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Fiber Optic and Photonic Sensors for Healthcare Monitoring: Technology and Applications

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2024 | Viewed by 1093

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, 20156 Milan, Italy
Interests: optical fiber sensors for biomedical applications; fiber Bragg grating sensors; measurement systems based on photonic technologies; thermal therapies for cancer treatment; thermal and mechanical measurements

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, 20156 Milan, Italy
Interests: fiber optic sensors for biomedical applications; laser-tissue interaction; optical-based methods for estimation of physiological parameters
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials, Physics Department, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: photonics; optics for aerospace; optical sensors; optical devices; machine learning for optics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fiber optic and photonic sensors exhibit numerous advantageous features, such as lightness, flexibility, small form factor, and immunity to electromagnetic interferences, which make them particularly suitable for healthcare monitoring and application in the biomedical field.

The high metrological performances of fiber optic-based and photonic sensing solutions allow for the detection of subtle changes in physiological parameters. Furthermore, the high sensitivity combined with the miniaturized size allows for the design of wearable and implantable sensors that promote long-term and unobtrusive monitoring, as well as the possible incorporation in medical devices and instrumentation. Integrating these sensors with wireless communication systems enables remote monitoring and telemonitoring, allowing patients and healthcare providers to continuously access vital health data.

With this Special Issue, we invite researchers and scientists working in academia and industry to submit their contributions, i.e., original research articles, reviews, and case studies on the advances, challenges, and novel applications of optical and photonic sensors in health monitoring. We look forward to receiving innovative research works to encourage further development and implementation of these sensing technologies in healthcare settings.

Dr. Leonardo Bianchi
Dr. Paola Saccomandi
Dr. Carlos Marques
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fiber optic sensors
  • optical fiber technology
  • fiber bragg grating sensors
  • fluoroptic sensors
  • photonic sensors
  • healthcare monitoring
  • wearable sensors
  • physiological monitoring
  • biosensor design and applications
  • metrological characterization of photonic-based sensors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 6153 KiB  
Article
Bite Force Mapping Based on Distributed Fiber Sensing Network Approach
by Zhanerke Katrenova, Shakhrizat Alisherov, Madina Yergibay, Zhanat Kappasov, Wilfred Blanc, Daniele Tosi and Carlo Molardi
Sensors 2024, 24(2), 537; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24020537 - 15 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 680
Abstract
Bite force measurements are crucial in the realm of biomedical research, particularly in the areas of dentistry and orthodontic care. Various intraoral devices have been used to assess biting force, but each has limitations and drawbacks. Fiber optic sensors (FOSs) offer advantages such [...] Read more.
Bite force measurements are crucial in the realm of biomedical research, particularly in the areas of dentistry and orthodontic care. Various intraoral devices have been used to assess biting force, but each has limitations and drawbacks. Fiber optic sensors (FOSs) offer advantages such as electrical inertness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and high sensitivity. Distributed fiber optic sensing allows an increase in the number of sensing points and can interrogate numerous reflections from scattering events within an optical fiber. We present four dental bites with heights of 6 mm, which enabled bilateral measurements. U-shaped sensors were prepared by embedding fibers into silicone by folding a single-mode fiber into four lines and multiplexing eight parallel nanoparticle-doped fibers. Dental bite models were created using two silicone materials (Sorta Clear 18 and Sorta Clear 40). The developed sensors were calibrated by applying weights up to 900 g, resulting in a linear response. Experiments were conducted to compare the efficacy of the dental bites. The collection of massive data was enabled by constructing a 2D map of the dental bites during multi-point sensing. Full article
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