Low-Dimensional Materials (LDMs) for Biosensing Applications

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 2576

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
Interests: 2D materials; 1D nanotubes and nanofibers; heterostructures of 1D and 2D nanomaterials; polymer nanocomposites; energy storage and conversion; electronics; biosensors
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Guest Editor
Biophotonic Nanosensors Laboratory, Center for Applied Physics and Advanced Technology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM), Juriquilla, Queretaro, Mexico
Interests: biophotonics; optically active nanomaterials; graphene and 2D materials; wearable devices; point of care devices; biosensors; nanocomposites; microarray technology; in vitro diagnostics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Low-dimensional materials (LDMs) are emerging materials in the development of next-generation biosensors with superior performance. LDMs, including zero-dimensional (0D) nanoparticles, one-dimensional (1D) nanowires/nanotubes, and two-dimensional (2D) nanosheets (e.g., 2D graphene, MoS2, and MXenes), have been widely employed as sensing components, as either sensing materials or transducers. This is due to their high surface-to-volume ratios and unique physical and chemical properties. In view of this rapidly growing field, it is our pleasure to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue focused on the recent advances, future perspectives, and challenges for the development of biosensors using LDMs.

The present Special Issue is devoted to all aspects of biosensors utilizing LDMs, including, but not limited to, the novel synthesis routes of LDMs for biosensing, the fabrication approaches of LDM-based devices, and the applications of nano-biosensors. For example, 0D Au nanoparticles and 2D MoS2 nanosheets have been used for the development of electrochemical and optical biosensors. One-dimensional Si nanowires, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and two-dimensional graphene-based field-effect transistors have been developed as biosensors, among other types of sensors. To date, a variety of transduction methods can be applied, including electrochemical, optical, and hybrid methods. A broad range of applications are of interest to this Special Issue, including proof-of-concept, point-of-care, flexible, implantable, and wearable devices.

This Special Issue, devoted to LDMs for biosensing, aims to focus on the most recent advances in the development of a variety of LDMs, devices, and application systems for biosensing and will be composed of research articles, communications, reviews, and perspective studies. We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Dr. Meng-Qiang Zhao
Prof. Dr. Eden Morales-Narváez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • low-dimensional materials (LDMs)
  • biosensors
  • biosensing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 2267 KiB  
Article
Strain-Modulated and Nanorod-Waveguided Fluorescence in Single Zinc Oxide Nanorod-Based Immunodetection
by Marion Ryan C. Sytu, Andrew Stoner and Jong-In Hahm
Biosensors 2024, 14(2), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios14020085 - 03 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1196
Abstract
Mechanical strain has been shown to be a versatile and tunable means to control various properties of nanomaterials. In this work, we investigate how strain applied to individual ZnO nanorods (NRs) can affect the fluorescence signals originated from external sources of bioanalytes, which [...] Read more.
Mechanical strain has been shown to be a versatile and tunable means to control various properties of nanomaterials. In this work, we investigate how strain applied to individual ZnO nanorods (NRs) can affect the fluorescence signals originated from external sources of bioanalytes, which are subsequently coupled and guided onto the NRs. Specifically, we determine how factors such as the NR length and protein concentration can influence the strain-induced changes in the waveguided fluorescence intensity along the NRs. We employ a protein of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and a fluorophore-labeled antibody in a model immunoassay reaction, after which Alexa488-TNF-α immunocomplex is formed on ZnO NRs. We elucidate the relationships between the types as well as amounts of strain on the NRs and the fluorescence intensity originated from the Alexa488-TNF-α immunocomplexes. We show that tensile (compressive) strain applied to the NR leads to an increase (decrease) in the waveguided fluorescence signals. By assessing important optical phenomena such as fluorescence intensification on nanorod ends (FINE) and degree of FINE (DoF), we confirm their linear dependence with both the types and amounts of strain. Furthermore, the strain-induced changes in both FINE and DoF are found to be independent of protein concentration. We determine that NR length plays a critical role in obtaining high strain-dependence of the measured fluorescence signals. Particularly, we ascertain that longer NRs yield larger changes in both FINE and DoF in response to the applied strain, relative to shorter ones. In addition, longer NRs permit higher linear correlation between the protein concentration and the waveguided fluorescence intensity. These outcomes provide valuable insight into exploiting strain to enhance the detection of optical signals from bioanalytes, thus enabling their quantifications even at ultra-trace levels. Coupled with the use of individual ZnO NRs demonstrated in our measurements, this work may contribute to the development of a miniaturized, highly sensitive biosensor whose signal transduction is best optimized by the application of strain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Dimensional Materials (LDMs) for Biosensing Applications)
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15 pages, 3827 KiB  
Article
Ti3C2Tx MXene-Based Fluorescent Aptasensor for Detection of Dimethoate Pesticide
by Zhichao Li, Hongbin Pu and Qingyi Wei
Biosensors 2024, 14(2), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios14020069 - 29 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1115
Abstract
Dimethoate contaminants in food pose a threat to human health. Rapid and sensitive trace detection methods are required to keep food safe. In this study, a novel fluorescent aptasensor was developed for the sensitive detection of dimethoate based on carbon quantum dots labeled [...] Read more.
Dimethoate contaminants in food pose a threat to human health. Rapid and sensitive trace detection methods are required to keep food safe. In this study, a novel fluorescent aptasensor was developed for the sensitive detection of dimethoate based on carbon quantum dots labeled with double-stranded DNA (CQDs−apt−cDNA) and Ti3C2Tx flakes. Under optimal conditions, the aptasensor showed a good linear range of 1 × 10−9 to 5 × 10−5 M for dimethoate with a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.996. Besides, a low detection limit of 2.18 × 10−10 M was obtained. The aptasensor showed high selectivity in interference samples and good reproducibility with an RSD of 3.06% (<5%) for dimethoate detection. Furthermore, the proposed aptasensor was applied to the detection of dimethoate in apple juice and tap water with satisfactory recoveries from 96.2 to 104.4%. Because of these benefits, this aptasensor has the potential and promise for detecting food contaminants in the food industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Dimensional Materials (LDMs) for Biosensing Applications)
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