New Trends in Training, Performance, Coaching and Health in Sports Science

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 2173

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Communication and Education, Universidad Loyola Andalucía, 41704 Dos Hermanas, Spain
Interests: heat stress; heat acclimation; performance optimization; physiological adaptions; trace elements; health; oxidative stress
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, Camilo José Cela University, C. Castillo de Alarcón, 49, Villafranca del Castillo, 28692 Madrid, Spain
Interests: gut microbiota; hypoxia training; environmental stress; performance; optimization; physiological adaptions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In contemporary sports science, there exists a discernible paradigm shift characterized by emerging trends that significantly influence the domains of training, performance, coaching, and health. Notably, a predominant trend involves the amalgamation of data analytics and technological advancements, wherein wearable sensors and sophisticated tracking systems are deployed to monitor athletes' physiological parameters, biomechanical patterns, and performance metrics in real-time. This integration enables coaches and sports scientists to make empirically informed decisions, thereby optimizing training protocols and performance outcomes.

Furthermore, there is a notable trend towards the individualization of training regimes, whereby customized programs are tailored to accommodate the unique physiological and psychological profiles of athletes. This personalized approach encompasses bespoke nutrition plans, recovery strategies, and workload management techniques, which collectively aim to augment performance while mitigating the risk of injuries.

Moreover, interdisciplinary collaboration among sports scientists, nutritionists, physiotherapists, and coaches is expanding, fostering comprehensive approaches to optimizing athletic performance and nurturing long-term well-being. These evolving trends underscore a commitment to advancing the scientific frontier of sports performance while championing holistic athlete development and health.

Therefore, this Special Issue entitled “New Trends in Training, Performance, Coaching and Health in Sports Science” welcomes the submission of recent research work on this promising application area for human performance.

Dr. Jesús Siquier-Coll
Dr. Ismael Martínez Guardado
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • wearable technology
  • personalized training
  • mental health in sports
  • data analytics and interdisciplinary collaboration

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1213 KiB  
Article
Quarterly Percentual Change in Height, Weight, Body Fat and Muscle Mass in Young Football Players of Different Categories
by Moisés Falces-Prieto, Ricardo Martín-Moya, Gabriel Delgado-García, Rui Miguel Silva, Halil Ibrahim Ceylan and Juan Carlos de la Cruz-Márquez
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(9), 3915; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14093915 - 4 May 2024
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the change of Body Composition (BC) (height, weight, body fat percentage and muscle mass) as a function of the trimester and category in a sample of young soccer players. Data collection was performed in five [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to compare the change of Body Composition (BC) (height, weight, body fat percentage and muscle mass) as a function of the trimester and category in a sample of young soccer players. Data collection was performed in five consecutive seasons (2016–2021). The sample consisted of 741 young male football players of different categories (Under 14 year old (U14), U15, U16, U17 and U18) belonging to a high-performance football academy. Considering the trimestral change of all the raw anthropometrics variables a set of new variables called the trimestral change in percentage (TC) of each raw variable was computed. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA (including the raw anthropometric variables as dependent and trimester and the age-category as independent) revealed differences for the anthropometric variables (p value < 0.001 in all cases), concluding that the effect of trimester reaches conventional levels of statistical significance. The trimester by age in contrast was significant (p < 0.05) in all raw variables except for the height. Considering the TC variables, the variable height-TC showed an increase (p value < 0.05) while the variable muscle mass-TC was near the significative value (p = 0.09). In this case the interaction trimester by age category was not significative (p > 0.05 in all cases). It seems that height suffers more changes in the first trimester but the weight, body fat percentage and muscle mass changes more in the second and third trimester. It is important to modulate the training load according to the trimester-specific response, although these improvements may vary according to factors such as genetics, diet, sleep and the specific training. Full article
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18 pages, 1633 KiB  
Article
Uncovering Success Patterns in Track Cycling: Integrating Performance Data with Coaches and Athletes’ Perspectives
by Leonardo Cesanelli, Thomas Lagoute, Berta Ylaite, Julio Calleja-González, Eneko Fernández-Peña, Danguole Satkunskiene, Nuno Leite and Tomas Venckunas
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(7), 3125; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14073125 - 8 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Track cycling entails a challenging progression from the youth categories to elite competition. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the importance of early performance and various publicly available performance indicators in predicting the success of male and female cyclists across different track disciplines. [...] Read more.
Track cycling entails a challenging progression from the youth categories to elite competition. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the importance of early performance and various publicly available performance indicators in predicting the success of male and female cyclists across different track disciplines. Additionally, the study enriches the findings by incorporating interviews with international-level coaches and athletes. A retrospective analysis of data from UCI track cycling databases was conducted, supplemented by interviews with international-level coaches and athletes. The success rate for highly ranked junior track cyclists was found to be less than 20%, with a majority of these athletes specializing in sprint events, regardless of gender. The study indicated that the UCI ranking and points earned during the season were not reliable indicators for distinguishing future success (p < 0.05). From the interviews, we identified three main themes: (1) trends in career success from the youth to elite categories, (2) performance markers as predictors of future success, and (3) the challenges and time involved in reaching elite categories. Junior category performance alone may not be the sole indicator of future success in track cycling. However, integrating performance analyses with practitioners and athletes’ perspectives enables a deeper understanding of the results and the developmental context. Full article
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13 pages, 1722 KiB  
Article
Acute Effect of Passive Hyperthermia on Lactate Concentrations
by Jesús Siquier-Coll, Juan Manuel Flores, Francisco Javier Grijota, Ignacio Bartolomé, Marcos Maynar-Mariño and Víctor Toro-Román
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(7), 2895; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14072895 - 29 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background: Knowledge on the effect of heat on recovery is still incomplete. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of a passive acute hyperthermic stimulus before and after a lactic anaerobic test on the production and oxidation of lactate blood concentrations. In [...] Read more.
Background: Knowledge on the effect of heat on recovery is still incomplete. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of a passive acute hyperthermic stimulus before and after a lactic anaerobic test on the production and oxidation of lactate blood concentrations. In addition, the purpose was to evaluate the effect that the application of this previous hyperthermic stimulus may have on the athletic performance in the test. Methods: For this purpose, a cross-over design through an anaerobic treadmill test in three different situations (normothermia, pre-test hyperthermia, and post-test hyperthermia) was performed. Twelve male subjects participated (age: 21.25 ± 1.64 years; height: 1.76 m ± 0.08; weight: 72.59 ± 9.44 kg). An anthropometric assessment was carried out with weight, height, skinfolds, body perimeters and diameters, and external and internal body temperatures in each of the tests. A nutritional survey was also carried out 48 h prior to each test. Results: The results of the study showed a decrease in blood lactate concentrations when the hyperthermic effect was applied as passive recovery just after the end of the test (p < 0.05). A decrease in lactate concentrations was also achieved when applying the hyperthermic effect just before the start of the test (p < 0.05). However, no significant improvements were obtained from this application of heat on test performance. Conclusions: The results suggest that the application of passive acute hyperthermia has a favourable effect in terms of decreasing blood lactate concentrations in a 5 min recovery period after lactic anaerobic activity. Full article
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