Interactions between Gut Microbiota and Immune System

A special issue of Biomedicines (ISSN 2227-9059). This special issue belongs to the section "Immunology and Immunotherapy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2024) | Viewed by 4656

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
BRABE Group, Faculty of Life Sciences and Nature, University of Nebrija, 28015 Madrid, Spain
Interests: gut microbiota; cognition; neurodegeneration; neuromodulation; brain

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The relationship between the gut and the immune system is a complex and dynamic one, with significant implications for overall health and well-being. The gut, also known as the "second brain," contains a vast network of neurons that communicate with the central nervous system. Additionally, the gut microbiota plays a crucial role in regulating immune function. Recent research has shown that gut health can affect immune function, particularly in cases of digestive disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome.

Understanding the gut–immune axis is essential to comprehend the interconnectedness of the body's systems and the potential for new approaches to treating various conditions. Ongoing research on the gut–immune axis has the potential to greatly improve our understanding of health and well-being.

This Special Issue aims to bring together the latest research on the gut–immune axis, showcasing the interplay between the digestive system and immune function and their impact on overall health. Researchers from diverse disciplines, including immunology, gastroenterology, neuroscience and medicine, are encouraged to submit articles and contribute to this exciting and rapidly evolving field.

The topics covered in this Special Issue will range from the effects of gut microbiota on immune function to the role of immune function in various conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease and autoimmune disorders. By exploring the gut–immune axis, we can gain new insights into the relationship between the gut and immune system and their impact on overall health and well-being. Furthermore, the extended implication of the brain as well as the impact of changes in the gut–immune axis on cognition will be addressed.

In conclusion, understanding the gut–immune–brain axis is crucial to comprehend the interconnectedness of the body's systems and the potential for new approaches to treating various conditions. This Special Issue offers a platform for researchers from diverse disciplines to contribute their expertise to this exciting and rapidly evolving field, enabling us to gain new insights into the complex relationship between the gut and immune system and their impact on overall health and well-being.

Topics:

  • The role of the gut microbiota in regulating immune function;
  • The gut–brain axis and its influence on the immune system;
  • The effect of antibiotics on the gut–immune axis and long-term health outcomes;
  • The gut–immune axis in aging and age-related diseases;
  • The potential for fecal microbiota transplantation to modulate the gut–immune axis;
  • The impact of environmental toxins on the gut–immune axis;
  • The gut–immune axis in autoimmune diseases;
  • The effect of chronic inflammation on the gut–immune axis and overall health;
  • The gut–immune axis and its role in infectious disease susceptibility;
  • The potential for microbiome-targeted therapies in the treatment of immune-related disorders.

We invite colleagues to submit their research on gut–immune interaction for publication in this Special Issue. This rapidly growing field of study highlights the interconnectedness of the central nervous system, muscles and digestive system and their impact on overall health and well-being. We welcome original research articles and reviews that explore this exciting and evolving field.

Dr. Ismael Martínez-Guardado
Dr. Natalia Arias
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomedicines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gut microbiota
  • immune system
  • brain
  • diseases
  • therapy

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

17 pages, 822 KiB  
Review
Examining the Interaction between Exercise, Gut Microbiota, and Neurodegeneration: Future Research Directions
by Daniel Rojas-Valverde, Diego A. Bonilla, Luis M. Gómez-Miranda, Juan J. Calleja-Núñez, Natalia Arias and Ismael Martínez-Guardado
Biomedicines 2023, 11(8), 2267; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomedicines11082267 - 14 Aug 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4292
Abstract
Physical activity has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on gut microbial diversity and function. Emerging research has revealed certain aspects of the complex interactions between the gut, exercise, microbiota, and neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting that changes in gut microbial diversity and metabolic [...] Read more.
Physical activity has been demonstrated to have a significant impact on gut microbial diversity and function. Emerging research has revealed certain aspects of the complex interactions between the gut, exercise, microbiota, and neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting that changes in gut microbial diversity and metabolic function may have an impact on the onset and progression of neurological conditions. This study aimed to review the current literature from several databases until 1 June 2023 (PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Google Scholar) on the interplay between the gut, physical exercise, microbiota, and neurodegeneration. We summarized the roles of exercise and gut microbiota on neurodegeneration and identified the ways in which these are all connected. The gut–brain axis is a complex and multifaceted network that has gained considerable attention in recent years. Research indicates that gut microbiota plays vital roles in metabolic shifts during physiological or pathophysiological conditions in neurodegenerative diseases; therefore, they are closely related to maintaining overall health and well-being. Similarly, exercise has shown positive effects on brain health and cognitive function, which may reduce/delay the onset of severe neurological disorders. Exercise has been associated with various neurochemical changes, including alterations in cortisol levels, increased production of endorphins, endocannabinoids like anandamide, as well as higher levels of serotonin and dopamine. These changes have been linked to mood improvements, enhanced sleep quality, better motor control, and cognitive enhancements resulting from exercise-induced effects. However, further clinical research is necessary to evaluate changes in bacteria taxa along with age- and sex-based differences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactions between Gut Microbiota and Immune System)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop