Innovative Sample Pretreatment and Detection Techniques for Foods

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 May 2024 | Viewed by 1723

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Food Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Finance and Economics, Nanjing 210023, China
Interests: rapid food safety sensing; electrochemical analysis; surface-enhance Raman spectroscopy; near-infrared spectroscopy; chemometrics; imaging technique
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Food Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266003, China
Interests: food quality detection; non-destructive detection techniques; optical sensing techniques; Raman spectroscopy; laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy; chemometrics; nanosensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the rapid advancement of economic globalization, food safety issues have become increasingly prevalent, posing a significant threat to public health. Throughout the production, processing, and distribution of food, numerous endogenous and exogenous food safety concerns can arise. For instance, contaminants such as pesticides, veterinary drugs, heavy metals, and persistent organic pollutants may affect animals and plants as they grow. Meanwhile, the curing, roasting, and fermentation processes of meat can lead to the formation of harmful substances (such as N-dimethylnitrosamines, heterocyclic amines, acrylamides, and biogenic amines). Furthermore, due to their high protein and moisture content, many seafood products are highly susceptible to spoilage during storage and transportation. Therefore, the development of innovative sample pre-treatment and analytical techniques is imperative to safeguard the quality and safety of food.

This Special Issue aims to invite contributions that showcase the latest advancements in technologies applied to the extraction and purification of chemical contaminants in food, as well as innovative detection methods used for the analysis of food quality and safety. Topics of interest for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Metal and covalent organic frameworks surrounding materials;
  2. Solid-phase extraction techniques;
  3. QuEChERS methods;
  4. Spectroscopy techniques;
  5. Nanomaterial-based sensors;
  6. Electrochemical detection techniques;
  7. Chromatographic techniques.

Dr. Weiwei Cheng
Dr. Kaiqiang Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • foods
  • sample pre-treatment
  • nanomaterials
  • biosensors
  • food detection

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

21 pages, 2489 KiB  
Article
Fatty Acids and Starch Identification within Minute Archaeological Fragments: Qualitative Investigation for Assessing Feasibility
by Roberto Ordoñez-Araque, Luis Ramos-Guerrero, Paul Vargas-Jentzsch, Martha Romero-Bastidas, Nicolás Rodríguez-Herrera, Rubén Vallejo-Holguín, Camila Fuentes-Gualotuña and Jenny Ruales
Foods 2024, 13(7), 1090; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13071090 - 2 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1527
Abstract
Within the realm of archaeology, the analysis of biomolecules assumes significant importance in elucidating historical dietary patterns and their implications for contemporary contexts. To achieve this, knowledge and tools of both chemistry and archaeology are essential to yield objective outcomes and conduct analyses [...] Read more.
Within the realm of archaeology, the analysis of biomolecules assumes significant importance in elucidating historical dietary patterns and their implications for contemporary contexts. To achieve this, knowledge and tools of both chemistry and archaeology are essential to yield objective outcomes and conduct analyses of archaeological materials for the detection of biomolecules. Usually, only minuscule remnants of ceramic fragments are retrieved from excavations, which limits the feasibility of comprehensive laboratory analysis. This study aimed to establish a protocol for analyzing fatty acids and starch from archaeological food utensils with minimal sample quantities. Various experiments were conducted to replicate preparations that might have occurred in archaeological vessels, aiming to establish the optimal protocol. The analyses were performed using clay griddles, subjecting vegetable oil to varying temperatures for fatty acid assessment. For starch analysis, a series of experiments encompassed diverse forms of potato preparations (pulp, chuño, tortilla, carbonization, and freeze-drying) and maize (flour, tortilla, and carbonization). The verification of the experiments was confirmed by conducting identical analyses, as developed in the current study, on authentic archaeological fragments. The principal outcomes of this investigation include the successful extraction of both types of biomolecules using only 0.25 g of the sample, obtained through direct scraping from the vessel. Soxhlet extraction was identified as the most efficient strategy to recover fatty acids. Additionally, a comprehensive protocol for the identification of starch extraction was developed. This study has, for the first time, elucidated two detailed methodologies for the extraction of fatty acids and starch in scenarios in which researchers can obtain limited quantities of archaeological food utensil fragments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Sample Pretreatment and Detection Techniques for Foods)
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