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Hyperthermia, Exercise and Health

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2023) | Viewed by 12876

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Center for Higher Education Alberta Giménez, Affiliated to Comillas Pontifical University, 07013 Palma, Spain
Interests: heat stress; heat acclimation; performance optimization; physiological adaptions; trace elements; health; oxidative stress
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Education, Pontifical University of Salamanca, 37007 Salamanca, Spain
Interests: exercise physiology; thermal physiology; endurance training; strength training; exercise nutrition; heat stress and exercise; trance and toxic minerals and exercise
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The human body performs homeostatic adaptations to maintain a constant core body temperature. Therefore, during physical exercise, especially in a hot environment, the concept of heat stress appears, which can be defined as the stressful effect developed by high temperature environments on the human organism, resulting in the accumulation of body heat and a consequent elevation of its temperature. This effect leads to different acute responses in sport performance.

Heat stress triggers responses in isolated situations, as is the case with training. However, if heat exposure is repeated and systematic, it elicits adaptative responses, leading to heat acclimation. These adaptations could be beneficial to optimize athletic performance in all sport manifestations and health.

Thus, it is important to prompt research on the acute and chronic effects of heat on sport performance given the increase in environmental temperature due to global warming and emerging competitions in heat stress environments, such as the Olympic Games in Tokyo or the FIFA World Cup in Qatar. Therefore, this Special Issue encourages the submission of scientific papers on the physiological effects of heat stress on sport performance and health.

Dr. Diego Muñoz Marín
Dr. Jesús Siquier Coll
Dr. Ignacio Bartolomé
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • heat stress
  • heat acclimation
  • sport performance
  • health
  • sauna baths
  • hot environments
  • core temperature
  • heat adaptions
  • skin temperature
  • exercise
  • strength
  • sports
  • exercise physiology

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1443 KiB  
Article
Characteristics of Official Wheelchair Basketball Games in Hot and Temperate Conditions
by Fabian Grossmann, Joelle Leonie Flueck, Bart Roelands, Romain Meeusen, Barry Mason and Claudio Perret
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1250; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031250 - 23 Jan 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2138
Abstract
This study compared performance parameters of two wheelchair basketball games under hot (30.3 °C, 52% relative humidity) and temperate (21.6 °C, 30% relative humidity) environmental conditions and described the characteristics of wheelchair basketball. Eight wheelchair basketball players from two teams were monitored during [...] Read more.
This study compared performance parameters of two wheelchair basketball games under hot (30.3 °C, 52% relative humidity) and temperate (21.6 °C, 30% relative humidity) environmental conditions and described the characteristics of wheelchair basketball. Eight wheelchair basketball players from two teams were monitored during two games using an indoor position tracking system. Total distance, mean- and peak-speed, playing-time, number of sprints, sprints per minute, heart rate and rate of perceived exertion were recorded. Additionally, athletes with a lesion level above and below T6 were compared. No measured parameter differed between the games. Across quarters (Q) mean velocity (m/s) (Q1: 1.01; Q2: 1.10; Q3: 1.18; Q4: 1.06; p < 0.001) and sprints per minute (Q1: 16; Q2: 14; Q3: 23; Q4: 14; p = 0.033) differed significantly, independent of the conditions. Descriptive statistics did not reveal differences between the groups with a lesion level below or above T6. In the present study, hot environmental conditions seemed not to have an impact on activity parameters of wheelchair basketball players. It was speculated that the game intensity and therefore metabolic heat production was too low; consequently, the athletes had a sufficient heat loss to prevent a decrease in performance during the play in hot conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperthermia, Exercise and Health)
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9 pages, 816 KiB  
Article
Determining Validity of Critical Power Estimated Using a Three-Minute All-Out Test in Hot Environments
by Yu-Hsuan Kuo, Ching-Feng Cheng and Yu-Chi Kuo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9193; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179193 - 31 Aug 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1923
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of heat on the validity of end-test power (EP) derived from a 3-min all-out test (3MT), which is considered as an alternative method for determining the conventional critical power. Twelve male cyclists were [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of heat on the validity of end-test power (EP) derived from a 3-min all-out test (3MT), which is considered as an alternative method for determining the conventional critical power. Twelve male cyclists were required to perform incremental exercise tests (IET) and 3MTs in both high temperature (HT; 35 °C) and thermoneutral temperature (NT; 22 °C) environments. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), and first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2, respectively) against the power output (wVO2max, wVT1, and wVT2) were measured during IETs. EP was recorded during the 3MTs. A significant correlation was observed between wVT2 and EP under NT (r = 0.674, p < 0.05) and under HT (r = 0.672, p < 0.05). However, wVO2max, wVT1, wVT2, and EP were significantly higher in NT than in HT (p < 0.05). In conclusion, although the physiological stress induced by HT might impair exercise performance, the EP derived from 3MT can validly estimate wVT2 under HT conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperthermia, Exercise and Health)
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14 pages, 5587 KiB  
Article
Acute Effects of Tecar Therapy on Skin Temperature, Ankle Mobility and Hyperalgesia in Myofascial Pain Syndrome in Professional Basketball Players: A Pilot Study
by Mireia Yeste-Fabregat, Luis Baraja-Vegas, Juan Vicente-Mampel, Marcelino Pérez-Bermejo, Iker J. Bautista González and Carlos Barrios
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8756; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168756 - 19 Aug 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 5407
Abstract
(1) Background: Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a clinical condition characterized by localized non-inflammatory musculoskeletal pain caused by myofascial trigger points. Diathermy or Tecar therapy (TT) is a form of noninvasive electro-thermal therapy classified as deep thermotherapy based on the application of electric [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a clinical condition characterized by localized non-inflammatory musculoskeletal pain caused by myofascial trigger points. Diathermy or Tecar therapy (TT) is a form of noninvasive electro-thermal therapy classified as deep thermotherapy based on the application of electric currents. This technique is characterized by immediate effects, and its being used by high performance athletes. (2) Methods: A total of thirty-two participants were included in the study who were professional basketball players. There was a 15-person Control Group and a 17-person Intervention Group. TT was applied in the Intervention Group, while TT with the device switched off (SHAM) was applied in the Control Group. The effects were evaluated through the Lunge test, infrared thermography, and pressure threshold algometry at baseline, 15, and 30 min after the intervention. (3) Results: the Intervention Group exhibited a greater increase in absolute temperature (F[1,62] = 4.60, p = 0.040, η2p = 0.13) compared to the Control Group. There were no differences between the groups in the Lunge Test (F[1.68,53.64] = 2.91, p = 0.072, η2p = 0.08) or in pressure algometry (visual analog scale, VAS) (F[3.90] = 0.73, p = 0.539, η2p = 0.02). No significant short-term significant differences were found in the rest of the variables. (4) Conclusions: Diathermy can induce changes in the absolute temperature of the medial gastrocnemius muscle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperthermia, Exercise and Health)
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15 pages, 1225 KiB  
Article
Effect of Handgrip Training in Extreme Heat on the Development of Handgrip Maximal Isometric Strength among Young Males
by Ignacio Bartolomé, Jesús Siquier-Coll, Mario Pérez-Quintero, María Concepción Robles-Gil, Diego Muñoz and Marcos Maynar-Mariño
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5240; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105240 - 14 May 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2243
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute and adaptive effects of passive extreme heat (100 ± 3 °C) exposition in combination with a strength training protocol on maximal isometric handgrip strength. Fifty-four untrained male university students participated in this investigation. [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute and adaptive effects of passive extreme heat (100 ± 3 °C) exposition in combination with a strength training protocol on maximal isometric handgrip strength. Fifty-four untrained male university students participated in this investigation. Twenty-nine formed the control group (NG) and 25 the heat-exposed group (HG). All the participants performed a 3-week isotonic handgrip strength training program twice a week with a training volume of 10 series of 10 repetitions with 45-s rest between series, per session. All the subjects only trained their right hand, leaving their left hand untrained. HG performed the same training protocol in hot (100 ± 3 °C) conditions in a dry sauna. Maximal isometric handgrip strength was evaluated each training day before and after the session. NG participants did not experience any modifications in either hand by the end of the study while HG increased maximal strength values in both hands (p < 0.05), decreased the difference between hands (p < 0.05), and recorded higher values than the controls in the trained (p < 0.05) and untrained (p < 0.01) hands after the intervention period. These changes were not accompanied by any modification in body composition in either group. The performance of a unilateral isotonic handgrip strength program in hot conditions during the three weeks induced an increase in maximal isometric handgrip strength in both hands without modifications to bodyweight or absolute body composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperthermia, Exercise and Health)
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