Project-Based Learning in Integrated STEM Education

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "STEM Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 2983

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281, USA
Interests: project-based learning (PBL); STEM education; mathematics education; teacher education

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Guest Editor
College of Education & Behavioral Sciences, University of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN 46227, USA
Interests: project-based learning (PBL); mathematics education; professional development; teacher leadership; teacher education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Project-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogical approach that encourages the incorporation of various disciplines, aiming to foster a profound comprehension of how knowledge is developed and employed. STEM education has become a prominent focus in K-16 curricula, emphasizing the interconnectedness of these fields in preparing students for a dynamic future. To address these important topics, the forthcoming Special Issue of Education Sciences intends to provide relevant, interesting, and challenging articles demonstrating research, analysis, and promising practice related to all aspects of implementing project-based learning in K-16 classrooms.  

Contributions encompassing a wide range of themes related to this topic are welcome, including but not limited to:

  • Emphasis on mathematics in STEM PBL education research, particularly pedagogical strategies that facilitate the integration of mathematics into STEM education;
  • Exploration of effective PBL strategies within STEM contexts;
  • Examination of the impact of PBL on students' conceptual understanding and achievement;
  • Evaluation of the challenges and benefits of incorporating PBL in K-16 STEM education;
  • Laying the foundation for the effective use of PBL through theoretical and conceptual frameworks in STEM education;
  • Integrating social justice and culturally relevant pedagogy in PBL for STEM education;
  • Supporting special populations in STEM education;
  • Assessing student outcomes of PBL in STEM education.

This Special Issue aims to advance our understanding of PBL in promoting interdisciplinary education and its integration into STEM education. Researchers and practitioners are encouraged to submit papers delving into these themes, thereby contributing to the development of effective PBL pedagogical practices in STEM education environments.

Dr. Mi Yeon Lee
Dr. Jean S. Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • project-based learning
  • STEM education
  • mathematics education
  • research-based practices

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

26 pages, 1467 KiB  
Article
Establishing a PBL STEM Framework for Pre-Service Teachers
by Lisa N. Pitot, Maggie Lee McHugh and Jennifer Kosiak
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(6), 571; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14060571 (registering DOI) - 26 May 2024
Viewed by 102
Abstract
Research into pre-service teachers’ (PSTs) ability to develop meaningful interdisciplinary, project-based curricula is lacking; at the same time, many young adolescents fail to see the connections between their schoolwork and the real world. As such, there is a need for new methods to [...] Read more.
Research into pre-service teachers’ (PSTs) ability to develop meaningful interdisciplinary, project-based curricula is lacking; at the same time, many young adolescents fail to see the connections between their schoolwork and the real world. As such, there is a need for new methods to prepare elementary and middle school teachers’ abilities to integrate mathematics and science through authentic content. This article will examine how elementary and middle PSTs collaborated across their mathematics and science methods courses to design project-based learning (PBL) unit plans that integrate social justice and global awareness in a STEM context. The content analysis of 25 distinct PBL unit plans documented the levels at which PSTs could incorporate practical PBL design elements into their projects, integrate robust mathematical content, and identify connections to social justice and global awareness. Through this analysis, we will share the successes and challenges faced in guiding PSTs to create PBL STEM units and present a series of next steps that could be taken to further this cross-curricular endeavor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Project-Based Learning in Integrated STEM Education)
13 pages, 1772 KiB  
Article
Multidisciplinary Capstone Senior Design Projects: A Comparative Analysis of IndustrySponsored and FacultySponsored Projects Using Comprehensive Performance Metrics
by Mohamed M. Morsy, Md. Nizam Uddin and Faycal Znidi
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(3), 314; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14030314 - 16 Mar 2024
Viewed by 812
Abstract
Engineering education has continually evolved to embrace ProjectBased Learning (PBL), a dynamic classroom approach emphasizing learning through engagement in realworld projects. The study conducts a comparative analysis of multidisciplinary Capstone Senior Design Projects across Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and [...] Read more.
Engineering education has continually evolved to embrace ProjectBased Learning (PBL), a dynamic classroom approach emphasizing learning through engagement in realworld projects. The study conducts a comparative analysis of multidisciplinary Capstone Senior Design Projects across Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Computer Science at Texas A&M University at Texarkana. The research emphasizes understanding the dynamics of student collaboration within these disciplines and scrutinizes the impact of industry and faculty sponsorship on these projects. The methodology involves a comprehensive comparative analysis, employing diverse performance metrics to evaluate the effectiveness of different sponsorship models. This approach aims to uncover the influence of these models on project outcomes and students’ educational experiences. The results reveal notable differences between industrysponsored and facultysponsored projects. Industry sponsorship leads to higher performance in overall project execution and professional skills development. In contrast, facultysponsored projects are more effective in nurturing teamwork and communication abilities among students. The findings suggest that each sponsorship type presents unique benefits and challenges. Industrysponsored projects provide valuable handson problemsolving experience, though they may suffer from inconsistencies in mentorship and varying expectations. Facultysponsored projects offer a more stable and consistent educational environment but might lag slightly in performance metrics. Integrating elements from both sponsorship models could provide students with a more balanced and enriching learning experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Project-Based Learning in Integrated STEM Education)
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