New Technologies and Materials in Oral Health and Dental Care of Pediatric Dentistry

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Dentistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 11619

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Dental Specialties, University of Campania, Luigi Vanvitelli, 80138 Naples, Italy
Interests: temporomandibular disorders; TED; temporomandibular joint; orofacial pain; dentistry; telemedicine; tele dentistry; implant; prosthesis; oral surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pediatric dentistry is dedicated to the oral health of children, from infancy through to their teen years. Dental diseases are very frequent in the pediatric population; they range from caries to malocclusion to including very rare and complex diseases of multidisciplinary interest. Pediatric dental health includes diagnostics, clinical and instrumental factors, pathophysiology, and preventive as well as therapeutic aspects of dental pediatric patients, such that pediatric patients are a special group, one which often poses challenges in daily practice.

New technologies, such as digital devices, are able to enhance the effectiveness of the diagnostic process and increase the spectrum of detectable pathologies, dimorphisms, and dysfunctions in the orofacial region, as well as provide new clinical approaches to comprehensive craniofacial and temporomandibular disorders.

Recently, the extension of methods such as EMG, CBCT, and MRI to the dental field is receiving a lot of interest in the medical field. Telemedicine (teledentistry in the field of oral pathology) is a rapidly evolving healthcare delivery mechanism via hardware and/or software through which consultation, medical assistance, and information can be communicated over computer networks. We are all called upon to keep up with the developments that are occurring simultaneously in dentistry. Digital dentistry provides quantifiable benefits in terms of quality, time savings, and labor cost reductions in all fields of dentistry (orthodontics, prosthodontics, oral surgery, oral medicine, temporomandibular disorders, and restorative dentistry). The aim of this Special Issue is to provide available evidence-based data of innovative advances and knowledge in oral and craniofacial diagnoses, as well as to provide a new approach to the management of craniofacial disorders through upcoming diagnostic and therapeutic technologies.

Dr. Giuseppe Minervini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatric dentistry
  • technologies
  • materials
  • oral health
  • dental care
  • diagnostic
  • special care
  • dimorphisms
  • dysfunctions
  • orofacial region
  • craniofacial district
  • caries
  • malocclusion
  • temporomandibular disorders
  • orofacial pain
  • bruxism
  • OSAS
  • EMG
  • CBCT
  • MRI
  • orthodontics
  • prosthodontics
  • oral surgery
  • oral medicine
  • temporomandibular disorders
  • restorative dentistry
  • teledentistry

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

11 pages, 1077 KiB  
Article
Disinfection Efficacy of Laser Activation on Different Forms and Concentrations of Sodium Hypochlorite Root Canal Irrigant against Enterococcus faecalis in Primary Teeth
by Chandrashekar Murugesh Yavagal, Srinivas K. Subramani, Viplavi Chavan Patil, Puja C. Yavagal, Ramachandra P. Talwar, Mamata Iranna Hebbal, Selma A. Saadaldin, Elzahraa Eldwakhly, Manal M. Abdelhafeez and Mai Soliman
Children 2023, 10(12), 1887; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10121887 - 3 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1170
Abstract
Photoactivated disinfection with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) has improved primary root canal treatment outcomes. This in vitro study aims to assess and compare the disinfecting efficacy of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solution and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel, without laser activation and accompanied by laser activation, [...] Read more.
Photoactivated disinfection with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) has improved primary root canal treatment outcomes. This in vitro study aims to assess and compare the disinfecting efficacy of 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solution and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel, without laser activation and accompanied by laser activation, on Enterococcus faecalis-contaminated primary teeth root canals. After one month of incubating extracted teeth specimens with E. faecalis, 36 specimens were randomly divided into two groups: Group A (conventional method without laser-activated irrigation) and Group B (with laser-activated irrigation). Each group was further divided into three subgroups, with six samples in each subgroup. Subgroup 1 received irrigation with normal saline, Subgroup 2 with 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solution, and Subgroup 3 with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel. Diode laser activation at 810 nm was used in Group B. Bacterial colony counts were measured before and after the intervention. Student’s t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Tukey’s post hoc test were used for statistical analysis. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. Microbial analysis revealed no bacterial growth in samples irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel activated with the laser. Activation with the laser significantly (p = 0.02) improved the disinfection ability of the irrigant compared to the non-activation group. The disinfection ability of sodium hypochlorite gel was better than that of saline (p = 0.02); however, it was comparable to that of sodium hypochlorite solution (p = 0.67). Conclusion: Root canal irrigation with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel activated with an 810 nm diode laser resulted in complete eradication of Enterococcus faecalis, indicating its effectiveness as an endodontic disinfection treatment modality. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 802 KiB  
Article
Importance of Desensitization for Autistic Children in Dental Practice
by Eva Martínez Pérez, Alberto Adanero Velasco, Víctor Gómez Clemente, Mónica Miegimolle Herrero and Paloma Planells Del Pozo
Children 2023, 10(5), 796; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10050796 - 28 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1759
Abstract
Objectives: Dental treatment in special needs patients, including children with autism, can be accomplished by reducing the behaviors that can reduce fear, as it has been demonstrated in other studies. The present study aims to examine the influence of the latency time elapsing [...] Read more.
Objectives: Dental treatment in special needs patients, including children with autism, can be accomplished by reducing the behaviors that can reduce fear, as it has been demonstrated in other studies. The present study aims to examine the influence of the latency time elapsing between desensitization and the real dental situation on facilitating the access of children with autism to dental treatment. Study design: Nineteen patients with autism, who were aged 3–14 years and attended the Special Education Center in Madrid but were living with their parents at home, were selected for the study. All children in the sample were subjected to a desensitization process before attending the real dental office. Two study groups were established: the latency period between the last desensitization and the real situation was one day for the first group and seven days for the second group. An experimental study was conducted to assess the child’s cooperation in the dental chair; the dental examination was divided into several steps and the highest step reached by each child was recorded. Results: There is a statistical difference in the number of steps reached between the children who received the information just before the examination date and the children who experienced a longer latency period between receiving the information and experiencing the examination. Conclusions: We would like to emphasize the importance of providing information in advance when dealing with autistic children; this information should be as close as possible to the real situation. Additionally, we would like to stress the importance of inter-cooperation between parents, educators, and pediatric dentists in order to guarantee adequate oro-dental care for autistic children. Further studies with larger sample sizes and a control group are recommended. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 674 KiB  
Article
Postoperative Pain of Pediatric Patients Undergoing Dental Treatment under General Anesthesia Visiting a General Hospital: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Ateet Kakti, Reema Khalid Abumelha, Asmaa Mansour Alajmi, Lamis Khalid Dagriri, Lamia Abdullah Alkodari, Mohammed. J. Fares, Marco Cicciù and Giuseppe Minervini
Children 2023, 10(4), 671; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10040671 - 31 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1932
Abstract
Dental general anesthesia (GA) is a day-stay procedure and is a suitable choice for complicated cases. It is undertaken in a controlled hospital setting that ensures the quality, safety, efficacy, and efficiency of dental treatment. The purpose of this study is to determine [...] Read more.
Dental general anesthesia (GA) is a day-stay procedure and is a suitable choice for complicated cases. It is undertaken in a controlled hospital setting that ensures the quality, safety, efficacy, and efficiency of dental treatment. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence, severity, duration, and factors related to the occurrence of postoperative discomfort in young children following GA in a general hospital. This study includes a minimum sample size of 23 children that were undergoing GA over a 1-month period. Informed consent was obtained from the parent prior to the treatment. A preoperative questionnaire via the Survey Monkey program was used for the purposes of recording the responses of the survey population. All data related to the immediate postoperative period while the child was in the post-anesthetic recovery room (PAR) was collected and assessed by one of the investigators using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, and Consolability (FLACC) pain assessment scale. Postoperative data was gathered using the Dental Discomfort Questionnaire (DDQ-8) and was performed by phone 3 days after the GA procedure. The participating 23 children ranged from 4 to 9 years old (mean 5.43 ± 1.53). A total of 65.2% were girls and 34.8% were boys, with 30.4% experiencing a recent history of pain. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

11 pages, 753 KiB  
Review
Exploring Interleukin Levels in Type 1 Diabetes and Periodontitis: A Review with a Focus on Childhood
by Silvia D’Agostino, Giulia Valentini and Marco Dolci
Children 2024, 11(2), 238; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11020238 - 13 Feb 2024
Viewed by 881
Abstract
Diabetes can trigger an increase in cytokine levels leading to the production of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. These molecules promote subclinical inflammation, causing the expression of adhesive molecules and endothelial dysfunction. Despite the lack of a comprehensive panel for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for [...] Read more.
Diabetes can trigger an increase in cytokine levels leading to the production of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. These molecules promote subclinical inflammation, causing the expression of adhesive molecules and endothelial dysfunction. Despite the lack of a comprehensive panel for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for interleukins associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), understanding the inflammatory role of SNPs is crucial because periodontitis, the sixth complication of diabetes, is influenced via these genetic variations. This review focuses on the interleukin levels in T1DM patients with and without periodontitis, with a particular focus on childhood and on SNPs when reported. A search of PubMed and Scopus identified 21 relevant studies from the past five years. Several ILs were analyzed, emphasizing that T1DM still needs to be thoroughly explored regarding an IL polymorphisms panel; however, the last five years have led to the increased independence of this condition, causing autonomous inflammatory effects, which require further investigation. The periodontitis and T1DM association in children and adolescents represents a severe gap in the literature that should be filled; this scarce presence of studies serves as motivation for further clinical research. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

12 pages, 4412 KiB  
Case Report
Bimaxillary Dentoalveolar Protrusion Case Treated with Anchorage by Buccally Implemented Mini-Implants Using a 3D-Printed Surgical Guide
by Georgios Vasoglou, Athanasia Patatou and Michail Vasoglou
Children 2023, 10(5), 879; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10050879 - 14 May 2023
Viewed by 3220
Abstract
The article presents a case of bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion treated by distalizing the upper and lower teeth, using anchorage from mini implants. A 16-year-old male patient presented with severe upper and lower incisor proclination with protruding lips and a convex profile, with a [...] Read more.
The article presents a case of bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion treated by distalizing the upper and lower teeth, using anchorage from mini implants. A 16-year-old male patient presented with severe upper and lower incisor proclination with protruding lips and a convex profile, with a background of bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion. Instead of having four premolars extracted, retraction of the dentition was decided with absolute anchorage, provided by mini implants. In order to carry out the procedure in one stage, four mini-implants were inserted as close to the root of the 1st molars as possible. Implementation was facilitated by a surgical template which was created on a digital model and then 3D printed. Accurate placement was achieved and the case was successfully treated by significant uprighting of the incisors and retraction of the anterior dentition, closing the spaces in the upper and lower arch. Facial aesthetics were also improved. A digitally designed surgical guide was utilized in this case of bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion in order to facilitate the accurate placement of the mini implants which were used for a one-stage retraction of the dentition. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

7 pages, 2370 KiB  
Case Report
The Role of Artificial Intelligence in the Accurate Diagnosis and Treatment Planning of Non-Syndromic Supernumerary Teeth: A Case Report in a Six-Year-Old Boy
by Rasa Mladenovic, Katarina Kalevski, Bojana Davidovic, Svjetlana Jankovic, Vladimir S. Todorovic and Miroslav Vasovic
Children 2023, 10(5), 839; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10050839 - 6 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1656
Abstract
Hyperdontia can cause numerous aesthetic and functional problems. The diagnosis is made radiologically, and the most commonly used radiological method is orthopantomography, while CBCT is also used. CBCT has the advantage of being three-dimensional. Artificial Intelligence is widely used in medicine and dentistry, [...] Read more.
Hyperdontia can cause numerous aesthetic and functional problems. The diagnosis is made radiologically, and the most commonly used radiological method is orthopantomography, while CBCT is also used. CBCT has the advantage of being three-dimensional. Artificial Intelligence is widely used in medicine and dentistry, and it can create a specific algorithm to aid in diagnosis and suggest therapeutic procedures. In a case report, a 6-year-old boy was diagnosed with a supernumerary tooth between the upper central incisors. Orthopantomography revealed another impacted supernumerary tooth, and the patient was referred for CBCT. A platform for analyzing dental images, based on artificial intelligence, Diagnocat (Diagnocat Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA), was used for analysis and the AI system identified the supernumerary teeth and provided a complete plan for treatment. The use of AI in dentistry allows for faster and more accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop