Developing Smart Encapsulation Technologies for the Delivery of Food Functional Ingredients

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Packaging and Preservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2024) | Viewed by 778

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Environmental and Life Sciences, College of Engineering, Science and Environment, The University of Newcastle (UON), Brush Road, Ourimbah, NSW 2258, Australia
Interests: food bioprocessing; encapsulation for nutrient delivery; food waste valorization
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is a great pleasure to introduce this Special Issue of Foods, entitled “Developing Smart Encapsulation Technologies for the Delivery of Food Functional Ingredients.”

In accordance with the needs of modern society, the consumption of functional foods has become an integral part of consumers' lifestyles. The incorporation of specific functional ingredients into food products is a particularly challenging and interesting part of the research and development of new functional products. The encapsulation of bioactive ingredients has been proven to be a promising approach to overcoming the difficulties associated with the susceptibility of these compounds to degradation during processing or storage and enhancing their bioavailability and target-related function.

This Special Issue aims to provide an overview of up-to-date encapsulation and delivery systems with direct applicability to food products. In particular, we seek original research articles and reviews on novel approaches for the encapsulation and delivery of core materials, novel encapsulation materials, the physicochemical characterization of the encapsulation systems, the inclusion of encapsulates in real-food applications and novel uses of encapsulates. Topics of interest include (but are not limited to) the following:

Preparation techniques;

Encapsulation materials;

Storage behavior;

Applications of encapsulates.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Taiwo Akanbi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • encapsulation materials
  • encapsulation technologies
  • delivery systems
  • functional food
  • functional ingredients

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 1710 KiB  
Article
Effect of Amine, Carboxyl, or Thiol Functionalization of Mesoporous Silica Particles on Their Efficiency as a Quercetin Delivery System in Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions
by Alexis Matadamas-Ortiz, Juan F. Pérez-Robles, Rosalía Reynoso-Camacho, Silvia L. Amaya-Llano, Aldo Amaro-Reyes, Prospero Di Pierro and Carlos Regalado-González
Foods 2024, 13(8), 1208; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13081208 - 16 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Quercetin (Q) dietary supplements exhibit poor oral bioavailability because of degradation throughout gastrointestinal digestion (GD), which may be overcome using mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) as an oral delivery system (ODS). This study aimed to elucidate the effect of the functionalization of MSPs with [...] Read more.
Quercetin (Q) dietary supplements exhibit poor oral bioavailability because of degradation throughout gastrointestinal digestion (GD), which may be overcome using mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) as an oral delivery system (ODS). This study aimed to elucidate the effect of the functionalization of MSPs with amine-(A-MSP), carboxyl-(C-MSP), or thiol-(T-MSP) groups on their efficiency as a quercetin ODS (QODS). The type and degree of functionalization (DF) were used as factors in an experimental design. The Q-loaded F-MSP (F-MSP/Q) was characterized by gas physisorption analysis, loading capacity (LC), and dynamic light scattering and kinetics of Q release at gastric and intestinal pHs. Antioxidant capacity and Q concentration of media containing F-MSP/Q were evaluated after simulated GD. A-MSP showed the highest LC (19.79 ± 2.42%). C-MSP showed the lowest particle size at pH 1.5 or 7.4 (≈200 nm). T-MSP exhibited the maximum Q release at pH 7.4 (11.43%). High DF of A-MSP increased Q retention, regardless of pH. A-MSP preserved antioxidant capacity of Q-released gastric media (58.95 ± 3.34%). Nonetheless, MSP and F-MSP did not protect antioxidant properties of Q released in intestinal conditions. C-MSP and T-MSP showed essential features for cellular uptake and Q release within cells that need to be assessed. Full article
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