Orofacial Pain, Bruxism and Sleep

A special issue of Oral (ISSN 2673-6373).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2023) | Viewed by 4415

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Dental Specialties, University of Campania, Luigi Vanvitelli, 80138 Naples, Italy
Interests: temporomandibular disorders; TED; temporomandibular joint; orofacial pain; dentistry; telemedicine; tele dentistry; implant; prosthesis; oral surgery
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Temporomandibular disorders, orofacial pain, and bruxism are topics that have been attracting increased interest from various professionals (e.g., dentists, orofacial pain practitioners, psychologists, sleep doctors, neurologists). Current approaches consider bruxism to comprise two different behaviors, observed during sleep and wakefulness, respectively.

Even though the etiopathogenesis of sleep bruxism is not fully understood, many distinct factors are believed to be associated with this muscular activity. An increasing amount of evidence suggests a relationship between sleep bruxism and other disorders or systemic diseases, including sleep breathing (obstructive sleep apnea syndrome) disorders, uncontrolled limb movements during sleep, reflux disease, and neurological disorders.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide the available evidence-based data of innovative advances and knowledge in oral diagnosis as well as to present the upcoming diagnostic and therapeutic technologies in the orofacial field.

Authors conducting studies on these themes are welcome to submit original research articles, reviews, short communications, case series, and case reports.

Dr. Giuseppe Minervini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Oral is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • temporomandibular disorders
  • bruxism
  • TMJ
  • TMD
  • orofacial pain
  • sleep
  • OSAS
  • obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 3048 KiB  
Article
Postoperative Recovery after TMJ Arthroscopy: Masticatory Improvement and Postoperative Diet
by David Faustino Ângelo, André Prior and Henrique José Cardoso
Oral 2023, 3(2), 191-202; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral3020017 - 3 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1529
Abstract
Background: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy has become popular due to its satisfactory long-term results and few surgical complications. However, patients’ postoperative recovery is poorly studied. This study evaluates the postoperative evolution of the masticatory function and the daily activities of patients who have [...] Read more.
Background: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy has become popular due to its satisfactory long-term results and few surgical complications. However, patients’ postoperative recovery is poorly studied. This study evaluates the postoperative evolution of the masticatory function and the daily activities of patients who have undergone TMJ arthroscopy. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in a Portuguese orofacial pain center with patients fulfilling the criteria for TMJ arthroscopy. For the first 30 days (D) after surgery, every 3 days, patients scored: (1) discomfort in the mastication of different food textures (soft, medium, hard); (2) time for a return to normal lifestyle (work, physical activities); and (3) TMJ pain during essential functions (mastication, speech, deglutition, deep breaths). The data were compared with preoperative results using descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA, and the Friedman test. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: Forty-two patients were assessed for eligibility; fifteen did not meet the inclusion criteria, and five declined participation. Twenty-two patients initially started the study, but two canceled on days 6–18, and eleven patients tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. Nine female patients with sixteen operated joints completed the study. A progressive tolerance for scaling food textures was observed. Soft and medium textures were tolerated after D15 and D21, respectively. The hard texture was not well tolerated in the 30 days after surgery. Discomfort returning to work and practicing physical exercise was significantly reduced on D15 and D21, respectively. In addition, significant improvements in TMJ pain during mastication and speech were observed over time. Conclusions: Despite the study’s limitations, namely the small sample size, the non-validated questionnaire, and the non-biomechanical analysis of food texture, it was possible to observe after TMJ arthroscopy an early return to masticatory capacity with the progressive introduction of different food textures. The authors expect these results will help in future postoperative guidelines regarding postoperative recovery from TMJ arthroscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orofacial Pain, Bruxism and Sleep)
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7 pages, 767 KiB  
Communication
Self-Reported Mandibular Impairment and Cervical Pain Comorbidity in Undergraduate Dental Students
by Luciana Paula Benício Arcas, Letícia Messias Marques Pinto, Ana Laura Sebben Fornari Moromizato, Jean Soares Miranda, João Paulo Mendes Tribst and Marina Amaral
Oral 2022, 2(4), 286-292; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral2040027 - 9 Nov 2022
Viewed by 2108
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of co-existence of self-reported mandibular functional impairment and cervical pain in the same individuals. Participants answered a validated Mandibular Functional Impairment Questionnaire (MFIQ) and also indicated in a schematic map the region of [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of co-existence of self-reported mandibular functional impairment and cervical pain in the same individuals. Participants answered a validated Mandibular Functional Impairment Questionnaire (MFIQ) and also indicated in a schematic map the region of cervical pain when it was reported. The frequency of cervical pain in participants with or without mandibular functional was compared with Chi-squared test. The final evaluated population consisted of 80 participants, 28 men (35%) and 52 women (65%), with ages ranging between 18 and 55 years (median = 20). It was found that 43.75% (n = 35) reported cervical pain, 15% of participants reported some degree of mandibular impairment, and 11.25% presented the comorbidity. In conclusion, participants with mandibular impairment presented significantly more frequent cervical pain than participants without mandibular impairment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orofacial Pain, Bruxism and Sleep)
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