Nanomaterials and Nanostructure Devices for Biosensing

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensor Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 7206

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Interests: aptamer; transistor; implantable device; wearable device; flexible electronics; neuroscience

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA
Interests: 2D materials; 1D nanotubes and nanofibers; heterostructures of 1D and 2D nanomaterials; polymer nanocomposites; energy storage and conversion; electronics; biosensors
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials and nanostructure-based devices are highly promising in the development of next-generation biosensors with superior performance. Nanomaterials, including one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials (e.g., 1D Si nanowires (Si NWs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), 2D graphene, MoS2, and MXenes) have been employed as sensing components, due to their ultrahigh surface-to-volume ratios. Nanostructure-based devices, on the other hand, can provide similar surface-to-volume ratios as nanomaterial-based devices by nano- and micro-fabrication processes, such as nanolithography. Unique physical and chemical properties have been demonstrated from nanomaterials and nanostructure-based device systems. In view of this rapidly growing field, it is our pleasure to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue focused on the recent advances, future perspectives, and challenges for the development of biosensors using nanomaterials and nanostructures.

The present Special Issue is devoted to all aspects of biosensors utilizing nanomaterials and nanostructures, including, but not limited to, the novel synthesis routes of nanomaterials for biosensing, the fabrication approaches for nanostructures for biosensing, and the applications of nano-biosensors. For example, SiNWs, CNTs, and graphene-based field-effect transistor biosensors have been developed as chemical, gas, and biological sensors. A variety of sensing mechanisms can be applied, including electrochemical, optical, and fluorescent sensing. A broad range of applications are of interest to this Special Issue, including point-of-care, flexible, implantable, and wearable devices.

This Special Issue, devoted to nanomaterials and nanostructures for biosensing, aims to focus on the most recent advances in the development of a variety of material, device, and application systems for biosensing, and will be composed of research articles, communications, reviews, and perspective studies. We look forward to your submission.

Dr. Chuanzhen Zhao
Prof. Dr. Mengqiang Zhao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanostructures
  • biosensors
  • one-dimensional materials
  • two-dimensional materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 5282 KiB  
Article
A Modified Electrochemical Sensor Based on N,S-Doped Carbon Dots/Carbon Nanotube-Poly(Amidoamine) Dendrimer Hybrids for Imatinib Mesylate Determination
by Maryam Saleh Mohammadnia, Hossein Roghani-Mamaqani, Masoumeh Ghalkhani and Salar Hemmati
Biosensors 2023, 13(5), 547; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13050547 - 15 May 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1503
Abstract
Imatinib mesylate, an anticancer drug, is prescribed to treat gastrointestinal stromal tumors and chronic myelogenous leukemia. A hybrid nanocomposite of N,S-doped carbon dots/carbon nanotube-poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (N,S-CDs/CNTD) was successfully synthesized and used as a significant modifier to design a new and highly selective electrochemical [...] Read more.
Imatinib mesylate, an anticancer drug, is prescribed to treat gastrointestinal stromal tumors and chronic myelogenous leukemia. A hybrid nanocomposite of N,S-doped carbon dots/carbon nanotube-poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (N,S-CDs/CNTD) was successfully synthesized and used as a significant modifier to design a new and highly selective electrochemical sensor for the determination of imatinib mesylate. A rigorous study with electrochemical techniques, such as cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry, was performed to elucidate the electrocatalytic properties of the as-prepared nanocomposite and the preparation procedure of the modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). A higher oxidation peak current was generated for the imatinib mesylate on a N,S-CDs/CNTD/GCE surface compared to the GCE and CNTD/GCE. The N,S-CDs/CNTD/GCE showed a linear relationship between the concentration and oxidation peak current of the imatinib mesylate in 0.01–100 μM, with a detection limit of 3 nM. Finally, the imatinib mesylate’s quantification in blood-serum samples was successfully performed. The N,S-CDs/CNTD/GCE’s reproducibility and stability were indeed excellent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Nanostructure Devices for Biosensing)
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10 pages, 909 KiB  
Communication
Two-Dimensional Ti3C2 MXene-Based Novel Nanocomposites for Breath Sensors for Early Detection of Diabetes Mellitus
by Anna Rudie, Anna Marie Schornack, Qiang Wu, Qifeng Zhang and Danling Wang
Biosensors 2022, 12(5), 332; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12050332 - 13 May 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2663
Abstract
The rates of diabetes throughout the world are rising rapidly, impacting nearly every country. New research is focused on better ways to monitor and treat this disease. Breath acetone levels have been defined as a biomarker for diabetes. The development of a method [...] Read more.
The rates of diabetes throughout the world are rising rapidly, impacting nearly every country. New research is focused on better ways to monitor and treat this disease. Breath acetone levels have been defined as a biomarker for diabetes. The development of a method to monitor and diagnose diabetes utilizing breath acetone levels would provide a fast, easy, and non-invasive treatment option. An ideal material for point-of-care diabetes management would need to have a high response to acetone, high acetone selectivity, low interference from humidity, and be able to operate at room temperature. Chemiresistive gas sensors are a promising method for sensing breath acetone due to their simple fabrication and easy operation. Certain semiconductor materials in chemiresistive sensors can react to acetone in the air and produce changes in resistance that can be correlated with acetone levels. While these materials have been developed and show strong responses to acetone with good selectivity, most of them must operate at high temperatures (compared to RT), causing high power consumption, unstable device operation, and complex device design. In this paper, we systematically studied a series of 2-dimensional MXene-based nanocomposites as the sensing materials in chemiresistive sensors to detect 2.86 ppm of acetone at room temperature. Most of them showed great sensitivity and selectivity for acetone. In particular, the 1D/2D CrWO/Ti3C2 nanocomposite showed the best sensing response to acetone: nine times higher sensitivity than 1D KWO nanowires. To determine the sensing selectivity, a CrWO/Ti3C2 nanocomposite-based sensor was exposed to various common vapors in human breath. The result revealed that it has excellent selectivity for acetone, and far lower responses to other vapors. All these preliminary results indicate that this material is a promising candidate for the creation of a point-of-care diabetes management device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Nanostructure Devices for Biosensing)
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Review

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19 pages, 5211 KiB  
Review
Plasmonic Nanopillars—A Brief Investigation of Fabrication Techniques and Biological Applications
by Heesang Ahn, Soojung Kim, Sung Suk Oh, Mihee Park, Seungchul Kim, Jong-ryul Choi and Kyujung Kim
Biosensors 2023, 13(5), 534; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios13050534 - 10 May 2023
Viewed by 2190
Abstract
Nanopillars (NPs) are submicron-sized pillars composed of dielectrics, semiconductors, or metals. They have been employed to develop advanced optical components such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and biophotonic devices. To integrate localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) with NPs, plasmonic NPs consisting of dielectric [...] Read more.
Nanopillars (NPs) are submicron-sized pillars composed of dielectrics, semiconductors, or metals. They have been employed to develop advanced optical components such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and biophotonic devices. To integrate localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) with NPs, plasmonic NPs consisting of dielectric nanoscale pillars with metal capping have been developed and used for plasmonic optical sensing and imaging applications. In this study, we studied plasmonic NPs in terms of their fabrication techniques and applications in biophotonics. We briefly described three methods for fabricating NPs, namely etching, nanoimprinting, and growing NPs on a substrate. Furthermore, we explored the role of metal capping in plasmonic enhancement. Then, we presented the biophotonic applications of high-sensitivity LSPR sensors, enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and high-resolution plasmonic optical imaging. After exploring plasmonic NPs, we determined that they had sufficient potential for advanced biophotonic instruments and biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials and Nanostructure Devices for Biosensing)
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