Bioactive Proteins and Peptides Derived from Foods: Biochemistry, Functionality and Nutrition

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Physics and (Bio)Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1970

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Food and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
Interests: bioactive peptides; protein; bioinformatics; bioavailability; microcapsules; gut microbiota; probiotics

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Food and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
Interests: bioactive peptides; protein; umami peptide
School of Food Science and Biotechnology, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Interests: antimicrobial peptides; marine proteins; bioavailability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food-derived proteins and peptides not only serve as a fundamental nutrients for humans but also provide some properties that promote human health, meaning that they can have important roles during food processing based on their specific biochemistry characteristics. This Special Issue welcomes studies focusing on the following topics: (1) the activity and bioavailability of food-derived peptides and proteins, (2) the emerging technologies used in the research of peptides and proteins, (3) the application of peptides and proteins in food industries, (4) the exploration of novel sources regarding bioactive peptide and proteins, (5) the rapid screening and detection of biopeptides and proteins. This Special Issue will provide an overview of the advancements in this field and present research conducted on food-derived proteins and peptides intended for use in the food industries.

Dr. Maolin Tu
Prof. Dr. Yali Dang
Dr. Jiarun Han
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive peptides
  • bioactive proteins
  • structure
  • active mechanisms
  • nutrition and function
  • bioavailability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 732 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Nutritional and Functional Properties of Protaetia brevitarsis Larvae and Isolated Soy Protein Mixtures as Alternative Protein Sources
by Eun-Chae Cho, Surin Ahn, Hyo-Jeong Hwang, Kyung-Ok Shin, Suwan Kim and Yean-Jung Choi
Foods 2024, 13(10), 1540; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13101540 - 15 May 2024
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Abstract
The growing demand for sustainable and alternative protein sources has spurred interest in insect-based and plant-based proteins. Protaetia brevitarsis (PB) larvae and isolated soy protein (ISP) are notable in this regard, offering potential health benefits and nutritional enhancements. We assessed the feasibility of [...] Read more.
The growing demand for sustainable and alternative protein sources has spurred interest in insect-based and plant-based proteins. Protaetia brevitarsis (PB) larvae and isolated soy protein (ISP) are notable in this regard, offering potential health benefits and nutritional enhancements. We assessed the feasibility of PB larvae and ISP mixtures as alternative food ingredients. Methods included the optimized purification and freeze-drying of PB larvae, extraction and refinement of legume proteins, physicochemical and antioxidant capacity evaluations, DPPH radical scavenging activity measurement, total phenolic and flavonoids content quantification, general component analysis, amino acid profiling using HPLC, fatty acid profiling through gas chromatography, and mineral content analysis using inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. The study found that certain PB:ISP ratios, particularly a 7:3 ratio, significantly improved the blend’s antioxidant capacity, as evidenced by DPPH scavenging activity. This ratio also impacted the nutritional profile by altering the mixture’s general components, with a notable increase in moisture, crude protein, and fiber and a decrease in crude fat and ash. Amino acid analysis revealed a balanced presence of essential and non-essential amino acids. The fatty acid profile was rich in unsaturated fatty acids, especially in certain ratios. Mineral analysis showed a complex interplay between PB larvae and ISP, with some minerals decreasing and others increasing in the blend. PB larvae and ISP mixtures have significant potential as alternative protein sources, offering a diversified nutritional profile and enhanced antioxidant properties. The 7:3 ratio of PB larvae to ISP has been shown to be particularly effective, suggesting that this ratio may offer an optimal balance for enhancing the overall nutritional quality of the mixture. This study sets the stage for future research to further explore and optimize the potential of these mixtures for human consumption while considering the challenges of consumer acceptance and long-term safety. Full article
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14 pages, 2207 KiB  
Article
Zein-Derived Peptides from Corn Promote the Proliferation of C2C12 Myoblasts via Crosstalk of mTORC1 and mTORC2 Signaling Pathways
by Mohammad Sadiq Amin, Binbin Yu, Dongjing Wu, Yujia Lu, Wei Wu, Jing Wang, Yuhao Zhang and Yu Fu
Foods 2024, 13(6), 919; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060919 - 18 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Dietary protein supplementation has emerged as a promising strategy in combating sarcopenia. Furthermore, searching for alternatives of animal proteins has been a hot topic. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of zein peptides on C2C12 myoblasts and explore [...] Read more.
Dietary protein supplementation has emerged as a promising strategy in combating sarcopenia. Furthermore, searching for alternatives of animal proteins has been a hot topic. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of zein peptides on C2C12 myoblasts and explore their potential molecular mechanisms. The proliferative, cell cycle, and anti-apoptotic activities of zein peptides were evaluated. Peptidomics analysis and transcriptome sequencing were employed to explore the structure-activity relationship and underlying molecular mechanisms. The results indicated that zein peptides (0.05–0.2 mg/mL) exerted a significant proliferation-promoting impact on C2C12 cells, via increasing cell viability by 33.37 to 42.39%. Furthermore, zein peptides significantly increased S phase proportion and decreased the apoptosis rate from 34.08% (model group) to 28.96% in C2C12 cells. In addition, zein peptides exhibited a pronounced anti-apoptotic effect on C2C12 cells. Zein peptides are abundant in branch-chain amino acids, especially leucine. Transcriptomics analysis revealed that zein peptides can promote proliferation, accelerate cell cycle, and improve protein synthesis of muscle cells through mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling pathways. Full article
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