Design and Analysis of New and Retrofitted Eco-Friendly Ships and Offshore Structures

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 3254

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Centre for Marine Technology and Ocean Engineering (CENTEC), Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: marine structural design & analysis; fatigue and fracture mechanics; structural degradation; ultimate limit dtate analysis; structural reliability; risk-based maintenance; offshore wind farm
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: ship structures; wave loads; strength and vibration analysis; fatigue analysis; structural reliability analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue (SI) continues the previously completed SI “Design, Analysis and Maintenance of Green Innovative Marine Structures”. The scope of this new SI has been slightly adjusted to better fit modern marine industry trends in the era of climate change. In addition to the common topics related to marine structures, this SI will address the critical issues related to energy efficiency and zero pollution of newly designed and retrofitted ships and offshore structures. Although all types of ships and offshore structures are covered, studies dealing with autonomous ships, those with lightweight fibre-reinforced materials, new propulsion systems, and offshore renewable energy devices are particularly welcome. Improved numerical methods and original experimental studies on conventional and innovative marine vehicles are warmly invited for submission to this SI. Besides original research, authors are encouraged to submit case studies and review papers. A rapid review process and open access publication will be provided for all high-quality papers submitted to this SI.

Prof. Dr. Yordan Garbatov
Prof. Dr. Joško Parunov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ship and submarine structures
  • offshore structures
  • renewable energy supporting structures
  • lightweight fibre-reinforced materials
  • marine structural design
  • structural integrity assessment
  • maintenance and retrofitting
  • reliability and risk assessment

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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24 pages, 785 KiB  
Article
Retrofitting Technologies for Eco-Friendly Ship Structures: A Risk Analysis Perspective
by Athanasios Kolios
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(4), 679; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12040679 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 205
Abstract
This paper presents a detailed risk assessment framework tailored for retrofitting ship structures towards eco-friendliness. Addressing a critical gap in current research, it proposes a comprehensive strategy integrating technical, environmental, economic, and regulatory considerations. The framework, grounded in the Failure Mode, Effects, and [...] Read more.
This paper presents a detailed risk assessment framework tailored for retrofitting ship structures towards eco-friendliness. Addressing a critical gap in current research, it proposes a comprehensive strategy integrating technical, environmental, economic, and regulatory considerations. The framework, grounded in the Failure Mode, Effects, and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) approach, adeptly combines quantitative and qualitative methodologies to assess the feasibility and impact of retrofitting technologies. A case study on ferry electrification, highlighting options like fully electric and hybrid propulsion systems, illustrates the application of this framework. Fully Electric Systems pose challenges such as ensuring ample battery capacity and establishing the requisite charging infrastructure, despite offering significant emission reductions. Hybrid systems present a flexible alternative, balancing electric operation with conventional fuel to reduce emissions without compromising range. This study emphasizes a holistic risk mitigation strategy, aligning advanced technological applications with environmental and economic viability within a strict regulatory context. It advocates for specific risk control measures that refine retrofitting practices, guiding the maritime industry towards a more sustainable future within an evolving technological and regulatory landscape. Full article
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25 pages, 6858 KiB  
Article
Steering and Rising Testing of an Innovative Tourist Submarine
by Ivan Ćatipović, Marta Pedišić-Buča and Joško Parunov
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(2), 332; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12020332 - 15 Feb 2024
Viewed by 504
Abstract
An innovative tourist submarine was studied by scale-model tests in a towing tank to determine its steering capabilities and detect motion instabilities during usual manoeuvres and emergency rising. Motion instabilities are caused by the combination of the submarine motions and the fluid flow, [...] Read more.
An innovative tourist submarine was studied by scale-model tests in a towing tank to determine its steering capabilities and detect motion instabilities during usual manoeuvres and emergency rising. Motion instabilities are caused by the combination of the submarine motions and the fluid flow, leading to excessive roll and pitch that can cause severe endangerment to passenger safety. The submarine model was built on a scale of 1:9. The model had six thrusters to conduct the tested manoeuvres, i.e., two main thrusters at the stern, two side thrusters, and two vertical thrusters. The thrusters were computer-controlled, so each thruster had a speed controller and could run forwards and backwards. Six different steering tests and four rising tests were conducted, with at least two runs per test. During the tests, the roll and pitch were measured. Lifting the submarine by a crane was also a part of the experimental campaign. In general, the steering capabilities of the submarine were satisfactory and rolling instabilities were absent. Just a few deficiencies in the steering capabilities were detected. The rising tests were performed without any major motion instabilities, but in one case, the final position of the model at the surface was unstable. Full article
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17 pages, 6199 KiB  
Article
Re-Distribution of Welding Residual Stress in Fatigue Crack Propagation Considering Elastic–Plastic Behavior
by Yuxuan Xia, Jingxia Yue, Jiankang Lei, Ke Yang and Yordan Garbatov
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(12), 2378; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11122378 - 17 Dec 2023
Viewed by 758
Abstract
The welding residual stress re-distribution behavior during fatigue crack propagation in butt-welded high-strength steel plates for ship construction is investigated based on experimental test results and numerical analyses. The specimens’ initial welding residual stresses are obtained from X-ray for middle tensile (MT) specimens [...] Read more.
The welding residual stress re-distribution behavior during fatigue crack propagation in butt-welded high-strength steel plates for ship construction is investigated based on experimental test results and numerical analyses. The specimens’ initial welding residual stresses are obtained from X-ray for middle tensile (MT) specimens cut from butt-welded high-strength steel plates. Then, fatigue crack propagation experiments on MT specimens are conducted, and a strain gauge is used to measure the residual stress re-distribution field around cracks. A practical fatigue crack propagation simulation procedure is developed with a dynamic update of in-situ welding residual stress, where the residual stress intensity factor Kres of the MT specimen is deduced. The stress ratio effect on Kres during fatigue crack propagation is analyzed and a good agreement between experimental and numerical results is achieved. Full article
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Review

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24 pages, 3785 KiB  
Review
Review on Sensors for Sustainable and Safe Maritime Mobility
by Giovanni Briguglio and Vincenzo Crupi
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(2), 353; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12020353 - 19 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1063
Abstract
The increasingly stringent requirements—in terms of limiting pollutants and the constant need to make maritime transport safer—generated the necessity to foresee different solutions that are original. According to the European Maritime Safety Agency, the total number of reported marine casualties and incidents is [...] Read more.
The increasingly stringent requirements—in terms of limiting pollutants and the constant need to make maritime transport safer—generated the necessity to foresee different solutions that are original. According to the European Maritime Safety Agency, the total number of reported marine casualties and incidents is 21.173 over the period 2014–2021, with a yearly average of 2.647 casualties and incidents. According to the same source, 495 cases of pollution were reported in the period from 2014 to 2021. Marine pollution by ships’ fuel and other pollutants is linked to 64.2% of all pollution. It is mandatory to offer a new kind of ship that can exploit new technologies to increase safety for people and onboard goods. It has been found that existing marine structures for maritime mobility do not have essential sensors for avoiding emergency situations such as flooding, oil spills, or health situations requiring efficient monitoring. In addition, there is a lack of legislation defining the insertion of unmanned vehicles into the actual marine infrastructure. This review highlighted the strengths and weaknesses of sensors in the maritime sector, intensifying areas of improvement for future challenges, such as sensor energy efficiency, data processing, sensor fusion methodologies, and accurate sea state description with environmental monitoring by means of unmanned vehicles. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title1: Design loads for strength assessment of a semi-submersible platform of floating offshore wind turbine

Title2: Numerical assessment of hull structure strength of bio-composite-made catamaran
Abstract: A wide variety of small vessels are being built with composite materials, such as glass-fibre or carbon-fibre reinforced epoxy, due to their excellent properties in production. The longevity of the well-maintained material is measured in decades. At the end of a life-cycle, such composites become a dangerous waste, with low biodegradability. A viable alternative is the use of bio-composite, such as linen-fibre reinforced bio-based epoxy. The application of bio-composites is however not straightforward, due to water absorption rates and interlaminar shear strength issues, as well as restrictions made by Classification Rules. Recently, a superstructure of a 100-passenger catamaran was built using bio-composites and mounted on a fibre-glass hull. The scope of the paper is to perform a numerical investigation of the feasibility of building the hull using bio-composites. Two approaches were considered: the equivalent strength assessment approach, and the direct strength assessment approach. The former approach relies on the equivalence between bio-composite and fibre-glass composite, when not all bio-composite material properties are known, while the latter considers all material parameters. Both global and local structural analysis is performed to assess the global strength of the hull, as well as critical structural details.

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