Optical Fiber Grating Sensing Technology and Application

A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732). This special issue belongs to the section "Lasers, Light Sources and Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021) | Viewed by 9512

Special Issue Editors

Center for Cognition and Neuroergonomics, State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Zhuhai 519087, China
Interests: polymer optical fiber; multifunctional POF; biomedical application; microwave photonics; brain–computer interface
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Research Center for Advanced Optics and Photoelectronics, Department of Physics, College of Science, Shantou University, Shantou 515063, China
Interests: fiber Bragg gratings; tilted fiber Bragg gratings; polymer optical fiber sensors; surface plasmon resonance; biosensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
CICECO-Aveiro Institute of Materials, Physics Department, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: photonics; optics for aerospace; optical sensors; optical devices; machine learning for optics
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Special Issue Information

From their initial demonstration and fabrication in the late 80s, grating technology in optical fiber has gained significant attention as a sensing platform for physical, electrical, and biochemical detection. Moreover, the use of periodic structures in waveguides that exploit diffraction effects in a similar way has also become a subject of interest. Throughout the following decades of grating sensor technology, generational improvements have allowed for a substantial increase in the performance of sensing networks and an increase in commercial devices as well as emerging applications.

This Special Issue of Photonics reflects the rise of grating sensing technologies, focusing on all aspects of research and development of grating-related sensors. This Special Issue emphasizes research and review manuscripts that focus on experimental design, interrogation methods, test and design, and the application of grating sensors, as well as sensors based on Bragg grating variations (such as tilted, chirped, etched, superstructured, aperiodic, subwavelength gratings). We foresee that by providing researchers working on grating topics with a platform to publish their recent results, we can provide the research community with a wide breadth of research that encompasses design, experimental validation, and testing.

Dr. Min Rui
Dr. Xuehao Hu
Dr. Carlos Marques
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Passive sensors: LPG, FBGs, TFBGs, SSFBG, aperiodic, subwavelength gratings
  • Active sensors: laser/amplifier sensors, frequency comb-based sensors
  • Interrogation techniques for sensors: TDM, WDM, OFDM, OTDR, phase-OTDR, CDMA, MWP, THz, and their combinations
  • Fabrication of Bragg grating sensors: waveguides, silica fibers, POF, MCF, MMF, FMF
  • Optical chemical and biological sensors
  • Biomedical optical sensors
  • Micro and nano-engineered sensors
  • Nanophotonic and plasmonic biosensors
  • Sensing for food quality control
  • Health monitoring sensors
  • Environmental and industrial monitoring sensors.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 7866 KiB  
Article
Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Based on Polymer Liquid-Core Fiber for Refractive Index Detection
by Xuqing Shui, Qiongchan Gu, Xiaoxiao Jiang and Guangyuan Si
Photonics 2020, 7(4), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics7040123 - 03 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2346
Abstract
In this work, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on a novel liquid-core polymer optical fiber (POF) is proposed and numerically analyzed for refractive index (RI) detection. The polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fiber is selected as the platform for SPR sensing. We combine the [...] Read more.
In this work, a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on a novel liquid-core polymer optical fiber (POF) is proposed and numerically analyzed for refractive index (RI) detection. The polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fiber is selected as the platform for SPR sensing. We combine the PTFE-based POF with the liquid-core structure by introducing a hole filled with analyte into the fiber center. The hole also acts as the fiber core to guide the incident light. This design helps to realize the detection of solutions with low RI values (around 1.33), while keeping the distinguished sensing characteristics of the liquid-core structure. Two side air holes are introduced into the cladding and a thin silver film protected by a titanium dioxide layer is plated on the wall of one air hole, which helps to control the mode coupling. In order to optimize the design of this sensor, the impacts of parameters such as metal layer thicknesses and the central hole radius are investigated using the full-vector finite element method (FEM). After optimization, our design shows a wavelength interrogation sensitivity reaching up to 16,750 nm/RIU and an average full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 42.86 nm in the RI range of 1.325–1.35. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Grating Sensing Technology and Application)
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10 pages, 1759 KiB  
Letter
Dual-Core Fiber-Based Interferometer for Detection of Gas Refractive Index
by Haijin Chen, Xuehao Hu, Meifan He, Qianqing Yu, Zhenggang Lian, Zicheng Yang, Heng Wang and Hang Qu
Photonics 2020, 7(4), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics7040111 - 15 Nov 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 6589
Abstract
We demonstrate a dual-core fiber-based Mach–Zehnder interferometer that could be used for precise detection of variations in refractive indices of gaseous samples. The fiber used here have a solid germanium-doped silica core and an air core that allows gases to flow through. Coherent [...] Read more.
We demonstrate a dual-core fiber-based Mach–Zehnder interferometer that could be used for precise detection of variations in refractive indices of gaseous samples. The fiber used here have a solid germanium-doped silica core and an air core that allows gases to flow through. Coherent laser beams are coupled to the two cores, respectively, and thus excite guiding modes thereby. Interferogram would be produced as the light transmitted from the dual cores interferes. Variations in refractive index of the hollow core lead to variations in phase difference between the modes in the two cores, thus shifting the interference fringes. The fringe shifts can be then interrogated by a photodiode together with a narrow slit in front. The resolution of the sensor was found to be ~1 × 10−8 RIU, that is comparable to the highest resolution obtained by other fiber sensors reported in previous literatures. Other advantages of our sensor include very low cost, high sensitivity, straightforward sensing mechanism, and ease of fabrication. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Optical Fiber Grating Sensing Technology and Application)
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