultural preferences of different geographical areas and the heterogeneity of tradition where they are produced. For instance, many consumers in Asian countries prefer fermented seafood, while consumers in Europe prefer fermented cereal and dairy food products. Even though the food industry has developed various novel techniques in order to produce novel foods (genetic modification, nanotechnology and other processing techniques), traditional foods still represent a significant section of the food industry, which has recently seemed to show growth. In addition, the progress of various developed analytical techniques has revealed new knowledge which documents and corroborates the certain benefits of traditional foods, mostly regarding their nutritional and health benefits. In this context, the main target of this Special Issue is to deliver new data on how traditional foods exhibit their health-promoting properties and ameliorate nutritional value in fermented food systems. In addition, the involvement of wild starter culture in the production of traditional foods is a subject area that needs to be highlighted.

Dr. Stavros Plessas
Dr. Cristian Botta
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • traditional foods
  • diet
  • health benefits
  • fortification
  • bioactive compounds
  • microorganisms
  • nutritional value

Published Papers (9 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

2 pages, 186 KiB  
Editorial
The Rendering of Traditional Fermented Foods in Human Diet: Distribution of Health Benefits and Nutritional Benefits
by Stavros Plessas
Fermentation 2022, 8(12), 751; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8120751 - 16 Dec 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1401
Abstract
Most fermented foods are based on the cultural preferences of different geographical areas and the heterogeneity of traditions from where they are produced. For instance, many consumers in Asian countries prefer fermented seafood, while consumers in Europe prefer fermented cereal and dairy food [...] Read more.
Most fermented foods are based on the cultural preferences of different geographical areas and the heterogeneity of traditions from where they are produced. For instance, many consumers in Asian countries prefer fermented seafood, while consumers in Europe prefer fermented cereal and dairy food products. Even though the food industry has developed various novel techniques in order to produce novel foods (genetic modification, nanotechnology and other processing techniques), traditional foods still represent a significant proportion of the food industry, which has recently appeared to develop further. In addition, the progress in various developed analytical techniques has revealed new knowledge that documents and corroborates certain benefits of traditional foods, mostly regarding their nutritional and health benefits. In this context, the main target of this Special Issue is to deliver new data on how traditional foods exhibit their health-promoting properties and ameliorate the nutritional value of fermented food systems. In addition, the involvement of wild starter culture in the production of traditional foods is a subject area that must be highlighted. Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

14 pages, 2350 KiB  
Article
Development of Blood Sugar Regulatory Products from Momordica cochininensis via Probiotic Fermentation
by Po-Hua Wu, Huei-Rong Guo, Yi-An Liu, Chien-Hui Wu, Chun-Chen Huang, Jer-An Lin and Chang-Wei Hsieh
Fermentation 2023, 9(6), 578; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9060578 - 18 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1771
Abstract
Type II diabetes is the most important health issue in the whole world. Besides the use of prescribed drugs to control blood glucose level, recently, the development of health supplements is being actively explored. Owing to its high nutritional value, Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng. [...] Read more.
Type II diabetes is the most important health issue in the whole world. Besides the use of prescribed drugs to control blood glucose level, recently, the development of health supplements is being actively explored. Owing to its high nutritional value, Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng. (Gac) is potentially a good source for developing this supplement. In recent years, the aril of Gac has been utilized as a substrate for developing various forms of supplements, but the pulp has been neglected as a byproduct. However, the pulp contains lots of phytochemicals that could provide health benefits, and the investigation using lactobacilli to ferment the pulp juices to lower blood glucose is not yet to be explored. Therefore, we set out to investigate the potential to develop the pulp-based juices for controlling blood glucose level by selecting an optimal strain of lactobacillus to ferment the pulp juice and measuring the inhibitory action of the fermented juice on α-glucosidase. This enzyme is crucial for controlling postprandial glucose absorbed into the bloodstream because it is the enzyme that hydrolyzes the carbohydrates to release glucose. First, we have successfully isolated a strain of lactobacillus which was capable of fermenting the pulp to produce α-glucosidase-inhibitory activity. Through a 16S rRNA sequence, this lactobacillus was named Lactiplantibacillus plantarum GBI 001. The optimal conditions for its growth in commercial culture medium were found to be 35 °C for 16 h to produce the highest α-glucosidase activity (72.03%). The optimal conditions for the strain to grow in Gac pulp juice were: 20% pulp juices as substrate with an initial pH adjusted to 4.0, growing at 35 °C for 16 h. Under these conditions, the fermented juice exhibited α-glucosidase activity of 24.36%, which is a 2.17-fold increase over the control group (11.23%). From its increase in α-glucosidase potency, using L. plantarum GBI 001 to ferment the pulp juices of Gac as soft drinks has great potential to develop a helpful drink as a food supplement to control postprandial blood glucose in patients with diabetes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 5077 KiB  
Article
Fermented (By Monascus purpureus or Aspergillus oryzae) and Non-Fermented Defatted Soybean Flour Extracts: Biological Insight and Mechanism Differences in Inflammatory Pain and Peritonitis
by Marília F. Manchope, Mariana M. Bertozzi, Sergio M. Borghi, Cíntia L. Handa, Mariana A. Queiroz-Cancian, Camila R. Ferraz, Sandra S. Mizokami, Stephanie Badaró-Garcia, Ketlem C. Andrade, Tiago H. Zaninelli, Wilma A. Spinosa, Sandra R. Georgetti, Elza I. Ida, Waldiceu A. Verri and Rubia Casagrande
Fermentation 2023, 9(2), 167; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9020167 - 11 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1725
Abstract
Background: Monascus purpureus and Aspergillus oryzae have been used to ferment defatted soybean flour (DSF: DSFF-Mp and DSSF-Ao, respectively) extract, improving antioxidant availability and conversion of the glycosylated isoflavones to aglycones. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biological activity [...] Read more.
Background: Monascus purpureus and Aspergillus oryzae have been used to ferment defatted soybean flour (DSF: DSFF-Mp and DSSF-Ao, respectively) extract, improving antioxidant availability and conversion of the glycosylated isoflavones to aglycones. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biological activity of fermented and non-fermented DSF extracts in pain and inflammation, which has not yet been explored. Methods: Phenolic compounds of extracts were determined. Non-fermented DSF (DSF-Non), DSFF-Mp, and DSFF-Ao (10–100 mg/kg) were administrated i.p., 30 min before i.pl. or i.p. carrageenan stimulus. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, edema, histopathology, leukocyte recruitment, and oxidative stress in the paw tissue, and inflammatory cell recruitment, NFκB activation, and cytokine production were assessed in the peritoneum. Stomach and kidney toxicity were evaluated. Results: DSF-Non, DSFF-Mp, and DSFF-Ao extracts inhibited mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, histopathology, neutrophil recruitment, and oxidative stress, as well as inhibited peritoneal leukocyte recruitment. DSF-Non increased IL-10, and DSFF-Ao reduced IL-33 levels. DSFF-Mp increased IL-10 and reduced IL-33 production, and NFκB activation in CD45+ cells, without inducing toxicity. Conclusions: The present data reveal for the first time that fermented/non-fermented DSF extracts are analgesic and anti-inflammatory, showing differences in the mechanism of action depending on fungi applied for fermentation. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 2053 KiB  
Article
A Human and Animal Based Study Reveals That a Traditionally Fermented Rice Beverage Alters Gut Microbiota and Fecal Metabolites for Better Gut Health
by Bhuwan Bhaskar, Anupam Bhattacharya, Atanu Adak, Santanu Das and Mojibur R. Khan
Fermentation 2023, 9(2), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9020126 - 28 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2433
Abstract
Fermented rice beverages are consumed globally, especially in Southeast Asia. In India, such beverages are consumed by a substantial population of ethnic communities. In this study, the gut bacterial diversity of rice beverage drinkers from Assam, India (n = 27) was compared with [...] Read more.
Fermented rice beverages are consumed globally, especially in Southeast Asia. In India, such beverages are consumed by a substantial population of ethnic communities. In this study, the gut bacterial diversity of rice beverage drinkers from Assam, India (n = 27) was compared with that of nondrinkers (n = 21) with the next-generation sequencing (NGS) of fecal metagenomic 16S rDNA, which indicated changes in 20 bacterial genera. Further, mice (n = 6, per treatment group) were gavaged daily for 30 days with different fractions of the beverage, which included rice beverage (RB), soluble (SF), and insoluble fractions (IF) to determine the effects of different components of the beverage. A comparison of gut bacteria at two time points, 0 and 30 days of treatments, suggested changes in 48 bacterial genera across the different treatment groups in mice. Major bacterial changes were suggestive of functional components associated with gut health, as observed in both humans and mice. Next, the Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) of mice stool after 30 days of treatments showed a total of 68 metabolites, of which hexadecanoic acid, a flavor component of this beverage, was present in the feces of all mouse treatment groups except controls. These metabolites showed treatmentwise clustering in groups in a partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS–DA) plot. Blood endotoxin levels were lower in all treatment groups in the mice compared to those of the controls. The findings of the study are suggestive of the gut modulatory effects of the beverage on the basis of the observed features of the bacterial changes. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

16 pages, 612 KiB  
Article
Antidiabetic and Hypolipidemic Efficiency of Lactobacillus plantarum Fermented Oat (Avena sativa) Extract in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Rats
by Raya Algonaiman, Hend F. Alharbi and Hassan Barakat
Fermentation 2022, 8(6), 267; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8060267 - 6 Jun 2022
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3308
Abstract
Antidiabetic properties of fermented foods have been previously demonstrated. This study aimed to examine the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic potential activities of L. plantarum fermented oat extract in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Firstly, inoculating 1% of L. plantarum starter culture in 10% whole oat flour [...] Read more.
Antidiabetic properties of fermented foods have been previously demonstrated. This study aimed to examine the antidiabetic and hypolipidemic potential activities of L. plantarum fermented oat extract in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Firstly, inoculating 1% of L. plantarum starter culture in 10% whole oat flour in aqueous media resulted in 8.36 log CFU mL−1 and pH 4.60 after 72 h of fermentation at 37 °C. With time progression of oat fermentation, total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant activity (AOA), and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contents were significantly increased up to 72 h. On the contrary, a significant reduction in β-glucan content was observed only after 72 h of fermentation. Secondly, separated aqueous extracts, i.e., unfermented oat extract (UFOE) and L. plantarum fermented oat extract (LFOE) were examined in vivo in a rat model, which consisted of five groups. Group 1 (negative group, NR); GROUP 2 (positive group, STZ), intraperitoneally injected with a single dose of 45 mg kg−1 BW of Streptozotocin and administered 7 mL of distilled water orally per day; Group 3 (STZ+MET), diabetic rats orally administered 50 mg of metformin kg−1 BW daily; Group 4 (STZ+UFOE), diabetic rats orally administered 7 mL of UFOE daily; and Group 5 (STZ+UFOE), diabetic rats orally administered 7 mL of LFOE daily for 6 weeks. Monitoring random blood glucose (RBG) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) showed that both the UFOE and the LFOE alleviated hyperglycemia in the STZ-induced diabetic rats. The extracts were significantly efficient in improving serum lipid profiles as compared with the positive group. Moreover, liver and kidneys’ functions were improved, and both extracts promoted hepatoprotective and nephroprotective characteristics. Furthermore, the administration of the UFOE and the LFOE efficiently attenuated GSH, CAT, and SOD enzymes and decreased MDA levels as compared with the positive group. In conclusion, data indicate the potential of UFOE and LFOE in future strategies as functional supplements against diabetes and diabetes-related complications. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

11 pages, 627 KiB  
Review
Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Production of Traditional Fermented Foods and Beverages of Latin America
by Angela D. Carboni, Gonçalo N. Martins, Andrea Gómez-Zavaglia and Paula C. Castilho
Fermentation 2023, 9(4), 315; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9040315 - 23 Mar 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3605
Abstract
Traditional fermented foods are inherent to the human diet and represent an important part of the culture of each country. The fermentation process has been traditionally used as a method of food preservation. It allows modifying the technological, sensory, and nutritional attributes of [...] Read more.
Traditional fermented foods are inherent to the human diet and represent an important part of the culture of each country. The fermentation process has been traditionally used as a method of food preservation. It allows modifying the technological, sensory, and nutritional attributes of raw ingredients. Latin America has a vast history with these products, but they are not always known worldwide. One of the most used microorganisms in fermented foods is lactic acid bacteria. This review aims to provide insight into the main attributes, benefits, and nutritional characteristics of traditional fermented foods and beverages from Latin America made with lactic acid bacteria. A bibliography analysis of the general aspects of fermented products from this region was carried out, focusing on the foods and beverages (with and without alcohol), their representation in native communities, nutritional value and effect on health, as well as the risk of their consumption. It is concluded that traditional fermented products of Latin America are usually prepared with specific ingredients of the region (such as cassava and corn), and that the lactic acid bacteria present in these foods are not always identifiable due to the inherent variability of artisanal production. The bacteria observed include Lacticaseibacillus, Lactiplantibacillus, Lactobacillus, Limosilactobacillus, Leuconostoc, Streptococcus, and Weisella, among others. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 5044 KiB  
Review
Glucoregulatory Properties of Fermented Soybean Products
by Songfeng Yu, Wenjun Wang, Shanshan Li, Jiaheng Li, Runan Zhao, Donghong Liu and Jianping Wu
Fermentation 2023, 9(3), 254; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9030254 - 4 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2374
Abstract
Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease, characterized by persistent hyperglycemia, the prevalence of which is on the rise worldwide. Fermented soybean products (FSP) are rich in diverse functional ingredients which have been shown to exhibit therapeutic properties in alleviating hyperglycemia. [...] Read more.
Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease, characterized by persistent hyperglycemia, the prevalence of which is on the rise worldwide. Fermented soybean products (FSP) are rich in diverse functional ingredients which have been shown to exhibit therapeutic properties in alleviating hyperglycemia. This review summarizes the hypoglycemic actions of FSP from the perspective of different target-related molecular signaling mechanisms in vitro, in vivo and clinical trials. FSP can ameliorate glucose metabolism disorder by functioning as carbohydrate digestive enzyme inhibitors, facilitating glucose transporter 4 translocation, accelerating muscular glucose utilization, inhibiting hepatic gluconeogenesis, ameliorating pancreatic dysfunction, relieving adipose tissue inflammation, and improving gut microbiota disorder. Sufficiently recognizing and exploiting the hypoglycemic activity of traditional fermented soybean foods could provide a new strategy in the development of the food fermentation industry. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

20 pages, 1386 KiB  
Review
Alcohol-Induced Headache with Neuroinflammation: Recent Progress
by He Zhu, Yanxia Xing, Otobong D. Akan and Tao Yang
Fermentation 2023, 9(2), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9020184 - 17 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4596
Abstract
Ethanol and other congeners in alcoholic beverages and foods are known triggers of alcohol-induced headaches (AIHs). Recent studies implicate AIHs as an important underlying factor for neuroinflammation. Studies show the relationship between alcoholic beverages, AIH agents, neuroinflammation, and the pathway they elicit. However, [...] Read more.
Ethanol and other congeners in alcoholic beverages and foods are known triggers of alcohol-induced headaches (AIHs). Recent studies implicate AIHs as an important underlying factor for neuroinflammation. Studies show the relationship between alcoholic beverages, AIH agents, neuroinflammation, and the pathway they elicit. However, studies elucidating specific AIH agents’ pathways are scarce. Works reviewing their pathways can give invaluable insights into specific substances’ patterns and how they can be controlled. Hence, we reviewed the current understanding of how AIH agents in alcoholic beverages affect neuroinflammation and their specific roles. Ethanol upregulates transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression levels; both receptors trigger a neuroinflammation response that promotes AIH manifestation—the most common cause of AIHs. Other congeners such as histamine, 5-HT, and condensed tannins also upregulate TRPV1 and TLR4, neuroinflammatory conditions, and AIHs. Data elucidating AIH agents, associating pathways, and fermentation parameters can help reduce or eliminate AIH inducers and create healthier beverages. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 1482 KiB  
Review
Traditional Fermented Foods: Challenges, Sources, and Health Benefits of Fatty Acids
by Yanxia Xing, Mengzhen Huang, Chinasa V. Olovo, Chiamaka L. Mgbechidinma, Yu Yang, Jing Liu, Bo Li, Mengliu Zhu, Kexue Yu, He Zhu, Xiaoman Yao, Le Bo and Otobong D. Akan
Fermentation 2023, 9(2), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9020110 - 24 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4946
Abstract
Traditional fermented foods harbor microbes that transform raw food components, improving their nutritional, shelf life, organoleptic, and health-promoting characteristics. Fermented foods are an important conduit of contact between bioactive components that act like antigens and the human body system. Versatile microbes in traditional [...] Read more.
Traditional fermented foods harbor microbes that transform raw food components, improving their nutritional, shelf life, organoleptic, and health-promoting characteristics. Fermented foods are an important conduit of contact between bioactive components that act like antigens and the human body system. Versatile microbes in traditional fermented foods are associated with many health-promoting end-products, including dietary fatty acids and inherent fermenting microbial cells. Evidence shows that dietary fatty acid components regulate genes in a hormonally dependent manner, either directly via specific binding to nuclear receptors or indirectly by changing regulatory transcription factors. Fatty acids are implicated in anti-inflammatory, anti-obesogenic, immunoregulatory, cardioprotective, etc., activities. Challenges with scaling the production of traditional fermented foods stem from losing effective consortiums of microbial groups and the production of differential end-products. Industrialists scaling the production of traditional fermented foods must overcome safety and consistency challenges. They need to combine processes that lessen the advent of public health issues and introduce omics technologies that identify and maintain effective consortium groups, prune genes that code for toxic products, and inculcate microbes with additional beneficial characteristics. Incorporating omics in production will avail the benefits of traditional fermented foods to a larger population that craves them outside their native areas. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop