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Dietary Bioactive Compounds and Breast Cancer

A special issue of Current Issues in Molecular Biology (ISSN 1467-3045). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 4645

Special Issue Editors

Laboratory of Food and Health, Food and Technology Department, National Council for Scientific Research (CEBAS-CSIC), Murcia, Spain
Interests: food and health; bioactive compounds; polyphenols; cell culture and animal models; clinical trials; cardiovascular; cancer; inflammation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Laboratory of Food and Helath, Research Group on Quality, Safety and Bioactivity of Plant Foods, Department Food Science and Technology, CEBAS-CSIC, P.O. Box 164, Campus de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Interests: polyphenols; in vitro; in vivo; pharmacology; eicosanoids; inflammation; cardiovascular; health; bioactive molecules
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Breast cancer is the most common occurring cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Over 80% of cases are non-hereditary, and therefore, modifiable extrinsic factors related to lifestyle, including dietary habits, play a key role in its prevention. Plant foodstuff is the most important source of bioactive compounds, including polyphenols, carotenoids, phytosterols, and others, that have been reported to exert anticancer effects by playing a broad range of pleiotropic multi-targeted activities on breast cancer cells and animal models. Although many epidemiological and observational studies have inversely correlated fruit and vegetable consumption with breast cancer incidence, the involvement of their phytochemicals remains contradictory. Over the past few decades, wrong approaches without considering their bioavailability and metabolism have been behind the current gap between preclinical and clinical research.

Therefore, this Special Issue of the Current Issues in Molecular Biology will publish original research and review papers on the chemopreventive and/or chemosensitization effects on breast cancer of dietary bioactive compounds and/or derived metabolites using physiologically relevant preclinical (cell and animal models) and clinical approaches that could elucidate whether they are responsible for the effects attributed to plant-based foods.

Dr. Antonio González-Sarrías
Dr. Juan Antonio Giménez-Bastida
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Issues in Molecular Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • chemoprevention
  • plant foods
  • phytochemicals
  • phytoestrogens
  • polyphenols
  • bioavailability studies
  • clinical trials
  • animal and cellular studies
  • anti-cancer mechanisms

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 1778 KiB  
Communication
(–)-Xanthatin as a Killer of Human Breast Cancer MCF-7 Mammosphere Cells: A Comparative Study with Salinomycin
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2022, 44(9), 3849-3858; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb44090264 - 25 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2073
Abstract
Experimental evidence accumulated by our research group and others strongly suggests that (–)-xanthatin, a xanthanolide sesquiterpene lactone, exhibits anti-proliferative effects on human breast cancer cells (in vitro) as well as anti-tumor effects in experimental animals (in vivo). In cancer biology, it is now [...] Read more.
Experimental evidence accumulated by our research group and others strongly suggests that (–)-xanthatin, a xanthanolide sesquiterpene lactone, exhibits anti-proliferative effects on human breast cancer cells (in vitro) as well as anti-tumor effects in experimental animals (in vivo). In cancer biology, it is now critically important for anti-cancer agents to selectively target cancer stem cells (CSCs) in order to overcome cancer therapeutic resistance and recurrence. However, it has not yet been established whether (–)-xanthatin abrogates the formation of breast CSCs. In the present study, we utilized chemically synthesized pure (–)-xanthatin and a culture system to obtain mammospheres from human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, which are a CSC-enriched population. We herein demonstrated for the first time that (–)-xanthatin exhibited the ability to kill mammospheres, similar to salinomycin, an established selective killer of CSCs. A possible anti-proliferative mechanism toward mammospheres by (–)-xanthatin is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bioactive Compounds and Breast Cancer)
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13 pages, 1940 KiB  
Article
Corema album Leaves Mediate DNA Damage in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells
Curr. Issues Mol. Biol. 2022, 44(8), 3598-3610; https://doi.org/10.3390/cimb44080246 - 11 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1689
Abstract
Corema (C.) album is a shrub endemic to the Atlantic coast and has been described as yielding beneficial effects for human health. Nevertheless, studies concerning the bioactivity of C. album leaves are scarce. This study aims at investigating the anticancer potential and mode [...] Read more.
Corema (C.) album is a shrub endemic to the Atlantic coast and has been described as yielding beneficial effects for human health. Nevertheless, studies concerning the bioactivity of C. album leaves are scarce. This study aims at investigating the anticancer potential and mode of action, of an hydroethanolic extract of C. album leaves (ECAL) on triple-negative breast cancer. This is a poor survival breast cancer subtype, owing to its high risk of distant reappearance, metastasis rates and the probability of relapse. The ECAL ability to prevent tumor progression through (i) the inhibition of cell proliferation (cell viability); (ii) the induction of apoptosis (morphological changes, TUNEL assay, caspase-3 cleaved) and (iii) the induction of DNA damage (PARP1 and γH2AX) with (iv) the involvement of NF-κB and of ERK1/2 pathways (AlphaScreen assay) was evaluated. ECAL activated the apoptotic pathway (through caspase-3) along with the inhibition of ERK and NF-κB pathways causing DNA damage and cell death. The large polyphenolic content of ECAL was presumed to be accountable for these effects. The extract of C. album leaves can target multiple pathways and, thus, can block more than one possible means of disease progression, evidencing the anticancer therapeutic potential from a plant source. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bioactive Compounds and Breast Cancer)
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