Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Sinus and Nasal Diseases

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Otolaryngology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2023) | Viewed by 11399

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Clinical Allergy Center, The First Affiliated Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China
Interests: allergic rhinitis; nasal polyps; tinnitus; SNPs; noncoding RNA; allergen immunotherapy; probiotics

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing TongRen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100730, China
2. Beijing Key Laboratory of Nasal Diseases, Beijing Institute of Otolaryngology, Beijing 100005, China
Interests: chronic rhinosinusitis; nasal polyps; allergic rhinitis; allergen immunotherapy; sinonasal inverted

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sinus and nasal diseases affect billions of people in the world, and account for more than one million outpatient visits a year, resulting in countless time lost. In the past, sinus surgery was invasive, often performed through external incisions, and thus was associated with significant pain. Today, a range of emerging skills have been applied in clinical practice, providing doctors with new insights and methods to treat this kind of disease.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to review current advances and controversies in the treatment of patients with sinus and nasal diseases, the effects of treatment on a patient’s quality of life, and the expansion of surgical and other approaches to sinus and nasal diseases.

Prof. Dr. Lei Cheng
Prof. Dr. Chengshuo Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • chronic rhinosinusitis
  • nasal polyps
  • allergic and nonallergic rhinitis
  • olfactory disorders
  • sinonasal inverted papilloma
  • sinonasal malignancies
  • endoscopic sinus surgery
  • biologic therapy

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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5 pages, 212 KiB  
Editorial
Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Sinus and Nasal Diseases: Surgical Challenges and Therapeutic Perspectives
by Xiao-Ying Zhao, Ming Chen and Lei Cheng
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(4), 1485; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12041485 - 13 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1664
Abstract
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), one of the most prevalent health problems worldwide, is defined as a chronic inflammation of the nasal and paranasal sinuses mucosa persisting for more than 12 weeks [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Sinus and Nasal Diseases)
4 pages, 206 KiB  
Editorial
Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Sinus and Nasal Diseases: A Promising Future in the Appropriate Therapies
by Lin Lin and Lei Cheng
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(24), 7398; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11247398 - 14 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 998
Abstract
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is an inflammatory condition of the nose and paranasal sinuses defined by clinical symptoms, including two or more symptoms, one of which should be either nasal blockage or nasal discharge with or without facial pain/pressure or reduction in/loss of sense [...] Read more.
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is an inflammatory condition of the nose and paranasal sinuses defined by clinical symptoms, including two or more symptoms, one of which should be either nasal blockage or nasal discharge with or without facial pain/pressure or reduction in/loss of sense of smell [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Sinus and Nasal Diseases)

Research

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11 pages, 1408 KiB  
Article
Is There a Correlation between Endoscopic Sinus Surgery and Improvement in Erectile Dysfunction?
by Antonio Romano, Umberto Committeri, Vincenzo Abbate, Marco Sarcinella, Francesco Maffia, Simona Barone, Stefania Troise, Giovanni Salzano, Riccardo Nocini, Paola Bonavolontà and Giovanni Dell’Aversana Orabona
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(20), 6626; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12206626 - 19 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1426
Abstract
Background: In recent years, the focus on respiratory disorders has increased, notably on chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), an inflammatory condition of the upper airway that can significantly impact one’s quality of life. Interestingly, CRS has emerged as a potential comorbidity in erectile dysfunction (ED). [...] Read more.
Background: In recent years, the focus on respiratory disorders has increased, notably on chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), an inflammatory condition of the upper airway that can significantly impact one’s quality of life. Interestingly, CRS has emerged as a potential comorbidity in erectile dysfunction (ED). This study aims to assess the impact of endoscopic sinus surgery for CRS on sexual function. Materials and Methods: The authors conducted a prospective study of patients who visited their clinics for chronic rhinosinusitis between June 2018 and June 2022. The study involved 53 patients aged between 40 and 70 years who were treated for CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). Preoperative and postoperative assessments were performed using the Nasal Obstruction Symptoms Evaluation Score (NOSE score) and the 5th International Index of Erectile Function Score (IIEF-5 score) to evaluate potential improvements in sexual function following endoscopic sinus surgery. Results: Before surgery, the average NOSE score was 72.6, which decreased to 24.9 postoperatively. The average preoperative IIEF-5 score was 16.35, while the postoperative average increased to 19.52. Statistical analysis revealed a significant improvement in erectile function for penetration (p-value = 0.024) and overall satisfaction after intercourse (p-value < 0.001) regarding the degree of nasal obstruction. Conclusion: This study underscores the potential benefits of treating chronic obstructive upper airway diseases such as sinusitis in improving the sexual outcomes of patients clinically diagnosed with erectile dysfunction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Sinus and Nasal Diseases)
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15 pages, 473 KiB  
Article
Factors Influencing Recurrence after Surgical Treatment of Odontogenic Maxillary Sinusitis: An Analysis from the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Point of View
by Andreas Sakkas, Christel Weiß, Marcel Ebeling, Sebastian Pietzka, Frank Wilde, Theo Evers, Oliver Christian Thiele, Robert Andreas Mischkowski and Mario Scheurer
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(11), 3670; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12113670 - 25 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1066
Abstract
The aim of the study was to determine the factors influencing the development of recurrence after the surgical treatment of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in an oral and maxillofacial surgery clinic over a 7-year period. Demographic and anamnesis data, clinical and radiological findings, treatment [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to determine the factors influencing the development of recurrence after the surgical treatment of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis in an oral and maxillofacial surgery clinic over a 7-year period. Demographic and anamnesis data, clinical and radiological findings, treatment and outcome were analyzed. A multivariable analysis was performed to find associations between patient age, causative focus, surgical access for sinus revision, multilayer closure with a buccal fat pad, inferior meatal antrostomy (IMA) for temporary sinus drainage and sinusitis recurrence. A total of 164 patients with a mean age of 51.7 years were included. Sinusitis recurrence was observed in nine patients (5.48%) within 6 months after primary surgery. No significant correlation was detected between patient age, causative focus, surgical access for sinus revision, multilayer closure with a buccal fat pad, IMA for sinus drainage and the development of recurrence (p > 0.05). Patients with a history of antiresorptive-related osteonecrosis of the jaw showed a significant tendency toward disease recurrence (p = 0.0375). In conclusion, except for antiresorptive administration, none of the investigated variables were related to a higher risk of sinusitis recurrence. We encourage a combined approach of intraoral removal of the infective focus and sinus drainage via FESS, as well as an individual treatment decision in a multidisciplinary setting with collaboration between dentistry, maxillofacial surgery and otorhinolaryngology to avoid sinusitis recurrence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Sinus and Nasal Diseases)
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9 pages, 1062 KiB  
Article
Identifying Residual Psychological Symptoms after Nasal Reconstruction Surgery in Patients with Empty Nose Syndrome
by Chien-Chia Huang, Pei-Wen Wu, Chi-Che Huang, Po-Hung Chang, Chia-Hsiang Fu and Ta-Jen Lee
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(7), 2635; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12072635 - 31 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1665
Abstract
Background: Empty nose syndrome (ENS) is a syndrome of paradoxical nasal obstruction that is thought to be mostly caused by inappropriate turbinate procedures. This study aimed to investigate depression- and anxiety-associated psychological symptoms in patients with ENS before and after surgical reconstruction, and [...] Read more.
Background: Empty nose syndrome (ENS) is a syndrome of paradoxical nasal obstruction that is thought to be mostly caused by inappropriate turbinate procedures. This study aimed to investigate depression- and anxiety-associated psychological symptoms in patients with ENS before and after surgical reconstruction, and to compare them with those of control subjects. Methods: Patients with ENS were prospectively enrolled. The Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-25 (SNOT-25), Empty Nose Syndrome 6-item questionnaire (ENS6Q), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) were used to evaluate the participants before and after reconstruction surgery with submucosal Medpor implantation (Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI), as well as control subjects at enrollment. Results: Forty patients with ENS and forty age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Patients with ENS experienced significant improvement in SNOT-25, ENS6Q, BDI-II, and BAI scores after surgery, but all were significantly greater than those in the control group. Nine patients with ENS (22.5%) had postoperative residual psychological symptoms. Preoperative BDI-II and BAI scores were significant predictors of postoperative residual psychological symptoms. The optimal cut-off value was BDI-II > 28.5 (sensitivity, 77.8%; specificity, 77.4%) in receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Conclusions: The nasal and psychological evaluations in patients with ENS significantly improved after nasal reconstruction surgery, but both were significantly greater than those in the control group. Identifying individuals who may experience postoperative residual symptoms and providing a multimodal approach, including surgical reconstruction and psychiatric treatment, are suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Sinus and Nasal Diseases)
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Review

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18 pages, 1543 KiB  
Review
Therapeutic Strategies to Prevent the Recurrence of Nasal Polyps after Surgical Treatment: An Update and In Vitro Study on Growth Inhibition of Fibroblasts
by Angela Rizzi, Luca Gammeri, Raffaele Cordiano, Mariagrazia Valentini, Michele Centrone, Sabino Marrone, Riccardo Inchingolo, Franziska Michaela Lohmeyer, Carlo Cavaliere, Francesco Ria, Gabriella Cadoni, Sebastiano Gangemi and Eleonora Nucera
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(8), 2841; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12082841 - 13 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3865
Abstract
Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is the most bothersome phenotype of chronic rhinosinusitis, which is typically characterized by a Type 2 inflammatory reaction, comorbidities and high rates of nasal polyp recurrence, causing severe impact on quality of life. Nasal polyp recurrence rates, [...] Read more.
Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is the most bothersome phenotype of chronic rhinosinusitis, which is typically characterized by a Type 2 inflammatory reaction, comorbidities and high rates of nasal polyp recurrence, causing severe impact on quality of life. Nasal polyp recurrence rates, defined as the number of patients undergoing revision endoscopic sinus surgery, are 20% within a 5 year period after surgery. The cornerstone of CRSwNP management consists of anti-inflammatory treatment with local corticosteroids. We performed a literature review regarding the therapeutic strategies used to prevent nasal polyp recurrence after surgical treatment. Finally, we report an in vitro study evaluating the efficacy of lysine–acetylsalicylic acid and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ketoprofen and diclofenac) on the proliferation of fibroblasts, obtained from nasal polyp tissue samples. Our study demonstrates that diclofenac, even more so than lysine–acetylsalicylic acid, significantly inhibits fibroblast proliferation and could be considered a valid therapeutic strategy in preventing CRSwNP recurrence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current and Emerging Treatment Options in Sinus and Nasal Diseases)
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