Next Issue
Volume 14, April
Previous Issue
Volume 14, February
 
 

Educ. Sci., Volume 14, Issue 3 (March 2024) – 126 articles

Cover Story (view full-size image): Augmented reality (AR) enriches education by making learning interactive, necessitating teacher training in AR creation and integration. Despite AR’s impact on learning effectiveness, no rubrics exist for assessing its educational integration. The EVAR rubric was built to fill this gap, building on previous frameworks and incorporating instructional design, covering 18 items across five subscales with a four-point Likert scale. Its validity and reliability were tested on AR scenarios by pre-service teachers at the University of Konstanz, evaluated by AR experts. The results highlight the insufficiency of simple AR characteristic classifications for pedagogical quality assessment. The EVAR rubric, demonstrating high inter-rater reliability, effectively evaluates AR's educational quality and integration into lessons. View this paper
  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Reader to open them.
Order results
Result details
Section
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
15 pages, 2849 KiB  
Article
A Novel Influence Analysis-Based University Major Similarity Study
by Ningqi Zhang, Qingyun Li, Sissi Xiaoxiao Wu, Junjie Zhu and Jie Han
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 337; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030337 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 476
Abstract
In the field of education, investigating the relationships between different majors in universities is an important topic in current educational research. The application of social networks from informatics provides new opportunities and potentials for the field of education. Due to the complexity of [...] Read more.
In the field of education, investigating the relationships between different majors in universities is an important topic in current educational research. The application of social networks from informatics provides new opportunities and potentials for the field of education. Due to the complexity of social interactions, the social network connections surrounding individuals exert a significant influence on their daily decision-making processes. This paper aims to introduce the social network and influence analysis theories from informatics into the field of education, regarding major as a variable, and comparing and analyzing the influence relationships between majors. An empirical study was conducted, involving the collection of questionnaire data on graduates’ evaluations of various aspects of their university experiences across different majors. The evolution of this model follows the DeGroot opinion dynamics with the inclusion of stubborn nodes. By defining leader majors and general majors based on the data and modeling the questionnaire data as the outcome of a discrete random process, an influence matrix is ultimately generated through the opinion dynamic model. Through this modeling approach, we revealed the underlying influence relationships between different disciplines (majors). These findings provide schools with insights to adjust the directions of discipline cultivation, and offer new perspectives and methods for the study of majors in higher education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges and Trends for Modern Higher Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 249 KiB  
Article
Collaborating with Families for Innovative School Mental Health
by Hadley F. Bachman, Patrick D. Cunningham and Barbara J. Boone
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030336 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 727
Abstract
In this study, a comprehensive narrative literature review is presented, examining the cross-section between family engagement and student mental health. Guided by two research questions and grounded in resiliency theory, the overlapping spheres of influence framework, and the literature on protective factors and [...] Read more.
In this study, a comprehensive narrative literature review is presented, examining the cross-section between family engagement and student mental health. Guided by two research questions and grounded in resiliency theory, the overlapping spheres of influence framework, and the literature on protective factors and positive childhood experiences, this study unveiled five primary themes: emphasizing the importance of educators promoting supportive relationships at home, engaging families in building teacher–student connections, collaborating to establish routines and rituals, nurturing a sense of belonging at home and at school, and fostering collaborative problem solving and self-regulation. These themes are illuminated through practical vignettes. This study guides school-based mental health practitioners and educators and provides a roadmap for future research in family–school partnership for enhancing student well-being. Full article
23 pages, 5119 KiB  
Article
An Integrated Methodological Approach for Documenting Individual and Collective Mathematical Progress: Reinventing the Euler Method Algorithmic Tool
by Chris Rasmussen, Megan Wawro and Michelle Zandieh
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030335 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 509
Abstract
In this paper we advance a methodological approach for documenting the mathematical progress of learners as an integrated analysis of individual and collective activity. Our approach is grounded in and expands the emergent perspective by integrating four analytic constructs: individual meanings, individual participation, [...] Read more.
In this paper we advance a methodological approach for documenting the mathematical progress of learners as an integrated analysis of individual and collective activity. Our approach is grounded in and expands the emergent perspective by integrating four analytic constructs: individual meanings, individual participation, collective mathematical practices, and collective disciplinary practices. Using video data of one small group of four students in an inquiry-oriented differential equations classroom, we analyze a 10 min segment in which one small group reinvent Euler’s method, an algorithmic tool for approximating solutions to differential equations. A central intellectual contribution of this work is elaborating and coordinating the four methodological constructs with greater integration, cohesiveness, and coherence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methods and Tools in Mathematics Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 884 KiB  
Article
A Mixed-Methods Study of How a Critical Race Theory-Informed Undergraduate Research Experience Program Provides Equitable Support for Aspiring Graduate Students
by Frank Fernandez, Sarah Mason, Shannon Sharp, Gabriela Chavira, Crist S. Khachikian, Patchareeya Kwan and Carrie Saetermoe
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 334; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030334 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 732
Abstract
Numerous studies document the benefits of participating in undergraduate research experiences (UREs), including greater odds of enrolling in graduate school. However, there is a lack of understanding about how UREs support student success. This study examines survey and interview data from a multi-year [...] Read more.
Numerous studies document the benefits of participating in undergraduate research experiences (UREs), including greater odds of enrolling in graduate school. However, there is a lack of understanding about how UREs support student success. This study examines survey and interview data from a multi-year program evaluation of a National Institutes of Health-funded biomedical training program to consider whether and how participating in a URE fosters students’ sense of belonging, which is an important predictor of retention and graduation. Analyzing the quantitative survey data revealed that participating in the URE was positively associated with a sense of belonging even after controlling for students’ background characteristics, including gender, race or ethnicity, first-generation status, commuting burden, and age. Additionally, there was a positive relationship between a sense of belonging and odds of applying to graduate school. Path analysis suggests that the URE has an indirect relationship with applying to a graduate program that operates through the URE’s direct relationship with sense of belonging. Interview data offered insights into how the URE supported an increased sense of belonging. Specifically, we found that the URE fostered a sense of belonging when (1) faculty research mentors develop authentic, personal, and caring relationships with mentees, (2) the URE program welcomes, cultivates, and supports women and racially diverse students, and (3) the URE is embedded within a university environment that allows for faculty and peer engagement. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 7856 KiB  
Article
Resources and Praxeologies Involved in Teachers’ Design of an Interdisciplinary STEAM Activity
by Gabriella Pocalana, Ornella Robutti and Elena Ciartano
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 333; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030333 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 642
Abstract
This study aimed to examine the collaborative design of an interdisciplinary STEAM activity conducted by lower-secondary school teachers of different disciplines. We adopted an approach based on a case study involving four teachers (art, music, technology, and mathematics/science teachers) designing an activity focused [...] Read more.
This study aimed to examine the collaborative design of an interdisciplinary STEAM activity conducted by lower-secondary school teachers of different disciplines. We adopted an approach based on a case study involving four teachers (art, music, technology, and mathematics/science teachers) designing an activity focused on the concept of symmetry. We gathered data through oral, semi-structured interviews with the teachers and through schematic representations of resource systems provided by the teachers themselves. Data analysis aimed to identify the different kinds of resources the teachers relied on, their utilization schemes, and the overarching meta-didactical praxeology adopted by the teachers for their collaborative design work. The theoretical model adopted for data analysis was a combination of the Documentational Approach to Didactics and the Meta-Didactical Transposition frameworks, originally introduced to study the work of researchers in the context of teacher professional development. An application of this model to the collaborative design work of teachers can provide a fresh insight into the relationship between teachers’ documentation work for the design of a STEAM activity, the practices that they adopt to address this shared task (praxis), and the shared justifying discourses (logos) for their praxis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Methods and Tools in Mathematics Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 219 KiB  
Article
Beyond the Game: The Influence of Varying Degrees of Sports Involvement on College Students’ Self-Perceptions and Institutional Affiliation
by Dalit Lev Arey and Orr Levental
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 332; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030332 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 648
Abstract
This research investigates the impact of varying levels of sports participation on college students’ self-perception and their sense of connection to their educational institution, with a specific focus on an Israeli context. Recognizing the gap in the existing literature regarding the nuanced effects [...] Read more.
This research investigates the impact of varying levels of sports participation on college students’ self-perception and their sense of connection to their educational institution, with a specific focus on an Israeli context. Recognizing the gap in the existing literature regarding the nuanced effects of different degrees of sports engagement, this study aims to offer insights into how sports involvement shapes students’ academic, social, and psychological experiences. Utilizing a qualitative approach, the research involved conducting 26 semi-structured interviews with undergraduate students from a northern Israeli college, encompassing a diverse range of sports participation levels, from occasional involvement to committed varsity athletes. The findings reveal that sports participation significantly enhances students’ perceptions of their academic and social abilities, fosters a sense of belonging to the institution, and cultivates institutional pride, regardless of the level of involvement. Particularly noteworthy is the positive correlation between sports engagement and heightened self-esteem and self-efficacy. This study contributes to the understanding of the broader impacts of sports in higher education, highlighting its role in personal development and institutional affiliation. The research underscores the need for further studies in varied cultural contexts to deepen the understanding of these dynamics. Additionally, the study’s focus on an Israeli sample provides a unique perspective on the role of sports in a culture where collegiate sports are less academically explored. This research serves as a stepping stone for future quantitative investigations to objectively measure and enhance the understanding of the relationship between sports participation and student development in higher education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive and Emotional Aspects of Academic Performance)
15 pages, 239 KiB  
Article
Re-Imagining Leadership Roles beyond the Shadow of Bureaucracy
by Lisa Catherine Ehrich and Fenwick Walter English
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 331; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030331 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 578
Abstract
The aim of this conceptual paper is to revisit the relationship between leadership and bureaucracy. The dominant and unquestioned way of thinking about leadership is to equate it as an undertaking exercised by leaders, those officers who occupy hierarchical positions in organizations. For [...] Read more.
The aim of this conceptual paper is to revisit the relationship between leadership and bureaucracy. The dominant and unquestioned way of thinking about leadership is to equate it as an undertaking exercised by leaders, those officers who occupy hierarchical positions in organizations. For example, senior leadership and middle leadership in schools are often associated with formal hierarchical roles played by senior and middle leaders. However, it can be argued that this perspective is problematic, not only because it is leader-centric but also due to its limitations in explaining the phenomenon of leadership. In order to understand the relationship between leadership and bureaucracy and leadership outside of bureaucracy, the paper reviews some of the extant literature in the field, including a brief history of bureaucracy, its pervasiveness in educational institutions, and current neo-liberal policies and reforms that function effectively within bureaucratic structures. An important contribution of the paper is a synoptic conceptual model that brings together three worldviews or archetypes pertaining to bureaucracy. These are a hard-edged view (system first, people second), a soft-edged view (people first, system second) and a third worldview (issue first, people second, system third). The third worldview signals a departure from the first two archetypes as it is an illustration of leadership outside the confines of bureaucracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Critical Issues for Senior, Middle and Other Levels of Leadership)
26 pages, 3011 KiB  
Systematic Review
Problem-Based Learning in Türkiye: A Systematic Literature Review of Research in Science Education
by Behiye Akcay and İbrahim Benek
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 330; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030330 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 671
Abstract
This study aimed to conduct a systematic literature review of research to provide an overview of the key findings and trends in studies on problem-based learning within the context of science education in Türkiye. To achieve this goal, descriptive content analysis was used [...] Read more.
This study aimed to conduct a systematic literature review of research to provide an overview of the key findings and trends in studies on problem-based learning within the context of science education in Türkiye. To achieve this goal, descriptive content analysis was used in this study. Articles and graduate theses conducted in Türkiye between 2000 and December 2023 were included in this study. The Turkish Academic Network and Information Center (TR Dizin) and National Thesis Center databases were used to access the articles and theses. The purposive sampling method known as the criterion sampling method was employed in this study, resulting in the inclusion of 133 studies, including 37 articles and 96 graduate theses. To facilitate data analysis, we developed a coding form. The results of this study showed that PBL had a positive impact on 34 different skills, and it had no impact on 11 different skills. Across all reviewed studies, the most preferred research design was the quasi-experimental design. There was limited inclusion of final-year students in the samples at various school levels, and researchers mainly preferred physics subjects for their studies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1097 KiB  
Project Report
Using Technology-Supported Approaches for the Development of Technical Skills Outside of the Classroom
by Sarah L. McKernon, Elliot A. Adderton and Luke J. Dawson
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 329; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030329 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 578
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic, and the subsequent lockdown, had a significant and disproportionate impact on subjects that required the development of clinical technical skills due to the lack of access to simulation classrooms and patients. To directly address this impact, we developed a conceptual [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic, and the subsequent lockdown, had a significant and disproportionate impact on subjects that required the development of clinical technical skills due to the lack of access to simulation classrooms and patients. To directly address this impact, we developed a conceptual framework for the design and implementation of a progressive simulation approach from the perspective of a teacher. This conceptual framework integrates and draws from key theories of simulation design, curriculum integration, learner motivation, and considerations of the facets of good assessment, including modern approach validity. We used the conceptual framework to inform and develop a progressive simulation design to support the development of essential intra-oral suturing skills outside of the classroom, at home, while still being able to provide external feedback as if learners were in the classroom or clinic. Moreover, the approach described significantly extended the available opportunities for deliberate practice, assisting with the automation of essential skills and aiming to better support learner development during face-to-face patient opportunities. Although further work is needed, we believe that our conceptual framework could be applied to any situation where progressive simulation is seen as beneficial, especially if there are elements of key skills that could initially be developed using a simple take-home simulator. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 466 KiB  
Article
Mathematics and Language: A One-to-One Correspondence in Bilingual Environments
by Pilar Ester, Álvaro Moraleda and Isabel Morales
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 328; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030328 - 19 Mar 2024
Viewed by 639
Abstract
Previous research has shown that language is an essential part of the development of mathematical skills and, specifically, in solving verbal problems. We know that using a different language from one’s mother tongue is highly beneficial for students, and that language plurality and [...] Read more.
Previous research has shown that language is an essential part of the development of mathematical skills and, specifically, in solving verbal problems. We know that using a different language from one’s mother tongue is highly beneficial for students, and that language plurality and bilingualism is more and more habitual and present in current educational environments. However, what is still not clear is how it influences certain tasks, especially the most naturalistic ones, such as the formation of the concept of numbers and in tasks with a greater verbal component, such as solving problems in the early ages. The present research examined the problem-solving performance of first- and second-grade elementary education students in bilingual environments, comparing the problem solving of students whose language of instruction (LI) is the same as their mother tongue (MT) and those whose MT differs from the LI. Through an analysis of variance, the results showed that there exist differences in change and combination problems. Discrepancies in performance were also found, depending on the evolutionary moment. These results suggest that it is necessary to study how the LI can shape mathematical skills in the early years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Language and Literacy Education)
17 pages, 759 KiB  
Article
Culturally Responsive Middle Leadership for Equitable Student Outcomes
by Camilla Highfield, Melinda Webber and Rachel Woods
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 327; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030327 - 19 Mar 2024
Viewed by 616
Abstract
Middle leaders are important conduits for school policy and are often required to lead, champion and monitor change initiatives in their departments. This paper examines secondary school middle leaders’ self-reported theories, promotion and leadership of culturally responsive teaching approaches for student equity. The [...] Read more.
Middle leaders are important conduits for school policy and are often required to lead, champion and monitor change initiatives in their departments. This paper examines secondary school middle leaders’ self-reported theories, promotion and leadership of culturally responsive teaching approaches for student equity. The study participants (n = 170) are curriculum leaders in state secondary schools throughout New Zealand, serving a range of diverse populations, including Indigenous Māori students. The quantitative and qualitative data for this project were thematically analysed to inquire into middle leaders’ articulation of their culturally responsive theories, practices, and pedagogical and curriculum leadership to assist members of their departments in supporting Māori student educational success. The study found that although middle leaders could clearly articulate culturally responsive, sustaining and revitalising pedagogies and leadership in alignment with government policies and expectations, they were less clear about the measures they used to evidence these practices. In addition, less than 30% of the middle leader participants mentioned academic achievement as an element of Māori student success, and few mentioned the importance of systematic monitoring of achievement data, or using them to support better learning outcomes for Māori students (184). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educational Leadership in School Improvement)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1266 KiB  
Article
The Future of Postsecondary Education in the Age of AI
by Alfred Essa
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030326 - 19 Mar 2024
Viewed by 701
Abstract
This paper examines a possible future for postsecondary education in the age of AI. The consensus view among economists is that AI is a general purpose technology (GPT), similar to the steam engine, electricity, and the internet. As a GPT, AI will be [...] Read more.
This paper examines a possible future for postsecondary education in the age of AI. The consensus view among economists is that AI is a general purpose technology (GPT), similar to the steam engine, electricity, and the internet. As a GPT, AI will be the main driver of innovation for the foreseeable future in most sectors of the economy, including education. As AI evolves, it holds the promise of fundamentally redefining the educational landscape, influencing not only current practices in institutional management and pedagogy but also shaping future trends in learning, evaluation, and accreditation. While traditional college-aged students have received significant attention in educational studies, this paper emphasizes the needs of adult learners as lifelong learners and explores how AI-driven innovations can enhance their educational experiences, offering personalized and flexible learning solutions. This paper also argues that a dramatic breakthrough is needed in the cost–value equation for education to support workforce development and lifelong learning. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

24 pages, 4646 KiB  
Article
Intangible Cultural Heritage Course Design in the Digital Age and Its Effects of Interdisciplinary Workshop
by Jia Xia, Takaya Yuizono, Tzu-Yang Wang and Eunyoung Kim
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030325 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 785
Abstract
This study demonstrates a new intangible cultural heritage (ICH) design course and its effectiveness of interdisciplinary teams with digital technology beyond conventional single-disciplinary teams. A design guideline for ICH was built on the basis of Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory (EST). Then, an evaluation [...] Read more.
This study demonstrates a new intangible cultural heritage (ICH) design course and its effectiveness of interdisciplinary teams with digital technology beyond conventional single-disciplinary teams. A design guideline for ICH was built on the basis of Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory (EST). Then, an evaluation standard involving five criteria (culture fit, creativity, aesthetics, experientiality, diversity) was established. Thirty students participated in the course and were divided into four teams of two types as follows: two interdisciplinary teams consisting of students from different backgrounds and two single-disciplinary teams consisting of students from the visual communication department. Experts assessed the design works and design process of the four teams according to the evaluation criteria as follows: (1) there are differences in the application of the ICH design guideline between the interdisciplinary approach with digital technology and the conventional teaching method, and (2) the ICH design course positively affects the five criteria. The interdisciplinary approach with digital technology in ICH design is more likely to stimulate students’ creativity. These findings emphasize the importance of new ICH design courses and provide insights for future design educators. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 461 KiB  
Article
Reframing Creative Teaching in Secondary Music Teacher Education
by Sabine Chatelain, Karine Barman, Carlos Lage-Gómez and Marcelle Moor
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 324; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030324 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 592
Abstract
According to research about creativity in education, creativity can be considered an ability that can be fostered through specific teaching strategies. Consequently, future secondary music teachers should be equipped with the knowledge to develop students’ musical creativity. A challenge for teacher training lies [...] Read more.
According to research about creativity in education, creativity can be considered an ability that can be fostered through specific teaching strategies. Consequently, future secondary music teachers should be equipped with the knowledge to develop students’ musical creativity. A challenge for teacher training lies in providing concepts and strategies to develop this professional knowledge. With the aim of improving a music didactics course, the purpose of this study was to understand how student teachers’ conceptions of creative music teaching evolved over one semester. In reference to the concept of creative teaching developed by Beghetto and research about the role of the teacher’s body in music education, a specific framework to identify aspects of creative pedagogical knowledge was conceived. A thematic analysis of two semi-structured interviews with five future secondary music teachers provided a detailed picture of the evolution of their conceptions about creative music teaching. Interestingly, student teachers’ knowledge of theoretical concepts presented in the course, as well as knowledge about the role of the body in creative music teaching, remained mainly implicit. Knowledge about their professional identities as creative musicians and pedagogues appeared to be relevant for enhancing awareness of how to teach with creativity. In order to describe this dimension more precisely, we develop the concept of creative stance knowledge as an emerging category from the data. Its potential for teacher training will be discussed, including a more embodied vision of creative pedagogical knowledge for music teacher training. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultivating Creativity and Innovation in Music Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 1041 KiB  
Review
The Influence of Active and Passive Procrastination on Academic Performance: A Meta-Analysis
by Niek Sebastiaan Kooren, Christine Van Nooijen and Fred Paas
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 323; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030323 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1727
Abstract
The relationship between academic performance and procrastination has been well documented over the last twenty years. The current research aggregates existing research on this topic. Most of the studies either find no result or a small negative result. However, recent studies suggest that [...] Read more.
The relationship between academic performance and procrastination has been well documented over the last twenty years. The current research aggregates existing research on this topic. Most of the studies either find no result or a small negative result. However, recent studies suggest that procrastination can have a positive influence on academic performance if the procrastination is active instead of passive. To analyse the effect of active procrastination on academic performance, a meta-analysis was conducted. The analysis includes 96 articles with 176 coefficients including a combined average of 55,477 participants related to the correlation between academic performance and procrastination. The analysis uncovered a modest negative correlation between academic performance and procrastination overall. Importantly, the type of procrastination exerted a substantial impact on the strength of this correlation: active procrastination demonstrated a small positive effect size, whereas passive procrastination registered a small negative effect size. Additionally, participant-specific characteristics and indicators further modulated the magnitude of the correlation. The implications of this research extend to underscoring a potential beneficial aspect of procrastination, specifically elucidating how certain types of procrastination can positively influence academic performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cognitive and Emotional Aspects of Academic Performance)
Show Figures

Figure 1

28 pages, 11078 KiB  
Article
Development and Validation of Scientific Inquiry Literacy Instrument (SILI) Using Rasch Measurement Model
by Dina Rahmi Darman, Andi Suhandi, Ida Kaniawati, Achmad Samsudin and Firmanul Catur Wibowo
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 322; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030322 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 735
Abstract
This research aims to develop an instrument of knowledge and skills called the Scientific Inquiry Literacy Instrument (SILI). Instrument measurement analysis uses the Rasch model by utilizing the Winsteps application. This research uses mixed methods research that combines interviews as qualitative research and [...] Read more.
This research aims to develop an instrument of knowledge and skills called the Scientific Inquiry Literacy Instrument (SILI). Instrument measurement analysis uses the Rasch model by utilizing the Winsteps application. This research uses mixed methods research that combines interviews as qualitative research and tests as quantitative research. The research design used is Sequential Exploratory. The SILI contains 28 knowledge aspect indicators and 37 skills aspect indicators. Based on the Outfit mean square (MNSQ), Z-Standard value (ZSTD), and point measure correlation value (Pt Mean Corr), it was obtained that the three aspects of the SILI meet the criteria for an acceptable item in the Rasch measurement model. Based on item analysis biased towards gender, region, and science major, all SILI items in knowledge and skills meet the probability criteria > 0.05, so all items can be used without harming one group. The findings of the research dimensionality of the SILI for aspects of knowledge and skills are 26.9% and 20.4%. Thus, all aspects of the SILI can measure what should be measured and fulfill all the criteria for items accepted based on the Rasch model for measuring science inquiry literacy. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1902 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Digital Teacher Education: Key Aspects for Bridging the Digital Divide and Improving the Teaching–Learning Process
by Sonia Val and Helena López-Bueno
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 321; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030321 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 770
Abstract
The quality of teacher education plays a key role in equipping students with the skills they need and it is important in avoiding learning inequalities. To bridge the digital divide and ensure that all students have equal access to technology and digital resources [...] Read more.
The quality of teacher education plays a key role in equipping students with the skills they need and it is important in avoiding learning inequalities. To bridge the digital divide and ensure that all students have equal access to technology and digital resources as well as advanced teaching–learning processes using digital tools, it is crucial to analyse the current state of teacher education in order to identify the key issues. The sample in this research consisted of 325 master of education students and in-service teachers studying at various universities (in Spain, Cyprus, and México) in the 2022–2023 academic year who filled out a questionnaire partly based on DigComEdu and this was expanded with questions relating to other digital and educational aspects. The findings reveal that there is potential for enhancement in many areas. Despite teachers having technical training associated with their profession, they lack the necessary training to overcome inequalities or digital gaps. Moreover, it is striking that those who are already working as teachers are the most pessimistic about aspects such as the use of digital resources, perhaps because of the difficulties they face in their daily work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Challenges and Experiences in Science Teacher Training)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 322 KiB  
Article
Evaporating Metacognitive Talk: School Inclusion, Power, and the Interplay of Structure and Agency
by Ezra Temko
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 320; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030320 - 17 Mar 2024
Viewed by 682
Abstract
This paper addresses Lukes’ and Hayward’s arguments that power should be conceived as agential versus structural. My fieldwork at Mitchell Primary School demonstrated that educators and students at Mitchell were structurally constrained and enabled but also exercised agency in navigating these institutional boundaries. [...] Read more.
This paper addresses Lukes’ and Hayward’s arguments that power should be conceived as agential versus structural. My fieldwork at Mitchell Primary School demonstrated that educators and students at Mitchell were structurally constrained and enabled but also exercised agency in navigating these institutional boundaries. Not only are both structural and agential conceptions of power valid, considering their interplay moves social analyses forward—at Mitchell, teachers’ otherwise-frequent metacognitive talk evaporated when their inclusion-oriented practices were more distant from institutional norms. Understanding power requires including its sources (from the individual actor to social structure) as one key dimension. Using this understanding could help educators more intentionally make conscious choices about their inclusion practices as they navigate their school environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Curriculum and Instruction)
18 pages, 3197 KiB  
Article
Attitudes toward Inclusive Education from a Network Perspective
by Tom Jannick Selisko, Eric Klopp, Christine Eckert and Franziska Perels
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 319; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030319 - 17 Mar 2024
Viewed by 688
Abstract
The present study showcases attitudes toward inclusive education in a new light. It contributes to the ongoing debate regarding the extent of inclusive education and highlights the importance of teachers in a process toward inclusion. Based on a framework that involves the reciprocal [...] Read more.
The present study showcases attitudes toward inclusive education in a new light. It contributes to the ongoing debate regarding the extent of inclusive education and highlights the importance of teachers in a process toward inclusion. Based on a framework that involves the reciprocal relation between models of disability, learning theory, and placement of persons with disabilities, attitudes of student teachers and psychology students from a German university are analyzed and mapped through the application of a network approach. This facilitates visualization and categorization based on their statistical relation. An online questionnaire consisting of established and newly developed scales was answered by (n=) 132 student teachers and (n=) 59 psychology students, resulting in n = 191 participants. The study was publicly promoted, and participants were offered study credentials. Using a Spinglass algorithm to analyze the data, we detected two distinct communities in the network: an Exclusion Community and an Inclusion Community. These are supported by further variables (Empathy, Contact, Authoritarianism, and Social Darwinism). The findings demonstrate an especially firm Exclusion Community, whereas inclusive attitudes appear to be varied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Special and Inclusive Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 2315 KiB  
Article
Digital vs. Hybrid: Comparing Two Versions of a Board Game for Teacher Training
by Francesca Pozzi, Andrea Ceregini, Stanislav Ivanov, Marcello Passarelli, Donatella Persico and Erica Volta
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 318; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030318 - 16 Mar 2024
Viewed by 647
Abstract
This study compares two versions (one digital, one hybrid) of a serious board game for teacher training called the “4Ts game”. Teachers play the game in groups to learn about—and directly engage in—the joint design of collaborative learning activities for their students by [...] Read more.
This study compares two versions (one digital, one hybrid) of a serious board game for teacher training called the “4Ts game”. Teachers play the game in groups to learn about—and directly engage in—the joint design of collaborative learning activities for their students by choosing the Tasks to be proposed, the Timing of activities, the Technologies to be used, and the Team composition, in an iterative process of decision making. The game comes in three versions: fully tangible, digital, and hybrid. This paper focuses on the interaction design of the digital and hybrid versions. In both cases, teachers pick cards up from four decks, read the prompts provided in the cards, and place them on a board to design a learning activity together. Their decision-making process is scaffolded by the digital or hybrid game versions, which provide feedback and suggestions and guide teachers toward the creation of a coherent design. The user experience is quite different in the two formats. In the hybrid game, teachers physically manipulate tangible cards on a tabletop board, and the board status is replicated on a laptop application that displays automatic feedback and guidance. By contrast, the digital version is played using an Interactive Whiteboard with touch-screen capabilities, thereby allowing teachers to manipulate digital cards on a digital board. The game was used in the context of two training initiatives targeting in-service school teachers (N = 42). Data were collected on acceptance of the model upon which the game is built, acceptance of the game itself, overall user satisfaction, and knowledge gains. Results show that teachers generally liked both versions of the game, especially the opportunity provided for receiving guidance in the design process. Additionally, teachers’ knowledge about learning design and collaborative learning increased significantly between the pre- and post-test for both the digital and the hybrid game groups. However, few significant differences were found between the groups that used the digital and hybrid versions of the game: the digital version was perceived as being slightly easier to use (p < 0.001). Overall, the study suggests that both versions of the game have the potential for teacher training, while the user interface of the hybrid version should be further refined to fully harness the game’s potential. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1721 KiB  
Article
Students’ Assessment of Learning in a Volleyball Course at a University: A Mixed Methods Study
by Ivar Fossland Moa, Pål Lagestad and Arne Sørensen
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 317; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030317 - 16 Mar 2024
Viewed by 566
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate students’ assessment of their learning after a teaching period of volleyball training in a university course. The teaching was research-based and linked to relevant theories of motor learning, small-sided games (SSG), teaching games for understanding [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to evaluate students’ assessment of their learning after a teaching period of volleyball training in a university course. The teaching was research-based and linked to relevant theories of motor learning, small-sided games (SSG), teaching games for understanding (TGfU), and motivational climate. To examine the research question, a mixed methods design was used, which included a questionnaire and reflection notes from the students. The questionnaire data constituted the basis for an analysis of the students’ reported development in their skills and knowledge in four relevant learning outcomes, while the qualitative data provided more in-depth data related to their learning. The statistical analyses showed a significant increase in the experience of skills and knowledge in all four relevant learning outcomes related to the curriculum of the course. From reporting poor or medium goal achievement prior to the course, the students, in general, reported good goal achievement after the course. The thematic analysis of the reflection notes supported these findings, in which game activities in small groups were especially identified as positive. Furthermore, the students stated that the teacher and a learning-oriented motivational climate were crucial in contributing to a positive learning environment. Some of the students reported too little instruction and feedback from the teacher during the course. The students expressed a few suggestions for changes to the content and methodology of the teaching. The study indicates that this type of research-based teaching may be important to produce a positive learning outcome for students. Our finding is consistent with previous research, which identifies which elements should be emphasized when implementing training in this subject area. As the survey only had 30 respondents and the design did not contain a control group, caution should be exercised when drawing strong conclusions from this study. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 1397 KiB  
Article
Game On, Reflection On: Reflection Diaries as a Tool for Promoting Reflection Skills in Geography Lessons
by Geraldine Baßeng and Alexandra Budke
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030316 - 16 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 562
Abstract
In this study, a diary was developed and used by students to reflect on digital games in geography lessons. The students’ reflection results, through the use of the diary, were compared with reflections without instructional guidance. These results show a significant improvement in [...] Read more.
In this study, a diary was developed and used by students to reflect on digital games in geography lessons. The students’ reflection results, through the use of the diary, were compared with reflections without instructional guidance. These results show a significant improvement in reflection through the use of the reflection diary compared to a previous study. Through the combination of lessons, play phases, and the reflection diary, a learning arrangement that enables in-depth reflections at different levels of reflection was created. The medium plays a decisive role by taking the pupils out of their role as players and enabling a critical distance to the game. With the help of the reflection diary, students should be able to better reflect on the game. The reflection diary is integrated into the lessons. It also shows that subject-specific lessons are indispensable for reflecting on the gaming experience in order to counteract subject-specific misconceptions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Education and Digital Societies for a Sustainable World)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 252 KiB  
Article
Courage to Create: A New Music Education Degree in Instrumental and Vocal Teaching
by Ernest H. C. Lim, Rebecca Y. P. Kan and Nellie S.-R. Seng
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 315; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030315 - 16 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 618
Abstract
As a special partnership that offers a unique way to strengthen the arts and cultural developments in Singapore, a new curriculum was offered to prepare students for instrumental and vocal teaching careers, with a focus on pedagogical instruction and educational theory. The purpose [...] Read more.
As a special partnership that offers a unique way to strengthen the arts and cultural developments in Singapore, a new curriculum was offered to prepare students for instrumental and vocal teaching careers, with a focus on pedagogical instruction and educational theory. The purpose of this study is to explore the experiences of music-student teachers engaged in this new programme within a conservatoire context. This paper outlines the framework of a new BEd (Honours) course in Instrumental and Vocal Teaching that addresses the current problem of conservatoire students being inadequately prepared for a profession in (studio) music teaching. Data were captured through focus group interviews with the first two cohorts of this programme in 2023. Three principal themes emerged from the thematic analysis, relating to how students valued contextualization, criticality and conversations within this new curriculum. The results highlight the impact of a specialist education that allows musicians to shape their profession in instrumental and vocal teaching, debunking the notion that conservatoire education is exclusive to talented performers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultivating Creativity and Innovation in Music Education)
13 pages, 1772 KiB  
Article
Multidisciplinary Capstone Senior Design Projects: A Comparative Analysis of IndustrySponsored and FacultySponsored Projects Using Comprehensive Performance Metrics
by Mohamed M. Morsy, Md. Nizam Uddin and Faycal Znidi
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 314; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030314 - 16 Mar 2024
Viewed by 613
Abstract
Engineering education has continually evolved to embrace ProjectBased Learning (PBL), a dynamic classroom approach emphasizing learning through engagement in realworld projects. The study conducts a comparative analysis of multidisciplinary Capstone Senior Design Projects across Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and [...] Read more.
Engineering education has continually evolved to embrace ProjectBased Learning (PBL), a dynamic classroom approach emphasizing learning through engagement in realworld projects. The study conducts a comparative analysis of multidisciplinary Capstone Senior Design Projects across Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Computer Science at Texas A&M University at Texarkana. The research emphasizes understanding the dynamics of student collaboration within these disciplines and scrutinizes the impact of industry and faculty sponsorship on these projects. The methodology involves a comprehensive comparative analysis, employing diverse performance metrics to evaluate the effectiveness of different sponsorship models. This approach aims to uncover the influence of these models on project outcomes and students’ educational experiences. The results reveal notable differences between industrysponsored and facultysponsored projects. Industry sponsorship leads to higher performance in overall project execution and professional skills development. In contrast, facultysponsored projects are more effective in nurturing teamwork and communication abilities among students. The findings suggest that each sponsorship type presents unique benefits and challenges. Industrysponsored projects provide valuable handson problemsolving experience, though they may suffer from inconsistencies in mentorship and varying expectations. Facultysponsored projects offer a more stable and consistent educational environment but might lag slightly in performance metrics. Integrating elements from both sponsorship models could provide students with a more balanced and enriching learning experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Project-Based Learning in Integrated STEM Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1596 KiB  
Article
Students’ Motivation and Engagement in the Implementation of Individual Development Plan for Underrepresented Minority (URM) Students in Undergraduate STEM Training Programs
by Nishika Edwards, Richard L. Goodwin, Mohammed K. Khalil, Lauren A. Fowler and Thomas Nathaniel
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 313; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030313 - 15 Mar 2024
Viewed by 861
Abstract
Despite recent progress, statistics show an urgent need for growth in the numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) students in STEM fields. An individual development plan (IDP) has been used to assist Ph.D. trainees in exploring career paths, developing short- and long-term career goals, [...] Read more.
Despite recent progress, statistics show an urgent need for growth in the numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) students in STEM fields. An individual development plan (IDP) has been used to assist Ph.D. trainees in exploring career paths, developing short- and long-term career goals, and creating action plans to achieve these goals. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and many institutions require the completion of the IDP by graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, and junior faculty mentees to enhance career development. However, little information exists regarding how motivated and behaviorally engaged undergraduate URM undergraduate students are in using IDP as a tool to develop their STEM career pathway. In this study, researchers present data from the motivation levels and behavioral engagement factors that are associated with the effectiveness of the IDP with 20 URM students recruited for the REP Summer program. A total of 85% of students strongly agreed that the IDP was most effective in assessing and reflecting on their academic and professional goals. The mentorship needs were met by 80% of the students, while 75% of the students agreed that the IDP was very effective in helping to identify short-term and long-term goals for their undergraduate studies. Moreover, 70% of the students were satisfied with the IDP in developing an action plan, identifying short-term and long-term goals for their professional careers, and assessing their scientific skills, interests, and values. URM students are intrinsically and extrinsically motivated to implement the IDP and pursue careers in STEM. Findings suggest that URM students’ motivation and behavioral engagement levels impact the effectiveness of the implemented IDP with these students. There is a need to identify factors that enhance the effectiveness of the IDP to determine how to maximize the career development of URM students in STEM programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section STEM Education)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 268 KiB  
Article
Inclusion and Inclusive Education in Russia: Analysis of Legislative and Strategic Documents at the State Level between 2012–2014
by Natallia Bahdanovich Hanssen and Aleksandra A. Alekseeva
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 312; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030312 - 15 Mar 2024
Viewed by 750
Abstract
Inclusive education is an important foundation of many societies, including the post-Soviet countries. It has been more than ten years since the official implementation of inclusion in Russia. However, the inclusive education system has not developed enough to be equally supported everywhere throughout [...] Read more.
Inclusive education is an important foundation of many societies, including the post-Soviet countries. It has been more than ten years since the official implementation of inclusion in Russia. However, the inclusive education system has not developed enough to be equally supported everywhere throughout the country, and is marked by controversial views on legal regulation and inclusive strategies. The purpose of this article is to examine inclusion and inclusive education, mainly for students with special educational needs, as understood in the educational policy. The data consist of legislative and strategic documents on the state level between 2012 to 2014. The data analysis was based on a qualitative content analysis. The analysis indicated two main themes: the subtle expression and lack of a definition for inclusion, and an inconsistent expression and definition of inclusive education. The results point to the necessity of encouraging discussions as well as reflections with respect to articulating and defining what inclusion is and how Russia can create an effective strategy for the further development of inclusive education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Special and Inclusive Education)
11 pages, 254 KiB  
Review
When Video Improves Learning in Higher Education
by Sven Trenholm and Fernando Marmolejo-Ramos
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 311; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030311 - 15 Mar 2024
Viewed by 782
Abstract
The use of video in education has become ubiquitous as technological developments have markedly improved the ability and facility to create, deliver, and view videos. The concomitant pedagogical transformation has created a sense of urgency regarding how video may be used to advance [...] Read more.
The use of video in education has become ubiquitous as technological developments have markedly improved the ability and facility to create, deliver, and view videos. The concomitant pedagogical transformation has created a sense of urgency regarding how video may be used to advance learning. Initial reviews have suggested only limited potential for the use of video in higher education. More recently, a systematic review of studies on the effect of video use on learning in higher education, published in the journal Review of Educational Research, found, overall, effects to be positive. In the present paper, we critique this study. We reveal significant gaps in the study methodology and write-up and use a cognitive processing lens to critically assess and re-analyse study data. We found the results of this study to be only applicable to learning requiring lower-level cognitive processing and conclude, consistent with prior research, that claims of a universal benefit are not yet warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Challenges in Digital Higher Education)
14 pages, 931 KiB  
Article
Technological Tools in Higher Education: A Qualitative Analysis from the Perspective of Students with Disabilities
by José Fernández-Cerero, Julio Cabero-Almenara and Marta Montenegro-Rueda
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 310; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030310 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 744
Abstract
The integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education has emerged as a transformative element, contributing significantly to the establishment of more inclusive educational environments. In this context, understanding the impact of technological tools becomes crucial to identifying the opportunities and limitations [...] Read more.
The integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education has emerged as a transformative element, contributing significantly to the establishment of more inclusive educational environments. In this context, understanding the impact of technological tools becomes crucial to identifying the opportunities and limitations that students encounter when incorporating these resources in university classrooms. The main objective of this research is to analyse the impact of ICT use in higher education, with a specific focus on the perceptions of students with disabilities. Information was collected through interviews with university students with disabilities. The results reveal both advantages and difficulties and underline the importance of designing and implementing technologies in an inclusive way. Key issues relating to accessibility and participation are addressed, providing valuable insights for improving inclusive higher education in the digital age. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ICTs in Managing Education Environments)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 307 KiB  
Review
Shaping Educational Strategies: A Literature Review on Uncertainty and the Unexpected
by Lorenza Maria Capolla
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 309; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030309 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 667
Abstract
A key feature of contemporary times is the high degree of complexity that impacts all spheres and aspects of today’s society, particularly within education. This complexity, deriving from a postdigital world in a polycrisis, causes continuous eventualities and results in these conditions of [...] Read more.
A key feature of contemporary times is the high degree of complexity that impacts all spheres and aspects of today’s society, particularly within education. This complexity, deriving from a postdigital world in a polycrisis, causes continuous eventualities and results in these conditions of uncertainty. This contribution reviews the present literature on the issues of the unexpected and uncertainty. From the 13 articles included in the review, an attempt is made to define the terms “uncertainty” and “unexpected” in order to scan the management strategies proposed by various authors in diverse fields, highlighting the correlation between uncertainty, the unexpected, and anxiety. Although this review revealed a lack of a universal definition of the “unexpected” and “uncertainty”, the analysis seems to have revealed some common and essential features in various articles and perspectives on the topic. Suggestions drawn from the analysis prove particularly useful in investigating the implications that uncertainty and the unexpected have in education, especially in training future teachers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Teacher Education)
13 pages, 543 KiB  
Article
Sex Education Actions at Universities: The Creation, Validity and Reliability of a Satisfaction Scale
by Irene Soto-Fernández, Jorge Perez-Perez, Sagrario Gómez-Cantarino, Fátima Frade, Ana Frias, Sara Palma, Helia Días, Vicki Aaberg, Elena Castagnaro, Daniela Mecugni and Raquel Fernández-Cézar
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 308; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030308 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1568
Abstract
Higher education is key to developing a competent and engaged society. Therefore, holistic learning is a fundamental element. This study aimed to test the validity and reliability of a questionnaire for extracurricular teaching actions in higher education. The questionnaire was delivered online to [...] Read more.
Higher education is key to developing a competent and engaged society. Therefore, holistic learning is a fundamental element. This study aimed to test the validity and reliability of a questionnaire for extracurricular teaching actions in higher education. The questionnaire was delivered online to nursing and teaching students participating in the extracurricular action organized by the universities participating in the EdSeX Project, in all cases worded in English. Reliability was measured through internal consistency provided by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient, yielding a value of 0.638 for the 19 items. The internal consistency for each latent variable measured by Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.816 for F1 (N = 6) and 0.625 for F2 (N = 3). This means that in the applicable satisfaction questionnaire, the professor interactions and the quality of the organization of the teaching activity of the topic are the most influential elements in the training action. The questionnaire proved to have a good validity and is therefore a reliable instrument to measure the level of higher education students’ satisfaction with learning. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop