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Novel Combustion Techniques for Clean Energy II

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "B2: Clean Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 August 2024 | Viewed by 5126

Special Issue Editors

Faculty of Energy and Fuels, AGH University of Science and Technology, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow, Poland
Interests: combustion; adsorption chillers; desalination; cooling production; CFB boilers; oxy-fuel combustion; CLC; biomass; modeling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Faculty of Science and Technology, Jan Dlugosz University in Czestochowa, Armii Krajowej 13/15, 42-200 Czestochowa, Poland
Interests: modeling; adsorption chillers; CFB boilers; oxy-fuel combustion; CLC; CaL; biomass; machine learning; artificial neural networks; fuzzy logic; genetic algorithms
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The increase in energy demand, higher levels of atmospheric pollutants, and global warming are among the most significant human challenges we are facing today. Since the world community currently depends mainly on nonrenewable fossil fuels which are unfriendly to the environment, the development of novel techniques for clean combustion is urgent.

Growing efficiency requirements and limitation of pollutant emissions are factors that lead to the emergence of advanced energy technologies. Some of them are oxyfuel combustion, chemical-looping combustion (CLC), and moderate or intense low-oxygen dilution (MILD) flameless combustion.

This Special Issue aims to bring together research on advances in design, modeling, and performance of novel combustion techniques for clean energy. Original research articles, as well as review articles, are welcomed.

Prof. Dr. Wojciech Nowak
Prof. Dr. Jaroslaw Krzywanski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • combustion
  • energy policy
  • efficiency
  • emissions
  • pollutants
  • modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 5005 KiB  
Article
Two- and Three-Stage Natural Gas Combustion System—Experimental Comparative Analysis
by Ireneusz Pielecha and Filip Szwajca
Energies 2023, 16(9), 3837; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16093837 - 29 Apr 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 739
Abstract
The use of fuels with tendencies to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, particularly gaseous fuels, and improve combustion systems is one of the directions for increasing an internal combustion engine’s attractiveness as a power source. This article presents the effects of combining natural gas [...] Read more.
The use of fuels with tendencies to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, particularly gaseous fuels, and improve combustion systems is one of the directions for increasing an internal combustion engine’s attractiveness as a power source. This article presents the effects of combining natural gas combustion with a multi-stage combustion system. A two- and three-stage lean charge combustion system was proposed in order to increase the energy system efficiency. In order to achieve this, a single-cylinder test engine was used, with two interchangeably implemented combustion systems. The tests were carried out with two values of the excess air coefficient (λ = 1.3 and λ = 1.5), as well as two different fuel dose values (qo = 0.35 and 0.55 mg/inj), injected into the prechamber at the same indicated mean effective pressure value (IMEP = 6.5 bar) and the same engine speed (n = 1500 rpm). Based on the obtained research results, it was found that the use of a three-stage system limited the maximum combustion pressure and heat release rate due to the increased resistance of flows between the chambers. At the same time, it was found that the increase in the engine’s indicated efficiency took place in a two-stage system, regardless of the excess air coefficient. Changing the dose of fuel fed into the prechamber significantly affects the engine performance (and efficiency) but only in the two-stage combustion system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Combustion Techniques for Clean Energy II)
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21 pages, 5206 KiB  
Article
Modelling the Impacts of Hydrogen–Methane Blend Fuels on a Stationary Power Generation Engine
by Kimia Haghighi and Gordon P. McTaggart-Cowan
Energies 2023, 16(5), 2420; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16052420 - 03 Mar 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1933
Abstract
To reduce greenhouse gas emissions from natural gas use, utilities are investigating the potential of adding hydrogen to their distribution grids. This will reduce the carbon dioxide emissions from grid-connected engines used for stationary power generation, and it may also impact their power [...] Read more.
To reduce greenhouse gas emissions from natural gas use, utilities are investigating the potential of adding hydrogen to their distribution grids. This will reduce the carbon dioxide emissions from grid-connected engines used for stationary power generation, and it may also impact their power output and efficiency. Promisingly, hydrogen and natural gas mixtures have shown encouraging results regarding engine power output, pollutant emissions, and thermal efficiency in well-controlled on-road vehicle applications. This work investigates the effects of adding hydrogen to the natural gas fuel for a lean-burn spark-ignited four-stroke, 8.9 liter eight-cylinder naturally aspirated engine used in a commercial stationary power generation application via an engine model developed in the GT-SUITETM modelling environment. The model was validated for fuel consumption, air flow, and exhaust temperature at two operating modes. The focus of the work was to assess the sensitivity of the engine’s power output, brake thermal efficiency, and pollutant emissions to blends of methane with 0–30% (by volume) hydrogen. Without adjusting for the change in fuel energy, the engine power output dropped by approximately 23% when methane was mixed with 30% by volume hydrogen. It was found that increasing the fueling rate to maintain a constant equivalence ratio prevented this drop in power and reduced carbon dioxide emissions by almost 4.5%. In addition, optimizing the spark timing could partially offset the increases in in-cylinder burned and unburned gas temperatures and in-cylinder pressures that resulted from the faster combustion rates when hydrogen was added to the natural gas. Understanding the effect of fuel change in existing systems can provide insight on utilizing hydrogen and natural gas mixtures as the primary fuel without the need for major changes in the engine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Combustion Techniques for Clean Energy II)
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15 pages, 3254 KiB  
Article
Enviro-Economic Assessment of HHO–CNG Mixture Utilization in Spark Ignition Engine for Performance and Environmental Sustainability
by Muhammad Usman, Muhammad Ali Ijaz Malik, Rehmat Bashir, Fahid Riaz, Muhammad Juniad Raza, Khubaib Suleman, Abd-ul Rehman, Waqar Muhammad Ashraf and Jaroslaw Krzywanski
Energies 2022, 15(21), 8253; https://doi.org/10.3390/en15218253 - 04 Nov 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2057
Abstract
Road transportation has received the attention of researchers due to its higher carbon footprint. Alternative fuels present major advantages in terms of environmental sustainability. For this reason, an enviro-economic analysis of alternative fuels carries great significance. However, scarce attempts have been rendered in [...] Read more.
Road transportation has received the attention of researchers due to its higher carbon footprint. Alternative fuels present major advantages in terms of environmental sustainability. For this reason, an enviro-economic analysis of alternative fuels carries great significance. However, scarce attempts have been rendered in order to ascertain the impact of a hydroxy gas (HHO) and compressed natural gas (CNG) mixture on sustainable environmental development. The current study addresses this issue by employing an HHO–CNG mixture and gasoline in spark ignition (SI) engines for the purposes of performance and environmental pollutants measurement. Then, engine emission data were substituted for Weibull distribution in order to establish suitability for 50 and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The mixture outperformed gasoline in terms of brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and emission contents. On average, hydroxy gas with CNG produced 10.59% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOX) comparative to gasoline. Finally, the enviro-economic analysis also turned out to be in favor of the hydroxy gas mixture owing to a saving of 36.14% in USD/year due to 27.87% lower production of carbon dioxide (CO2) emission. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Combustion Techniques for Clean Energy II)
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