Last Advances in Nanophotonic Biosensors: Bioengineering and Theranostics Applications

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Nano- and Micro-Technologies in Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 9951

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Biophotonic Nanosensors Laboratory, Center for Applied Physics and Advanced Technology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM), Juriquilla, Queretaro, Mexico
Interests: biophotonics; optically active nanomaterials; graphene and 2D materials; wearable devices; point of care devices; biosensors; nanocomposites; microarray technology; in vitro diagnostics
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Guest Editor
Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: nanoplasmonics; optical sensor; nanomaterials for sensing; lab-on-a-chip; organ-on-chip; biosensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The biosensors market is expected to reach 31.5 billion USD by 2024. Although point-of-care still represents the main segment in the overall biosensor market (about 57%) there is a remarkable increase in the use of biosensors for nonmedical applications, for example, in the development of smart cell-culture systems and environmental protection. With the recent burst in live cell analysis, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine with organoids that mimic the activity and physiological response of entire organs, there is an increasing need for biosensors that can monitor cell activity and segregate biomarkers related to physical and biochemical stimulus and organ crosstalk. Among different biosensing technologies suitable for bioengineering and theranostics, those based on photonic phenomena at the nanoscale have been the focus of extensive research and development over the last years due to their improved surface sensitivity and multiplexed and real-time detection capabilities. This Special Issue focuses on the advancement and development of nanophotonic technologies contributing to biosensing platforms for biomedical and theranostic approaches, as well as environmental monitoring, including but not limited to live cell analysis, organ-on-chip, and point-of-care devices.

Dr. Gerardo Arturo López Muñoz
Prof. Dr. Eden Morales-Narváez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanostructured optical materials
  • Optical metamaterials
  • Nanoplasmonic biosensors
  • Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy biosensors
  • Nano-interferometer-based and nano-resonator-based biosensors
  • Photonic and plasmonic nanocrystals
  • Multiplexed/multi-analyte detection
  • Organoids
  • Tissue Engineering
  • Point-of-care
  • Lab-on-a-chip
  • Organ-on-chip
  • Environmental protection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 2257 KiB  
Article
In Situ LSPR Sensing of Secreted Insulin in Organ-on-Chip
by María A. Ortega, Júlia Rodríguez-Comas, Ozlem Yavas, Ferran Velasco-Mallorquí, Jordina Balaguer-Trias, Victor Parra, Anna Novials, Joan M. Servitja, Romain Quidant and Javier Ramón-Azcón
Biosensors 2021, 11(5), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios11050138 - 28 Apr 2021
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 5283
Abstract
Organ-on-a-chip (OOC) devices offer new approaches for metabolic disease modeling and drug discovery by providing biologically relevant models of tissues and organs in vitro with a high degree of control over experimental variables for high-content screening applications. Yet, to fully exploit the potential [...] Read more.
Organ-on-a-chip (OOC) devices offer new approaches for metabolic disease modeling and drug discovery by providing biologically relevant models of tissues and organs in vitro with a high degree of control over experimental variables for high-content screening applications. Yet, to fully exploit the potential of these platforms, there is a need to interface them with integrated non-labeled sensing modules, capable of monitoring, in situ, their biochemical response to external stimuli, such as stress or drugs. In order to meet this need, we aim here to develop an integrated technology based on coupling a localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing module to an OOC device to monitor the insulin in situ secretion in pancreatic islets, a key physiological event that is usually perturbed in metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). As a proof of concept, we developed a biomimetic islet-on-a-chip (IOC) device composed of mouse pancreatic islets hosted in a cellulose-based scaffold as a novel approach. The IOC was interfaced with a state-of-the-art on-chip LSPR sensing platform to monitor the in situ insulin secretion. The developed platform offers a powerful tool to enable the in situ response study of microtissues to external stimuli for applications such as a drug-screening platform for human models, bypassing animal testing. Full article
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Review

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57 pages, 7339 KiB  
Review
Biomolecule-Based Optical Metamaterials: Design and Applications
by Ana Laura Torres-Huerta, Aurora Antonio-Pérez, Yolanda García-Huante, Nayelhi Julieta Alcázar-Ramírez and Juan Carlos Rueda-Silva
Biosensors 2022, 12(11), 962; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12110962 - 02 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3777
Abstract
Metamaterials are broadly defined as artificial, electromagnetically homogeneous structures that exhibit unusual physical properties that are not present in nature. They possess extraordinary capabilities to bend electromagnetic waves. Their size, shape and composition can be engineered to modify their characteristics, such as iridescence, [...] Read more.
Metamaterials are broadly defined as artificial, electromagnetically homogeneous structures that exhibit unusual physical properties that are not present in nature. They possess extraordinary capabilities to bend electromagnetic waves. Their size, shape and composition can be engineered to modify their characteristics, such as iridescence, color shift, absorbance at different wavelengths, etc., and harness them as biosensors. Metamaterial construction from biological sources such as carbohydrates, proteins and nucleic acids represents a low-cost alternative, rendering high quantities and yields. In addition, the malleability of these biomaterials makes it possible to fabricate an endless number of structured materials such as composited nanoparticles, biofilms, nanofibers, quantum dots, and many others, with very specific, invaluable and tremendously useful optical characteristics. The intrinsic characteristics observed in biomaterials make them suitable for biomedical applications. This review addresses the optical characteristics of metamaterials obtained from the major macromolecules found in nature: carbohydrates, proteins and DNA, highlighting their biosensor field use, and pointing out their physical properties and production paths. Full article
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