10th Anniversary of Biomedicines—Intestinal Homeostasis and the Crosstalk within the Gut-Liver Axis

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Immunology and Immunotherapy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 4984

Special Issue Editors

Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies in Food (IMDEA Food), Madrid, Spain
Interests: immunonutrition; macrophages; trained immunity; gut-liver axis; microbiota
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Laboratory of Food and Helath, Research Group on Quality, Safety and Bioactivity of Plant Foods, Department Food Science and Technology, CEBAS-CSIC, P.O. Box 164, Campus de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Interests: polyphenols; in vitro; in vivo; pharmacology; eicosanoids; inflammation; cardiovascular; health; bioactive molecules
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The study of immune signals that stem at the intestinal level is an emerging field in immunology contributing to a better understanding of innate immune biology and the underlying events triggering immunometabolic effects within the gut-liver axis. While a complex cellular network of resident cells and dietary and metabolic products is well known, the fact that intestinal innate immune signals and immunonutritional effectors constitute critical determinants of the immune processes taking place at the liver level has become evident. In the context of biomedicine, intestinal homeostasis and the crosstalk within the gut-liver axis represent a path forward to selectively develop and maintain a long-lasting immune response(s). Intestinal immune interventions have been shown to be effective in hepatic metabolism regulation and immunity targeting tissue resident innate lymphoid cells and peripheral monocytes. Thus, harnessing intestinal immunometabolic homeostasis may benefit liver health and the control of related diseases. However, fundamental questions remain about immune and metabolic events that overall require a concerted effort to overcome the usually fragmented and compartmentalized approach to address the gut-liver axis. Identification and development of those, and the definition of their biomedical translation based on life sciences, can greatly accelerate our progress toward precision medicine in health promotion.

Dr. Juan Antonio Giménez-Bastida
Dr. Jose Laparra Llopis
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • gut-liver axis
  • macrophages
  • trained immunity
  • gut-liver axis
  • microbiota
  • innate immunity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 6011 KiB  
Article
Characterization of Maladaptive Processes in Acute, Chronic and Remission Phases of Experimental Colitis in C57BL/6 Mice
Biomedicines 2022, 10(8), 1903; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10081903 - 05 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2399
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis is a widely used mouse model in IBD research. DSS colitis involves activation of the submucosal immune system and can be used to study [...] Read more.
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) induced colitis is a widely used mouse model in IBD research. DSS colitis involves activation of the submucosal immune system and can be used to study IBD-like disease characteristics in acute, chronic, remission and transition phases. Insight into colon inflammatory parameters is needed to understand potentially irreversible adaptations to the chronification of colitis, determining the baseline and impact of further inflammatory episodes. We performed analyses of non-invasive and invasive colitis parameters in acute, chronic and remission phases of the DSS colitis in C57BL/6 mice. Non-invasive colitis parameters poorly reflected inflammatory aspects of colitis in chronic remission phase. We found invasive inflammatory parameters, positively linked to repeated DSS-episodes, such as specific colon weight, inflamed colon area, spleen weight, absolute cell numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as B cells, blood IFN-γ level, colonic chemokines BLC and MDC as well as the prevalence of Turicibacter species in feces. Moreover, microbial Lactobacillus species decreased with chronification of disease. Our data point out indicative parameters of recurrent gut inflammation in context of DSS colitis. Full article
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13 pages, 1737 KiB  
Article
Effects of Resveratrol Administration in Liver Injury Prevention as Induced by an Obesogenic Diet: Role of Ruminococcaceae
Biomedicines 2022, 10(8), 1797; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines10081797 - 26 Jul 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2090
Abstract
Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been described in several metabolic disruptions, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Administration of resveratrol has been claimed to elicit benefits against NAFLD along with modulating gut microbiota composition. This investigation aims to study the putative mediating role [...] Read more.
Gut microbiota dysbiosis has been described in several metabolic disruptions, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Administration of resveratrol has been claimed to elicit benefits against NAFLD along with modulating gut microbiota composition. This investigation aims to study the putative mediating role of gut microbiota in the potential hepato-protective effects of resveratrol in a diet-induced NAFLD rat model. The involvement of bacteria from the Ruminococcaceae family in such effects was also addressed. Resveratrol administration resulted in lowered liver weight and serum total and non-HDL cholesterol concentrations, as well as in increased serum HDL cholesterol levels. The administration of this polyphenol also prevented obesogenic diet-induced serum transaminase increases. In addition, histopathological analysis revealed that resveratrol administration ameliorated the dietary-induced liver steatosis and hepatic inflammation. Gut microbiota sequencing showed an inverse relationship between some bacteria from the Ruminococcaceae family and the screened hepatic markers, whereas in other cases the opposite relationship was also found. Interestingly, an interaction was found between UBA-1819 abundance and resveratrol induced liver weight decrease, suggesting that for this marker resveratrol induced effects were greater when the abundance of this bacteria was high, while no actions were found when UBA-1819 abundance was low. Full article
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