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Advanced Energy Conversion and Management Approaches

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "F5: Artificial Intelligence and Smart Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 April 2024) | Viewed by 3675

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Measurement and Sensor Technology in Production Engineering, Leuphana University Lüneburg, 21335 Lüneburg, Germany
Interests: energy-aware wireless sensors; wireless charging; energy harvesting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the rise of mobile devices with power levels ranging from kilowatts (in the case of self-driving cars) to nanowatts (in the case of wireless sensor nodes), novel technologies and system designs are required to realize autonomous and efficient energy supplies. Nowadays, energy conversion techniques using energy harvesting (kinetic, solar and wind sources) and energy transfers (radiofrequency, capacitive power transfer and inductive power transfer) are the focus of research. Consequently, several of their aspects need to be investigated, including higher efficiency, system compactness and cost-effectiveness. This Special Issue on Advanced Energy Conversion and Management Approaches addresses techniques and approaches for the design of autonomous energy systems supplied by energy harvesting and energy transfers. This Special Issue provides a forum for publishing interdisciplinary and original research articles on all modern energy supply topics, including research related to theory, methods and applications, with a focus on energy generation, conversion and transmission, management, storage and conservation. This Special Issue welcomes contributions that support and advance the UN’s sustainable development goals regarding affordable and clean energy (SDG 7).

This Special Issue aims to report the latest progress in power conversion techniques, including energy harvesting and wireless charging. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Analytical and FEM optimization procedures of energy harvesting converters, wireless charging coils, capacitive plates, and radio-frequency antennas;
  • Energy conversion and energy management circuits: AC/DC converters, DC/DC converters and DC/AC inverters;
  • Control approaches for energy harvesting and inductive and capacitive power transfer techniques enhancing power generation, system efficiency and working bandwidth;
  • Hybrid energy sources and energy transfer solutions;
  • Simultaneous wireless information and energy transfer;
  • AI-based solutions for energy conversion and energy transfer system design;
  • Resonance-based methods for energy harvesting and wireless transfer: Synchronized Switch Harvesting on Inductor (SSHI), resonance topologies;
  • New applications of wireless power and energy harvesting technologies: electric vehicles, electric bikes, robots, drones, medical devices, wireless sensors, etc.

Prof. Dr. Ghada Bouattour
Prof. Dr. Olfa Kanoun
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy harvesting
  • wireless power transfer
  • energy management circuits
  • system efficiency and compactness
  • power converters: AC/DC converters, DC/DC converters and DC/AC inverters
  • renewable energy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

27 pages, 8834 KiB  
Article
Optimal Placement of μPMUs in Distribution Networks with Adaptive Topology Changes
by Khaoula Hassini, Ahmed Fakhfakh and Faouzi Derbel
Energies 2023, 16(20), 7047; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16207047 - 11 Oct 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1015
Abstract
With the increasing integration of energy sources and the growing complexity of distribution networks, it is crucial to monitor and early detection of topological changes to ensure grid stability and resilience. Current methods, for optimizing the placement of micro Phasor Measurement Units ( [...] Read more.
With the increasing integration of energy sources and the growing complexity of distribution networks, it is crucial to monitor and early detection of topological changes to ensure grid stability and resilience. Current methods, for optimizing the placement of micro Phasor Measurement Units (μPMUs) focus on achieving observability and efficient monitoring. These algorithms aim to minimize the number of μPMUs needed while maintaining system observability or meeting criteria for observability. However, they may not consider all real-world constraints and uncertainties. In this study, we introduce a strategy for placing μPMUs with the objective of enhancing observability and monitoring capabilities. Our proposed algorithm employs a technique that makes optimal decisions at each step to approximate the global optimum. To determine the locations for μPMUs our algorithm takes into account parameters such as network structure, key nodes, and system stability. One distinguishing feature is its adaptability to distribution networks, including changes, in topology or potential device failures. Unlike classical approaches, our algorithm can continuously provide optimal placement solutions even in evolving network conditions. We have demonstrated that our suggested method achieves better results in terms of observability value and the required number of μPMUs compared to the state-of-the-art. By strategically placing μPMUs, operators can improve system observability, quickly detect and locate faults, and make informed decisions for effective network operations. This research helps improve optimal placement strategies for μPMUs by providing practical and effective solutions to improve distribution network reliability, resilience, and performance in the face of changing dynamics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Energy Conversion and Management Approaches)
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17 pages, 1032 KiB  
Article
Model-Based Optimization of Spiral Coils for Improving Wireless Power Transfer
by Yosra Ben Fadhel, Ghada Bouattour, Dhouha Bouchaala, Nabil Derbel and Olfa Kanoun
Energies 2023, 16(19), 6886; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16196886 - 29 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1082
Abstract
Inductive wireless power transfer is a promising technology for powering smart wearable devices. The spiral coil shape is widely used in wireless power transfer applications. Nevertheless, during the coil design process, there are many challenges to overcome considering all the design constraints. The [...] Read more.
Inductive wireless power transfer is a promising technology for powering smart wearable devices. The spiral coil shape is widely used in wireless power transfer applications. Nevertheless, during the coil design process, there are many challenges to overcome considering all the design constraints. The most important is to determine the optimal coil parameters (internal radius, external radius, spacing, wire width, and conductive wire) with the aim of obtaining the highest coil quality factor. Coil modeling is very important for the wireless power transfer system’s efficiency. Indeed, it is challenging because it requires a high computational effort and has convergence problems. In this paper, we propose a new approach for the approximation of spiral coils through concentric circular turns to reduce the computational effort. The mathematical model determines the optimal coil parameters to obtain the highest coil quality factor. We have chosen the smart textile as an application. The system operates at a frequency of 100 Khz considering the Qi guidelines. To validate this approach, we compared the approximated circular coil model with the spiral coil model through a finite element method simulation using the COMSOL software. The obtained results show that the proposed approximation reduces the complexity of the coil design process and performs well compared to the model corresponding to the spiral shape, without significantly modifying the coil inductance. For a wire width smaller than 1 mm, the total deviation is around 4% in terms of the coil quality factor in a predetermined domain of its parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Energy Conversion and Management Approaches)
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39 pages, 48915 KiB  
Article
Energizing Emergency Exit Signs with Wireless Energy Transfer
by Mohamed Z. Chaari, Gilroy P. Pereira, Mohamed Abdelfatah, Rashid Al-Rahimi and Otman Aghzout
Energies 2023, 16(13), 5080; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16135080 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1129
Abstract
Emergency exit lights in public buildings are necessary for safety and evacuation. International safety standards require such lighting in many public places, like airports, schools, malls, hospitals, and other spaces, to prevent human casualties in emergencies. Emergency exit lights have become an essential [...] Read more.
Emergency exit lights in public buildings are necessary for safety and evacuation. International safety standards require such lighting in many public places, like airports, schools, malls, hospitals, and other spaces, to prevent human casualties in emergencies. Emergency exit lights have become an essential part of casualty reduction projects. They can pose several application problems, including fire safety concerns. The issue of providing a safe way and operating emergency exit lights along one side of a long path arises during an emergency. Many studies in this field consider the case in which emergency exit lights’ battery or main power fails. Power failures in dangerous situations such as fires or terrorist attacks make it difficult for people to escape. The lighting in open areas and stairwells during an emergency should be at least 2 lux. This work proposes an innovative technique for wirelessly powering emergency lights using microwave energy. Specifically, the study designed and fabricated a new wirelessly powered emergency lighting prototype. This prototype’s wireless power transfer (WPT) base comprises an RF/DC converter circuit and an RF microwave transmitter station. The device can harvest RF microwave energy to energize the emergency light. This research aimed to develop a compact device that captures maximum RF strength to power emergency lights. As a prototype, the proposed device was designed to provide sufficient microwave energy to power an emergency light at 3 W over a 62 m distance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Energy Conversion and Management Approaches)
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