The Development of Novel Functional Foods Development: Trends, Prospectives, and Possible Bioactivity

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 1907

Special Issue Editors

Unit of Human Nutrition, Laboratory of Nutrition and Health, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of the Aegean, 81400 Lemnos, Greece
Interests: nutrition and health; functional foods; bioactive compounds; bioactivity and bioavailability; phytochemicals and chronic diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Food Science and Technology, Ionian University, Kefalonia, Greece
Interests: bioprocessing; food waste valorization; bioeconomy & food products development; edible films; oleogels
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Food Science and Technology, Ionian University, 28100 Kefalonia, Greece
Interests: industrial fermentations; food and by-products chemistry and analysis; valorization of renewable resources; biorefineries; food biotechnology, bioeconomy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many studies support the potential bioactivity of specific natural or processed functional foods due to their content in a plethora of bioactive ingredients, such as probiotics, fibers, antioxidants, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, peptides, and phytochemicals. In this vein, in recent years, the food industry has focused on the development of novel processed foods that are rich in bioactive compounds, such as fortified and enriched foods, with potential nutritional or health claims, alongside the use of novel technologies. These novel functional products, consumed as part of a balanced diet in the form of ready-to-eat products, may help prevent nutrient deficiencies and promote health.

This Special Issue focuses on the further investigation of new technologies for the development of novel functional foods (encapsulation, fortification, lyophilization, etc.), to increase the bioactivity, stability, and bioavailability of the bioactive compounds and their possible effect on biomarkers of human health. We welcome papers that report the latest evidence-based results on the development, bioactivity, and bioavailability of novel functional foods. Animal experiments, clinical trials, and epidemiological studies, as well as vitro studies, meta-analyses, and review articles, are also welcome.

Dr. Antonios E. Koutelidakis
Prof. Dr. Yiannis Kourkoutas
Prof. Dr. Andreas Tzakos
Dr. Aikaterini Papadaki
Dr. Nikolaos Kopsahelis
Guest Editors

Note: All the guest editors are members of FOODBIOMES which is a new distributed research infrastructure of the Agri-food sector established in Greece that aims to offer world class research, education and innovation services exploring the impact of microbiome applications in food systems and the development of novel functional foods.

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Keywords

  • novel functional foods
  • bioactivity
  • bioavailability
  • interventional studies
  • novel technologies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 3401 KiB  
Article
Cereals and Fruits as Effective Delivery Vehicles of Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus through Gastrointestinal Transit
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(15), 8643; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13158643 - 27 Jul 2023
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Abstract
The viability of probiotic cells during their transit through the degradative conditions of the gastrointestinal tract is considered an essential prerequisite for their effectiveness. To enhance the survival of probiotics, cell immobilization has been proposed as a promising strategy, creating a protective microenvironment. [...] Read more.
The viability of probiotic cells during their transit through the degradative conditions of the gastrointestinal tract is considered an essential prerequisite for their effectiveness. To enhance the survival of probiotics, cell immobilization has been proposed as a promising strategy, creating a protective microenvironment. In the present study, the viability of immobilized Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus OLXAL-1 cells on cereals and fruits was investigated in comparison to free cells, applying both an in vitro static digestion and an in vivo mouse model. During the in vitro digestion, the survival rates of all immobilized L. rhamnosus OLXAL-1 cultures were higher compared to free cells, with the highest survival rate recorded in oat flakes (84.76%). In a subsequent step, following the administration of both immobilized and free cells to BALB/c mice, a significant increase in lactobacilli populations was observed in the mice feces compared to baseline. Notably, the group receiving the immobilized cells exhibited significantly higher lactobacilli counts compared to the group fed with free cells (8.02 log CFU/g and 7.64 log CFU/g, respectively). Finally, the presence of L. rhamnosus cells at levels > 6 log CFU/g was verified in the mice feces in both groups through multiplex PCR analysis. Full article
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Review

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16 pages, 780 KiB  
Review
Functional Foods’ Consumption in Children and Parents: A Literature Review
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 1492; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14041492 - 12 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Among young children, parents are a main factor in children’s preferences for food served as they are responsible for purchasing and providing functional foods (FFs) and they are role models for them. This review study was conducted according to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items [...] Read more.
Among young children, parents are a main factor in children’s preferences for food served as they are responsible for purchasing and providing functional foods (FFs) and they are role models for them. This review study was conducted according to PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines and aimed at reviewing the recent data about the consumption of FFs in families as part of a balanced diet. The literature search was conducted via the online academic search engines PubMed, ResearchGate and Google Scholar. The search process was restricted to research papers published in English in reviewed journals from 2012 to 2023. Thirty-six articles were ultimately included in the present review. The findings indicated a relationship between several sociodemographic factors and a higher likelihood of purchasing FFs for children. Higher household annual income, education levels and purchase frequencies among females are all positively correlated with higher levels of nutritional knowledge and confidence in the validity of scientific research on FFs. Also, parents’ sociodemographic factors affect the children’s fruit/vegetable consumption. This study concludes that parents are role models for their children’s eating behavior and eating habits. Full article
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