Topic Editors

School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Xi'an 710061, China

Ecosystem Change, Infectious Diseases Transmission and Early Warning

Abstract submission deadline
closed (30 June 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (31 August 2023)
Viewed by
13700

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Infectious disease transmission is associated with significant health, economic, and social consequences. Understanding of the ecosystem change that drives infectious disease transmission is useful to develop climate- and weather-driven early warning systems. Development of spatial and temporal models to link socioenvironmental factors constitutes a novel approach to improving infectious disease surveillance and control efforts. We invite investigators to contribute review articles as well as original research articles that focus on environmental change and infectious disease transmission.

The topics should help to further understand the impact of social and environmental factors on infectious disease transmission. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  1. Application articles in environmental changes and infectious disease transmission, such as identifying and modeling the impacts of weather and climate variability on infectious disease transmission;
  2. Methodological articles that outline new developments in the areas of geographic information system, time series, and spatial modeling in environmental health and infectious diseases;
  3. Review articles shedding insights into environmental change and infectious disease transmission.

Prof. Dr. Wenbiao Hu
Dr. Xin Qi
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • infectious disease transmission
  • weather variability
  • environmental change
  • climate change
  • time series analysis
  • spatial epidemiology
  • forecast
  • bushfires
  • floods
  • heatwaves

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Atmosphere
atmosphere
2.9 4.1 2010 17.7 Days CHF 2400
Infectious Disease Reports
idr
3.2 3.2 2009 27.2 Days CHF 1800
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ijerph
- 5.4 2004 29.6 Days CHF 2500
Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease
tropicalmed
2.9 4.1 2016 19.4 Days CHF 2700
Viruses
viruses
4.7 7.1 2009 13.8 Days CHF 2600

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Published Papers (7 papers)

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9 pages, 644 KiB  
Case Report
A Case Series of Potential Pediatric Cyanotoxin Exposures Associated with Harmful Algal Blooms in Northwest Ohio
by Benjamin W. French, Rajat Kaul, Jerrin George, Steven T. Haller, David J. Kennedy and Deepa Mukundan
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2023, 15(6), 726-734; https://doi.org/10.3390/idr15060065 - 20 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1099
Abstract
Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) are increasing in prevalence and severity in the Great Lakes region, as well as both globally and locally. CyanoHABs have the potential to cause adverse effects on human health due to the production of cyanotoxins from cyanobacteria. Common [...] Read more.
Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHABs) are increasing in prevalence and severity in the Great Lakes region, as well as both globally and locally. CyanoHABs have the potential to cause adverse effects on human health due to the production of cyanotoxins from cyanobacteria. Common routes of exposure include recreational exposure (swimming, skiing, and boating), ingestion, and aerosolization of contaminated water sources. Cyanotoxins have been shown to adversely affect several major organ systems contributing to hepatotoxicity, gastrointestinal distress, and pulmonary inflammation. We present three pediatric case reports that coincided with CyanoHABs exposure with a focus on presentation of illness, diagnostic work-up, and treatment of CyanoHAB-related illnesses. Potential cyanotoxin exposure occurred while swimming in the Maumee River and Maumee Bay of Lake Erie in Ohio during the summer months with confirmed CyanoHAB activity. Primary symptoms included generalized macular rash, fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and severe respiratory distress. Significant labs included leukocytosis and elevated C-reactive protein. All patients ultimately recovered with supportive care. Symptoms following potential cyanotoxin exposure coincide with multiple disease states representing an urgent need to develop specific diagnostic tests of exposure. Full article
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16 pages, 661 KiB  
Review
Physiotherapy Methods Applied in the Prevention of Functional Loss Associated with Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 Infection: An Overview
by Izabela Mendonça de Assis, Bianca Callegari and Maisa Silva de Sousa
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2023, 15(5), 478-493; https://doi.org/10.3390/idr15050048 - 31 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1216
Abstract
To achieve the objective of this study, we conducted a narrative review on physical therapeutic modalities applied to prevent functional losses associated with human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) infections to promote health education and viable and accessible alternatives in the development of health [...] Read more.
To achieve the objective of this study, we conducted a narrative review on physical therapeutic modalities applied to prevent functional losses associated with human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) infections to promote health education and viable and accessible alternatives in the development of health education technology adapted to the home environment. This study comprised a qualitative stage of theoretical development to construct a digital booklet with an observational basis based on studies that reiterate themes about educational technologies as tools to conduct a home protocol of guided exercises without the direct supervision of professional physical therapists. Results indicate a lack of research on the development of health education technologies to assist patients with HTLV-1 without tropical spastic paraparesis or HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). We believe that this narrative review can initiate a theoretical framework to conduct a home exercise program aimed at people with HTLV-1 who have subtle symptoms, and also at people without the clinical definition of HAM/TSP, helping to train human resources for care and research on the subject and increase scientific production in physical therapy. Full article
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9 pages, 2335 KiB  
Case Report
Severe Typhoid Fever Complicated by Superior Mesenteric and Splenic Vein Thrombosis
by Piero Veronese, Marco Pappalardo, Valentina Maffini, Monica Rubini, Alessandra Giacometti, Maria Beatrice Ruozi, Simone Cella and Icilio Dodi
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2023, 15(4), 377-385; https://doi.org/10.3390/idr15040038 - 08 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1404
Abstract
Typhoid fever (Typhoid or enteric fever) is still the most common bacterial bloodstream infection worldwide, caused by Salmonella typhi. The transmission route is indirect through passive vehicles such as contaminated water or food. Main clinical findings are a fever lasting more than [...] Read more.
Typhoid fever (Typhoid or enteric fever) is still the most common bacterial bloodstream infection worldwide, caused by Salmonella typhi. The transmission route is indirect through passive vehicles such as contaminated water or food. Main clinical findings are a fever lasting more than three days, abdominal symptoms, leukocytosis, and anemia. Typhoid can cause a wide range of multi-organ complications. We report a particularly severe form of this infection complicated by superior mesenteric vein and splenic vein thrombosis, an extremely uncommon manifestation. Full article
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15 pages, 15004 KiB  
Article
Genotypic Determination of Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases and Carbapenemase Production in Clinical Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae in Southwest Nigeria
by Gbolabo Odewale, Motunrayo Yemisi Jibola-Shittu, Olusola Ojurongbe, Rita Ayanbolade Olowe and Olugbenga Adekunle Olowe
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2023, 15(3), 339-353; https://doi.org/10.3390/idr15030034 - 20 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2078
Abstract
Introduction: Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major pathogen implicated in healthcare-associated infections. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae isolates are a public health concern. This study investigated the existence of some ESBL and carbapenemase genes among clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae in Southwest [...] Read more.
Introduction: Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major pathogen implicated in healthcare-associated infections. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae isolates are a public health concern. This study investigated the existence of some ESBL and carbapenemase genes among clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae in Southwest Nigeria and additionally determined their circulating clones. Materials and Methods: Various clinical samples from 420 patients from seven tertiary hospitals within Southwestern Nigeria were processed between February 2018 and July 2019. These samples were cultured on blood agar and MacConkey agar, and the isolated bacteria were identified by Microbact GNB 12E. All K. pneumoniae were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the 16s rRNA gene. Antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) was done on these isolates, and the PCR was used to evaluate the common ESBL-encoding genes and carbapenem resistance genes. Genotyping was performed using multi-locus sequencing typing (MLST). Results: The overall prevalence of K. pneumoniae in Southwestern Nigeria was 30.5%. The AST revealed high resistance rates to tetracyclines (67.2%), oxacillin (61.7%), ampicillin (60.2%), ciprofloxacin (58.6%), chloramphenicol (56.3%), and lowest resistance to meropenem (43.0%). All isolates were susceptible to polymyxin B. The most prevalent ESBL gene was the TEM gene (47.7%), followed by CTX-M (43.8%), SHV (39.8%), OXA (27.3%), CTX-M-15 (19.5%), CTX-M-2 (11.1%), and CTX-M-9 (10.9%). Among the carbapenemase genes studied, the VIM gene (43.0%) was most detected, followed by OXA-48 (28.9%), IMP (22.7%), NDM (17.2%), KPC (13.3%), CMY (11.7%), and FOX (9.4%). GIM and SPM genes were not detected. MLST identified six different sequence types (STs) in this study. The most dominant ST was ST307 (50%, 5/10), while ST258, ST11, ST147, ST15, and ST321 had (10%, 1/10) each. Conclusion: High antimicrobial resistance in K. pneumoniae is a clear and present danger for managing infections in Nigeria. Additionally, the dominance of a successful international ST307 clone highlights the importance of ensuring that genomic surveillance remains a priority in the hospital environment in Nigeria. Full article
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13 pages, 2223 KiB  
Article
Mapping the Spatiotemporal Distribution of Bovine Rabies in Colombia, 2005–2019
by D. Katterine Bonilla-Aldana, S. Daniela Jimenez-Diaz, Joshuan J. Barboza and Alfonso J. Rodriguez-Morales
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2022, 7(12), 406; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed7120406 - 29 Nov 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2059
Abstract
Introduction: Rabies is caused by a virus belonging to the genus Lyssavirus and family Rhabdoviridae, which can infect any mammal including humans. Hematophagous, fructivorous, and insectivorous bats have become the main reservoir of sylvatic rabies in Latin America. In the sylvatic cycle, hematophagous [...] Read more.
Introduction: Rabies is caused by a virus belonging to the genus Lyssavirus and family Rhabdoviridae, which can infect any mammal including humans. Hematophagous, fructivorous, and insectivorous bats have become the main reservoir of sylvatic rabies in Latin America. In the sylvatic cycle, hematophagous bats are usually the main reservoir. In contrast, dogs and cats fulfil this critical role in the urban cycle. However, in rural areas, the most affected animals are bovines. They show clinical signs such as behavioural changes, hypersalivation, muscle tremors, spasms caused by extensive damage to the central nervous system, and death from respiratory paralysis. Objective: To describe the spatiotemporal distribution of bovine rabies in Colombia from 2005 to 2019. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional descriptive observational study, based on the monthly reports of the Colombian Agricultural Institute (ICA) on the surveillance of bovine rabies in Colombia from 2005 to 2019, retrieved from its official website. The data were converted to databases in Microsoft Access 365®. Multiple epidemiological maps were developed with the GIS software Kosmo RC1® 3.0 coupled to the shape files (.shp) of all the country’s municipalities. Results: During the study period, 4888 cases of rabies were confirmed in cattle, ranging from a peak of 542 cases (11.1%) in 2014 to 43 in 2019 (0.88%). From 2014 to 2019, there has been a significant reduction in the annual national number of cases (r2 = 0.9509, p < 0.05). In 2019, 32.6% of the cases occurred in January, and 48.8% occurred in the department of Sucre. In 2009, the maximum number of spatial clusters (13) occurred in the Orinoquia region, where other clusters were also identified in 2005, 2006 and 2008. In 2018, 98 outbreaks were identified that led to the death of cattle and other animals, 28.6% of them in the department of Sucre. In the first half of 2019, of 38 outbreaks, 55.2% were identified in Sucre. Conclusions: It is necessary to review the current national program for the prevention and control of rabies in cattle, incorporating concepts from the ecology of bats, as well as the prediction of contagion waves of geographical and temporal spread in the context of the OneHealth Approach. Sylvatic rabies remains a threat in Colombia that requires further study. Full article
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10 pages, 975 KiB  
Review
The COVID-19 Impact on the Trends in Yellow Fever and Lassa Fever Infections in Nigeria
by Nnennaya U. Opara, Ugochinyere I. Nwagbara and Khumbulani W. Hlongwana
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2022, 14(6), 932-941; https://doi.org/10.3390/idr14060091 - 21 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2142
Abstract
Lassa fever (LF) and yellow fever (YF) belong to a group of viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs). These viruses have common features and damages the organs and blood vessels; they also impair the body’s homeostasis. Some VHFs cause mild disease, while some cause severe [...] Read more.
Lassa fever (LF) and yellow fever (YF) belong to a group of viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs). These viruses have common features and damages the organs and blood vessels; they also impair the body’s homeostasis. Some VHFs cause mild disease, while some cause severe disease and death such as in the case of Ebola or Marburg. LF virus and YF virus are two of the most recent emerging viruses in Africa, resulting in severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. Lassa fever virus is continuously on the rise both in Nigeria and neighboring countries in West Africa, with an estimate of over 500,000 cases of LF, and 5000 deaths, annually. YF virus is endemic in temperate climate regions of Africa, Central America (Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador), and South America (such as Brazil, Argentina, Peru, and Chile) with an annual estimated cases of 200,000 and 30,000 deaths globally. This review examines the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the trend in epidemiology of these two VHFs to delineate responses that are associated with protective or pathogenic outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Ecosystem Change, Infectious Diseases Transmission and Early Warning)
(This article belongs to the Section Viral Infections)
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11 pages, 1607 KiB  
Article
Genetic Evolution Analysis and Host Characteristics of Hantavirus in Yunnan Province, China
by Na Wang, Jia-Xiang Yin, Yao Zhang, Li Wu, Wen-Hong Li, Yun-Yan Luo, Rui Li, Zi-Wei Li and Shu-Qing Liu
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(20), 13433; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192013433 - 18 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1475
Abstract
For a long time, the epidemic situation of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) caused by hantavirus (HV) in Yunnan Province of China has been relatively severe. The molecular epidemiology and host characteristics of HV in Yunnan Province are still not completely clear, [...] Read more.
For a long time, the epidemic situation of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) caused by hantavirus (HV) in Yunnan Province of China has been relatively severe. The molecular epidemiology and host characteristics of HV in Yunnan Province are still not completely clear, and the systematic and long-term investigation of the epidemic area is very limited. In this study, a total of 488 murine-shaped animals were captured in the three regions of Mile City, Mangshi City and Lianghe County in Yunnan Province, and then the type of HV was identified by multiplex real-time RT-PCR and sequenced. The results indicate that 2.46% of the murine-shaped animal specimens were infected with HV. A new subtype of Seoul virus (SEOV) was found in the rare rat species Rattus nitidus in Lianghe County, and the two strains of this new subtype were named YNLH-K40 and YNLH-K53. Through the phylogenetic analysis of this new subtype, it is shown that this new subtype is very similar to the type S5 of SEOV, which is previously described as the main cause for the high incidence of HFRS in Longquan City, Zhejiang Province, China. This new subtype is highly likely to cause human infection and disease. Therefore, in addition to further promoting the improvement of the HV gene database and strengthening the discovery and monitoring of the host animals in Yunnan Province, more attention should be paid to the pathogenic potential of the newly discovered HV type. Full article
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