Drug Metabolism and New Drug Development for Cancers

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacology and Drug Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1209

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 60-780 Poznan, Poland
Interests: drug analysis; drug stability; pharmaceutical chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 60-780 Poznan, Poland
Interests: parenteral nutrition; drug interaction; pharmaceutical chemistry; nanoformulation; nano-delivery system; drug stability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to contribute to this Special Issue. Cancer is one of the top causes of death worldwide. However, medical sciences do not remain indifferent and the race is on, the primary goal of which is to help patients through the development of new anticancer drugs and treatments. Understanding metabolic pathways and developing new molecules and formulations for drug delivery are only some of the possible weapons in this unequal fight. The path from developing an active ingredient to implementing the drug into clinical practice is long and involves the work of many specialists.

This Special Issue is devoted to Drug Metabolism and New Drug Development for Cancers and aims to publish original articles as well as interesting review articles on the following topics:

  • The biochemistry of anticancer molecules.
  • The impact of anticancer drugs/substances on metabolism.
  • Natural compounds/extracts and plant screening for antineoplastic activity metabolites.
  • Studies in pharmaceutical chemistry: drug structure and activity relationships or the development of new molecules.
  • Developing new delivery methods for known substances, for example, formulating new nanoforms such as liposomes, micelles, nanospheres, etc.

Additionally, this Special Issue will be a summary of important research in the development of medical sciences.

Prof. Dr. Anna Jelińska
Dr. Szymon Tomczak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cancer
  • new drug development
  • metabolites
  • secondary plant metabolites
  • drug delivery
  • nanoformulation
  • anticancer treatment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 4416 KiB  
Article
Elucidation and Regulation of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Resistance in Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells from the Perspective of Glutamine Metabolism
by Kento Morozumi, Yoshihide Kawasaki, Tomonori Sato, Masamitsu Maekawa, Shinya Takasaki, Shuichi Shimada, Takanari Sakai, Shinichi Yamashita, Nariyasu Mano and Akihiro Ito
Metabolites 2024, 14(3), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo14030170 - 19 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) play a crucial role in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, there is a lack of useful biomarkers for assessing treatment efficacy. Through urinary metabolite analysis, we identified the metabolites and pathways involved in TKI resistance [...] Read more.
Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) play a crucial role in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, there is a lack of useful biomarkers for assessing treatment efficacy. Through urinary metabolite analysis, we identified the metabolites and pathways involved in TKI resistance and elucidated the mechanism of TKI resistance. To verify the involvement of the identified metabolites obtained from urine metabolite analysis, we established sunitinib-resistant RCC cells and elucidated the antitumor effects of controlling the identified metabolic pathways in sunitinib-resistant RCC cells. Through the analysis of VEGFR signaling, we aimed to explore the mechanisms underlying the antitumor effects of metabolic control. Glutamine metabolism has emerged as a significant pathway in urinary metabolite analyses. In vitro and in vivo studies have revealed the antitumor effects of sunitinib-resistant RCC cells via knockdown of glutamine transporters. Furthermore, this antitumor effect is mediated by the control of VEGFR signaling via PTEN. Our findings highlight the involvement of glutamine metabolism in the prognosis and sunitinib resistance in patients with advanced RCC. Additionally, the regulating glutamine metabolism resulted in antitumor effects through sunitinib re-sensitivity in sunitinib-resistant RCC. Our results are expected to contribute to the more effective utilization of TKIs with further improvements in prognosis through current drug therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Drug Metabolism and New Drug Development for Cancers)
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