Milk and Dairy Products: Structure, Digestion, and Properties

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2024) | Viewed by 5414

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Dairy Science, Ministry of Education, Northeast Agricultural University, No. 600 Changjiang St., Xiangfang District, Harbin 150030, China
Interests: milk; infant formula; cheese; functional foods; lipid digestion; emulsifying stability; nutrition; food chemistry

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Food Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China
Interests: dairy characteristics evaluation; functional ingredients processing; fermented dairy products processing; probiotics breeding and application
Food College, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, China
Interests: dairy science and technology; cheese; infant formula; functional dairy products

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Milk and dairy products are rich in high-quality protein, fat, lactose, minerals, vitamins, and a variety of functional proteins and small-molecule active substances. As an important source of nutrition in daily life, dairy has an important effect on our health. At present, dairy products have been developed towards functionalization and health. Changes in composition or structural changes will also affect milk’s functional effects, including its digestive properties. However, the study of the structure, physicochemical properties, and nutritional functions of milk and dairy products has not previously been in-depth. This Special Issue aims to collect high-quality original articles or reviews on the latest developments and prospects in milk and dairy products. With this Special Issue, we hope to publish research results that will further promote people's understanding of milk composition and structural changes at the molecular level during food processing, and clarify its nutritional properties, thereby providing important suggestions for the development of milk and dairy products.

Prof. Dr. Xiaodong Li
Prof. Dr. Jiaping Lv
Dr. Lu Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • milk
  • dairy products 
  • composition 
  • structural changes 
  • in vitro digestion 
  • physical properties 
  • improving functions 
  • food processing 
  • food chemistry

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

17 pages, 3772 KiB  
Article
The Peptide Fractions of Cheddar Cheese Made with Lactobacillus helveticus 1.0612 Play Protective Effects in H2O2-Induced Oxidative-Damaged Caco-2 Cells Models
by Wanshuang Yang, Xiuxiu Zhang, Meng Sun, Yang Jiao, Xiaodong Li, Lu Liu and Zhong Wang
Foods 2023, 12(14), 2790; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12142790 - 22 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1022
Abstract
In this study, water-soluble peptide (WSP) fractions of cheddar cheese made with Lactobacillus helveticus 1.0612 were purified into WSP-Ⅰ (<3 kDa), WSP-Ⅱ (3–10 kDa), and WSP-Ⅲ (>10 kDa). The protective effects of WSP, WSP-Ⅰ, WSP-Ⅱ, and WSP-Ⅲ fractions against oxidative stress in Caco-2 [...] Read more.
In this study, water-soluble peptide (WSP) fractions of cheddar cheese made with Lactobacillus helveticus 1.0612 were purified into WSP-Ⅰ (<3 kDa), WSP-Ⅱ (3–10 kDa), and WSP-Ⅲ (>10 kDa). The protective effects of WSP, WSP-Ⅰ, WSP-Ⅱ, and WSP-Ⅲ fractions against oxidative stress in Caco-2 cells were assayed, and the cytoprotective mechanism of WSP-Ⅰ on cells oxidative damage was elucidated via metabolomics. The results showed that all four peptide fractions were able to attenuate the decrease in cell viability caused by oxidative stress and also could reduce the production of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde caused by oxidative stress, and increased cellular catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, thereby enhancing cellular antioxidant capacity. The WSP-Ⅰ fraction with the highest protective effect was used for metabolomics analysis, and 15 significantly different metabolites were screened. Functional pathway analysis revealed that the protective effect of the WSP-I fraction was related with nine metabolic pathways and weakened the metabolic disorders caused by H2O2 via regulating energy metabolism and amino acid metabolism. All in all, peptide fractions of cheddar cheese showed a cytoprotective effect through improved cellular metabolism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Milk and Dairy Products: Structure, Digestion, and Properties)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 2872 KiB  
Article
The Microstructure, Rheological Characteristics, and Digestibility Properties of Binary or Ternary Mixture Systems of Gelatinized Potato Starch/Milk Protein/Soybean Oil during the In Vitro Digestion Process
by Yufang Guan, Watcharaporn Toommuangpak, Guohua Zhao and Siwatt Thaiudom
Foods 2023, 12(13), 2451; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12132451 - 22 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1037
Abstract
The in vitro digestibility of potato starch-based foods interacting with milk protein and soybean oil was investigated. Microstructures and rheological changes upon digestion were determined. The results showed that the addition of milk proteins (casein and whey protein) promoted gelatinized potato starch digestion, [...] Read more.
The in vitro digestibility of potato starch-based foods interacting with milk protein and soybean oil was investigated. Microstructures and rheological changes upon digestion were determined. The results showed that the addition of milk proteins (casein and whey protein) promoted gelatinized potato starch digestion, while soybean oil slowed down gelatinized potato starch digestion. A mixture of soybean oil and milk protein promoted the digestion of milk protein, while a mixture of gelatinized potato starch and milk protein inhibited the digestion of milk protein. The mixture of milk protein and/or gelatinized potato starch with soybean oil promoted the release of free fatty acids in soybean oil. The highest release rate of free fatty acids was attained by a mix of milk protein and soybean oil. The mixed samples were digested and observed with a confocal laser scanning microscope. The viscosity of the digestates was determined by a rheometer. Overall, the results demonstrated that the addition of milk protein and soybean oil had an effect on the in vitro digestibility of gelatinized potato starch and its microstructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Milk and Dairy Products: Structure, Digestion, and Properties)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 12747 KiB  
Article
Changes in Sensory Properties, Physico-Chemical Characteristics, and Aromas of Ras Cheese under Different Coating Techniques
by Dina A. Amer, Abdinn A. M. Albadri, Hanaa A. El-Hamshary, Yasser Nehela, Abeer H. Makhlouf, Mohamed Y. El-Hawary and Sameh A. Awad
Foods 2023, 12(10), 2023; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12102023 - 17 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1600
Abstract
Ras cheese is one of the main hard cheeses in Egypt and is well-known worldwide. Herein, we investigated the potential effects of different coating techniques on the physico-chemical characteristics, sensory properties, and aroma-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of Ras cheese over a six-month [...] Read more.
Ras cheese is one of the main hard cheeses in Egypt and is well-known worldwide. Herein, we investigated the potential effects of different coating techniques on the physico-chemical characteristics, sensory properties, and aroma-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of Ras cheese over a six-month ripening period. Four coating techniques were tested, including (I) uncoated Ras cheese (the benchmark control), (II) Ras cheese coated with paraffin wax (T1), (III) Ras cheese coated with a plastic film under a vacuum (PFUV; T2), and (IV) Ras cheese coated with a plastic film treated with natamycin (T3). Although none of the treatments significantly affected the salt content, Ras cheese coated with a plastic film treated with natamycin (T3) slightly reduced the moisture content over the ripening period. Moreover, our findings revealed that while T3 had the highest ash content, it showed the same positive correlation profiles of fat content, total nitrogen, and acidity % as the control cheese sample, indicating no significant effect on the physico-chemical characteristics of the coated cheese. Furthermore, there were significant differences in the composition of VOCs among all tested treatments. The control cheese sample had the lowest percentage of other VOCs. T1 cheese, coated with paraffin wax, had the highest percentage of other volatile compounds. T2 and T3 were quite similar in their VOC profiles. According to our GC-MS findings, thirty-five VOCs were identified in Ras cheese treatments after six months of ripening, including twenty-three fatty acids, six esters, three alcohols, and three other compounds identified in most treatments. T2 cheese had the highest fatty acid % and T3 cheese had the highest ester %. The development of volatile compounds was affected by the coating material and the ripening period of the cheeses, which played a major role in the quantity and quality of volatile compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Milk and Dairy Products: Structure, Digestion, and Properties)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 1734 KiB  
Article
Identification of Marker Peptides for the Whey Protein Quantification in Edam-Type Cheese
by Tobias von Oesen, Mascha Treblin, Ingrid Clawin-Rädecker, Dierk Martin, Ronald Maul, Wolfgang Hoffmann, Katrin Schrader, Benjamin Wegner, Katja Bode, Ralf Zink, Sascha Rohn and Jan Fritsche
Foods 2023, 12(10), 2002; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12102002 - 15 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1126
Abstract
Several technologies are available for incorporating whey proteins into a cheese matrix. However, there is no valid analytical method available to determine the whey protein content in matured cheese, to date. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to develop a liquid [...] Read more.
Several technologies are available for incorporating whey proteins into a cheese matrix. However, there is no valid analytical method available to determine the whey protein content in matured cheese, to date. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to develop a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of individual whey proteins based on specific marker peptides (‘bottom-up’ proteomic approach). Therefore, the whey protein-enriched model of the Edam-type cheese was produced in a pilot plant and on an industrial scale. Tryptic hydrolysis experiments were performed to evaluate the suitability of identified potential marker peptides (PMPs) for α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG). Based on the findings, α-LA and β-LG appeared to be resistant to proteolytic degradation during six weeks of ripening and no influence on the PMP was observed. Good levels of linearity (R2 > 0.9714), repeatability (CVs < 5%), and recovery rate (80% to 120%) were determined for most PMPs. However, absolute quantification with external peptide and protein standards revealed differences in model cheese depending on the PMP, e.g., 0.50% ± 0.02% to 5.31% ± 0.25% for β-LG. As protein spiking prior to hydrolysis revealed differing digestion behavior of whey proteins, further studies are required to enable valid quantification in various cheese types. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Milk and Dairy Products: Structure, Digestion, and Properties)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop