Qualitative and Quantitative Methods to Evaluate Food Component

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 3450

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA
Interests: analytical separations and mass spectrometry; LC-MS; GC-MS; CE-MS and SFC-MS

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of qualitative and quantitative methods for food analysis is increasingly seen as a tool to protect consumer health by preventing exposure to toxic food and the occurrence of diseases. New, improved, and reliable analytical methods based on chromatography, electrophoresis, microchip technology, mass spectrometry, and spectroscopy are continuously needed to understand food authentication and quality assessment. In addition, these analytical methods provide awareness of toxic chemicals (pesticides, natural toxins, and metals) and contaminants (acrylamide, furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) that are present in the food, increasing environmental concerns. Thus, allowing reliable analytical methods in food safety and the screening of food products will help deliver safe and healthy food to the human population.

We would like to invite researchers to submit unpublished original manuscripts on qualitative and quantitative analytical methods to evaluate food components for publication in this Special Issue. The topics covered by this Issue include, but are not restricted to, the following:

  • Analytical methods of declared and undeclared novel ingredients in food, feed, and beverages using liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC), supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), chip-based miniaturized techniques combined with detection (mass spectrometry (MS)), and other detection systems;
  • Analytical methods of food ingredients for food quality, safety, and authenticity;
  • Atomic spectroscopy (atomic absorption, atomic emission, and inductively coupled plasma), molecular spectroscopy (UV-Vis, NMR, fluorescence), and mass spectrometric methods for the detection of food ingredients or food components;
  • Analytical methods for bioactive molecules and small molecules in food;
  • Food toxicity and foodomics.

Prof. Dr. Shahab A. Shamsi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food ingredients/food fingerprinting
  • authenticity, safety, and traceability
  • separation and detection of declared and undeclared novel ingredients in foods
  • quantitation of declared and undeclared novel ingredients in foods
  • molecular spectroscopy method analysis and biotechnological solutions
  • HPLC-MS and HPLC-MS/MS methods for food analysis
  • GC-MS, GC-IMS, and GC-MS/MS methods for food analysis
  • CE, CE-MS, and CE-MS/MS methods for food analysis
  • foodomics, food safety, and food bioactivity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 3234 KiB  
Article
Detection and Analysis of VOCs in Cherry Tomato Based on GC-MS and GC×GC-TOF MS Techniques
by Sihui Guan, Chenxu Liu, Zhuping Yao, Hongjian Wan, Meiying Ruan, Rongqing Wang, Qingjing Ye, Zhimiao Li, Guozhi Zhou and Yuan Cheng
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1279; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081279 - 22 Apr 2024
Viewed by 715
Abstract
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a significant role in influencing the flavor quality of cherry tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme). The scarcity of systematic analysis of VOCs in cherry tomatoes can be attributed to the constraints imposed by detection technology and other [...] Read more.
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a significant role in influencing the flavor quality of cherry tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme). The scarcity of systematic analysis of VOCs in cherry tomatoes can be attributed to the constraints imposed by detection technology and other contributing factors. In this study, the cherry tomato cultivar var. ‘Zheyingfen1’ was chosen due to its abundant fruit flavor. Two detection technology platforms, namely the commonly employed headspace solid-phase microextraction—gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) and the most advanced headspace solid-phase microextraction—full two-dimensional gas chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC×GC-TOFMS), were employed in the analysis. The VOCs of cherry tomato cultivar var. ‘Zheyingfen1’ fruits at red ripening stage were detected. A combined total of 1544 VOCs were detected using the two aforementioned techniques. Specifically, 663 VOCs were identified by through the HS-SPME-GC-MS method, 1026 VOCs were identified by through the HS-SPME-GC×GC-TOFMS, and 145 VOCs were identified by both techniques. The identification of β-ionone and (E)-2-nonenal as the principal VOCs was substantiated through the application of the relative odor activity value (rOAV) calculation and subsequent analysis. Based on the varying contribution rates of rOAV, the analysis of sensory flavor characteristics revealed that cherry tomato cultivar var. ‘Zheyingfen1’ predominantly exhibited green and fatty attributes, accompanied by elements of fresh and floral flavor characteristics. In conclusion, our study conducted a comprehensive comparison of the disparities between these two methodologies in detecting VOCs in cherry tomato fruits. Additionally, we systematically analyzed the VOC composition and sensory flavor attributes of the cherry tomato cultivar var. ‘Zheyingfen1’. This research serves as a significant point of reference for investigating the regulatory mechanisms underlying the development of volatile flavor quality in cherry tomatoes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative and Quantitative Methods to Evaluate Food Component)
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Review

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15 pages, 548 KiB  
Review
A General Review of Methodologies Used in the Determination of Cholesterol (C27H46O) Levels in Foods
by Ashwell R. Ndhlala, Arzu Kavaz Yüksel, Neslihan Çelebi and Hülya Öztürk Doğan
Foods 2023, 12(24), 4424; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12244424 - 10 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1648
Abstract
Cholesterol (C27H46O) is a lipid-derived substance found in lipoproteins and cell membranes. It is also one of the main sources for the production of bile acids, vitamin D, and steroid hormones. Today, foods are evaluated by consumers not only [...] Read more.
Cholesterol (C27H46O) is a lipid-derived substance found in lipoproteins and cell membranes. It is also one of the main sources for the production of bile acids, vitamin D, and steroid hormones. Today, foods are evaluated by consumers not only according to their taste and nutritional content but also according to their effects on consumer health. For example, many consumers choose foods according to their cholesterol level. The cholesterol in the food can directly affect the blood cholesterol level when consumed, which can lead to cardiovascular diseases. High levels of cholesterol can lead to diet-related human diseases such as cardiac arrest, paralysis, type II diabetes, and cerebral hemorrhage. In societies with high living standards, interest in and consumption of foods that lower or have low cholesterol levels have increased recently. Accordingly, efforts to increase the variety of foods with reduced cholesterol levels are on the rise. This has indirectly led to the accurate measurement of cholesterol levels in blood and food being of great importance. Classical chemical, enzymatic, colorimetric, polarographic, chromatographic, and spectrophotometric methods; enzymatic, nonenzymatic, and electrochemical sensors; and biosensors are used for the determination of cholesterol in foods. The purpose of this review is to reveal and explore current and future trends in cholesterol detection methods in foods. This review will summarize the most appropriate and standard methods for measuring cholesterol in biological components and foods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Qualitative and Quantitative Methods to Evaluate Food Component)
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