Ship Structures II

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2023) | Viewed by 10416

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: ship structures; wave loads; strength and vibration analysis; fatigue analysis; structural reliability analysis
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Guest Editor
Centre for Marine Technology and Ocean Engineering (CENTEC), Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: marine structural design & analysis; fatigue and fracture mechanics; structural degradation; ultimate limit dtate analysis; structural reliability; risk-based maintenance; offshore wind farm
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Guest Editor
Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China
Interests: ultimate strength, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue, fracture mechanics analysis, fitness for service; engineering critical assessment for ships and offshore structures; subsea engineering, structural condition assessment and risk-based
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last decade, major efforts in developing ship structures have focused on reducing the risk of marine accidents and the emission of greenhouse gasses. These targets require continuous improvements in the knowledge of the demands imposed on modern and environmentally friendly ships and their structural capacity. In line with these objectives, the second edition of this Special Issue on ship structure, "Ship Structures II", invites the latest experimental and numerical studies related to shipping environments and their associated loads, static and dynamic ship structural responses, different failure modes and the development of risk-based safety criteria. The guest editors of this Special Issue, together with the editors of the Journal of Marine Science and Engineering, promise to provide a high-quality reviewing process and the efficient publication of your original research, review papers and case studies on the following topics:

  • Collision and grounding;
  • Fatigue and fracture mechanics;
  • Health monitoring and full-scale measurements;
  • Modelling of ice and ice-induced loads;
  • Probabilistic modelling of waves and wave-induced loads;
  • Quasi-static and dynamic structural analysis;
  • Risk-based maintenance planning of ship structures;
  • Springing and whipping of ship structures;
  • Strength assessment of corrosion-damaged ageing ship structures;
  • Structural design and optimization;
  • Ultimate strength of plates, stiffened panels and ship hull girders;
  • Uncertainty, reliability and risk-based methods;
  • Vibration and noise.

Prof. Dr. Joško Parunov
Prof. Dr. Yordan Garbatov
Prof. Dr. Nianzhong Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • corrosion degradation
  • crashworthiness
  • fatigue and fracture
  • hydroelasticity
  • loads
  • risk-based design and maintenance
  • ship structural analysis
  • structural optimization
  • structural reliability
  • ultimate strength
  • vibration and noise

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 29395 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study on the Flow Field, Force, and Moment Measurements of Submarines with Different Stern Control Surfaces
by Lin Ke, Jinming Ye and Qiufeng Liang
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(11), 2091; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11112091 - 31 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1079
Abstract
Flow field performance tests of submarine models with cross-rudder and X-rudder stern control surfaces were conducted to study X-rudders’ performance in non-uniform flow fields. The tests compared performance parameters such as resistance, lateral steering force, yaw moment, stern velocity field, and flow field [...] Read more.
Flow field performance tests of submarine models with cross-rudder and X-rudder stern control surfaces were conducted to study X-rudders’ performance in non-uniform flow fields. The tests compared performance parameters such as resistance, lateral steering force, yaw moment, stern velocity field, and flow field inhomogeneity coefficient under low- and high-speed conditions. The test results show that, at low speed, the resistance of the X-rudder submarine is smaller than that of the cross-rudder one at the same rudder angle. In contrast, at high speed, the resistance of the cross-rudder submarine is smaller than that of the X-rudder submarine. Under low- and high-speed conditions, the X-rudder’s lateral steering force and yaw moment are larger than those of the cross rudder at the same rudder angle. The superiority of the maneuverability of the X-rudder becomes more apparent with increasing rudder angle. At a rudder angle of 10°, the X-rudder’s lateral steering force and yaw moment are about two times larger than the cross rudder’s. In the small-radius area of the propeller plane, the inhomogeneity coefficient of the X-rudder is generally smaller than that of the cross rudder. This is probably because the cross-rudder stern control surfaces have fixed stabilizers with flaps, and the X-rudder stern control surfaces are all-moving, with a small fixed part next to the submarine. This test provides a reference for designing the stern control surface of low-noise submarines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ship Structures II)
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21 pages, 7246 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Ship Hull Ultimate Strength under Fire Conditions: The Fire Smith Method Approach
by Jiaxin Wu, ZhiPeng Du, Ming Yan and Xingwei Sun
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(11), 2055; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11112055 - 27 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 949
Abstract
This article presents the fire Smith method, which integrates the plate model and the Smith method, to analyze the impact of fire temperature and extent on the buckling strength of frigates. This investigation focused on the frigate’s buckling strength and how it is [...] Read more.
This article presents the fire Smith method, which integrates the plate model and the Smith method, to analyze the impact of fire temperature and extent on the buckling strength of frigates. This investigation focused on the frigate’s buckling strength and how it is affected by a fire, achieved by modifying both deck temperature and area. Leveraging the principle of oxygen consumption, a coefficient “D” was introduced to account for fire temperature and region variations. This enabled the characterization of buckling strength under varying temperature and regional conditions through 64 simulations conducted on a frigate model. The outcomes revealed that the disparity between simulation results and the fire Smith method remained below 10%, establishing a solid basis for engineering assessment. As the high-temperature area decreased and necessitated less oxygen, the ultimate strength initiated a decline. However, upon reaching a certain threshold temperature, the ultimate strength stabilized. Conversely, expansive high-temperature zones caused a decline in ultimate strength, coupled with an increased oxygen requirement. Under consistent oxygen consumption conditions, the rate of ultimate strength reduction intensified. Consequently, these divergent characteristics of ultimate strength in various high-temperature areas underscored that minimizing the expansive fire high-temperature zones can significantly enhance the ship’s fire resistance, safeguarding its structural integrity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ship Structures II)
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17 pages, 14880 KiB  
Article
Tensile Response of Fibre-Reinforced Plastics Produced by Additive Manufacturing for Marine Applications
by Simone Scattareggia Marchese, Gabriella Epasto, Vincenzo Crupi and Yordan Garbatov
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(2), 334; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11020334 - 3 Feb 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1696
Abstract
The present study makes a consistent attempt to evaluate promising additive manufacturing (AM) processes and materials for marine structural applications, paving the way for the development of additively manufactured light-weight composites. The main objective is to analyse the structural performances of fibre-reinforced plastics [...] Read more.
The present study makes a consistent attempt to evaluate promising additive manufacturing (AM) processes and materials for marine structural applications, paving the way for the development of additively manufactured light-weight composites. The main objective is to analyse the structural performances of fibre-reinforced plastics (FRP) produced by AM for marine applications. In particular, the tensile response of chopped and continuous carbon-fibre-reinforced thermoplastics have been investigated through destructive and non-destructive testing, considering the influence of AM process settings and thermal post-manufacturing treatments. The results demonstrate that continuous fibre-reinforced thermoplastics produced by AM are potentially suited to marine structural applications, since their tensile capacity is superior to the minimum imposed by the Classification Society Rules. However, the mechanical properties of additively manufactured FRP are currently lower than conventional composites. The continuous carbon fibre reinforcement is far more effective than the chopped one, and the additive manufacturing deposition pattern significantly influences the structural capacity. The annealing post-manufacturing treatment enhances the mechanical properties by approximately 10%, decreasing material ductility and manufacturing defects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ship Structures II)
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19 pages, 4188 KiB  
Article
A Wave Directionality and a Within-Year Wave Climate Variability Effects on the Long-Term Extreme Significant Wave Heights Prediction in the Adriatic Sea
by Antonio Mikulić and Joško Parunov
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(1), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11010042 - 28 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1225
Abstract
The extreme significant wave height predictions often neglect within-year wave climate variability and wave directionality. Depending on a geographical region, local wind patterns and year climate variability could have an influence on the long-term prediction of waves. The Adriatic Sea having two dominant [...] Read more.
The extreme significant wave height predictions often neglect within-year wave climate variability and wave directionality. Depending on a geographical region, local wind patterns and year climate variability could have an influence on the long-term prediction of waves. The Adriatic Sea having two dominant wind patterns of different characteristics, Bura and Jugo, is a great example for the case study. The 23-year hindcast wave data used in the presented study is extracted from the WorldWaves database. Based on wind and wave data, annual extreme significant wave heights generated by different wind patterns and for different months are fitted by Gumbel distribution using maximum likelihood estimation. Combined long-term extremes are then predicted by calculating system probability. It was found that considering the wave directionality, and especially the seasonality of wave climate, leads to a larger prediction of extreme significant wave heights. The extreme value prediction considering wave directionality on average yields 4% larger significant wave heights, while considering within-year climate variability leads to, on average, 8% larger extremes compared to the predictions when both effects are neglected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ship Structures II)
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15 pages, 4570 KiB  
Article
Crack Growth in Ni-Cr-Mo-V Steel Using ΔCTOD Elastic–Plastic Model
by Jingxia Yue, Jiankang Lei, Yordan Garbatov and Ke Yang
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(12), 1944; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10121944 - 8 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1395
Abstract
Many studies have shown that the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) method based on the stress intensity factor range (ΔK) has limitations that cannot be ignored. Due to neglecting the influence of plastic deformation near the crack tip, LEFM shows apparent [...] Read more.
Many studies have shown that the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) method based on the stress intensity factor range (ΔK) has limitations that cannot be ignored. Due to neglecting the influence of plastic deformation near the crack tip, LEFM shows apparent deviations in evaluating the fracture behaviour. Therefore, in this study, the crack tip opening displacement range (ΔCTOD) is chosen as an alternative to ΔK and based on the elastic–plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) to develop a new fracture behaviour assessment approach for marine structures. Firstly, a ΔCTOD model based on the HRR (Hutchinson, Rice, and Rosengren) solution is proposed considering the crack closure effect. Secondly, a series of compact tension (CT) specimen crack growth experiments under constant amplitude loading is carried out. According to the experimental results, the prediction accuracy of the HRR model and traditional Irwin and Dugdale models is compared and analysed. The rationality of ΔCTOD as an alternative to ΔK is verified. The results show that ΔCTOD can describe the crack propagation behaviour well. The proposed HRR model shows better accuracy and a more comprehensive application range than the traditional models, which has a guiding significance for studying fracture behaviour for marine structural applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ship Structures II)
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18 pages, 4659 KiB  
Article
Fire Risk Assessment in Engine Rooms Considering the Fire-Induced Domino Effects
by Houyao Zhang, Chenfeng Li, Nan Zhao, Bai-Qiao Chen, Huilong Ren and Jichuan Kang
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(11), 1685; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10111685 - 7 Nov 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2849
Abstract
This paper proposes a dynamic evolutionary model to quantify the domino effect of ship engine room fires. Based on the spatial and temporal characteristics of fire accidents, the dynamic probability of the domino effect of multiple accident units is calculated using matrix calculation [...] Read more.
This paper proposes a dynamic evolutionary model to quantify the domino effect of ship engine room fires. Based on the spatial and temporal characteristics of fire accidents, the dynamic probability of the domino effect of multiple accident units is calculated using matrix calculation and Monte Carlo simulation. The uncertainties of shipboard personnel, automatic detection systems, sprinkler systems, and the synergistic effects of multiple escalation vectors from different units are addressed. The dynamic probability of the domino effect of multiple accident units is calculated, and a risk assessment of complex fire scenarios in ship engine rooms is implemented. This study also presents the model feasibility in terms of fire risk assessment in cabins with numerous pieces of equipment. The results indicate that 2 min and 4 min are vital time nodes for the development and spread of fires. The extinguishing work on key equipment in the path of the fire's spread can effectively restrain its further expansion. The results can provide critical references for ship fire prevention, fire suppression, and fire protection design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ship Structures II)
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