Topic Editors

College of Economics and Management, Northwest A&F University, Xianyang 712100, China
1. College of Economics and Management, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
2. Academy of Global Food Economics and Policy, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China

Consumer Behaviour and Healthy Food Consumption

Abstract submission deadline
20 September 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
20 November 2024
Viewed by
11420

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the rapid changes in urbanization and economic development, especially following the COVID-19 pandemic, consumption behaviors have changed remarkably. Meanwhile, as a result of the pursuit of healthy diets and lifestyles, the demand for healthy food is increasing, leading to significant changes in healthy food consumption. Therefore, along the entire food value chain, food strategies should not solely focus on ensuring food security but also highlight the importance of adequate quantities of safe and good quality foods, helping individuals to achieve a healthy diet. Consumption behaviors and the consumption of healthy food are influenced by various factors through numerous complex interactions. These factors include family income, individual preferences, geographical and environmental factors, cultural and ethical traditions, food prices, and the food environment, as well as food supplements, all of which interact with each other and shape dietary consumption patterns in specific ways. This topic aims to gather studies from various aspects to understand how and to what extent consumer behavior is affected by different aspects and their consequences on healthy food consumption. To bring together the latest developments in consumer behavior and healthy food consumption, potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Household food consumption patterns;
  • Food preference and consumption behavior;
  • Unhealthy or risky consumption behavior;
  • The role of food environment in food consumption;
  • Nutrition transition and nutrition-related health issues;
  • Dietary quality and nutrition outcomes;
  • Agricultural food- and organic food-related issues;
  • Health food consumption
  • Future perspectives for food consumption;
  • Potential challenges for the health market.

Prof. Dr. Yanjun Ren
Dr. Qiran Zhao
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • consumer behavior
  • food consumption
  • food security
  • healthy diet
  • agricultural food
  • health food market

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agriculture
agriculture
3.6 3.6 2011 17.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Agronomy
agronomy
3.7 5.2 2011 15.8 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Businesses
businesses
- - 2021 23.8 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Economies
economies
2.6 3.2 2013 21.4 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Foods
foods
5.2 5.8 2012 13.1 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Nutrients
nutrients
5.9 9.0 2009 14.5 Days CHF 2900 Submit

Preprints.org is a multidiscipline platform providing preprint service that is dedicated to sharing your research from the start and empowering your research journey.

MDPI Topics is cooperating with Preprints.org and has built a direct connection between MDPI journals and Preprints.org. Authors are encouraged to enjoy the benefits by posting a preprint at Preprints.org prior to publication:

  1. Immediately share your ideas ahead of publication and establish your research priority;
  2. Protect your idea from being stolen with this time-stamped preprint article;
  3. Enhance the exposure and impact of your research;
  4. Receive feedback from your peers in advance;
  5. Have it indexed in Web of Science (Preprint Citation Index), Google Scholar, Crossref, SHARE, PrePubMed, Scilit and Europe PMC.

Published Papers (9 papers)

Order results
Result details
Journals
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
30 pages, 956 KiB  
Article
Consumer Perceptions of the Canadian Salmon Sector and Their Associations with Behaviors: A Perspective from Indigenous Rights
by Sylvain Charlebois, Ning Sun, Ken Paul, Isaiah Robinson, Stefanie M. Colombo, Janet Music, Swati Saxena, Keshava Pallavi Gone and Janele Vezeau
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1309; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091309 - 24 Apr 2024
Abstract
Previous studies on consumer perceptions and behaviors of salmon have often neglected Indigenous rights within the Canadian salmon sector. This study innovatively addresses this gap by integrating Indigenous rights into the current analysis, alongside considerations of sustainability practices, socio-economic impacts, and consumer motivations. [...] Read more.
Previous studies on consumer perceptions and behaviors of salmon have often neglected Indigenous rights within the Canadian salmon sector. This study innovatively addresses this gap by integrating Indigenous rights into the current analysis, alongside considerations of sustainability practices, socio-economic impacts, and consumer motivations. Our research objectives aim to fit three consumer perceptions—environmental sustainability, economic considerations, and Indigenous rights—and to evaluate their associations, alongside perception of a price increase, socio-demographics, and consumer motivation factors, with purchasing behaviors related to Canadian salmon products. Data for this study was collected from a nationwide online survey. Responses to Question 2 and Question 35 are encoded with numerical values ranging from 1 to 5, where larger numbers indicate stronger agreement with the statement. The inclusion of methodologies such as the Graded Response Model (GRM) and Cumulative Link Models (CLM) adds another innovative dimension to this study. Our findings demonstrate how consumer profiles are associated with these four perceptions and their underlying determinants. Furthermore, the study quantifies the influence of these four perceptions on each consumer purchase behavior. The implications of these findings extend to the realm of mathematical modeling in consumer decision-making processes, offering practical insights for businesses and marketers, and emphasizing the importance of implementing regulatory frameworks and initiatives that promote sustainability, safeguard Indigenous rights, and address socio-economic disparities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Behaviour and Healthy Food Consumption)
18 pages, 495 KiB  
Article
A Cross-Sectional Study of Sports Food Consumption Patterns, Experiences, and Perceptions amongst Non-Athletes in Australia
by Celeste I. Chapple, Alissa J. Burnett, Julie L. Woods and Catherine G. Russell
Nutrients 2024, 16(8), 1101; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16081101 - 09 Apr 2024
Viewed by 421
Abstract
Sports foods are designed for athletes, yet their availability, type, and sales have increased over the past decade, likely driven by non-athlete use. This could lead to detrimental health outcomes via over/misuse or unwanted side effects. The aim of this study was to [...] Read more.
Sports foods are designed for athletes, yet their availability, type, and sales have increased over the past decade, likely driven by non-athlete use. This could lead to detrimental health outcomes via over/misuse or unwanted side effects. The aim of this study was to describe sports food consumption patterns and associated drivers, consumption reasons, perception of risks, and side effects experienced amongst non-athletes in Australia. In 2022, n = 307 non-athlete Australian adults (18–65 years) completed an online cross-sectional survey including closed-ended (consumption patterns, factors, and exercise participation) and open-ended questions (reasons for consumption, risk perception, and side effects experienced). Descriptive statistics (frequency and percent) described the sample. Ordinal logistic regression was used for univariate associations and a multivariate model was used to determine relationships between sports food consumption proxy and significant univariate associations. The themes were analysed via inductive thematic analysis using NVivo 14. Females consumed sports foods most frequently, 65% of participants consumed three or more sports foods, and participants with higher sports food consumption/frequency were less likely to perceive risks or experience side effects. The main reason for consumption was protein intake, digestion/stomach issues were the main perceived risks, and the main side effect was bloating. Despite understanding the risks and side effects, non-athlete consumers continue to use numerous sports foods, which appear to be influenced by sociodemographic factors and packaging labels. Tighter regulation of packaging-label information would ensure safer and more informed consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Behaviour and Healthy Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 917 KiB  
Brief Report
How Promising Are “Ultraprocessed” Front-of-Package Labels? A Formative Study with US Adults
by Aline D’Angelo Campos, Shu Wen Ng, Katherine McNeel and Marissa G. Hall
Nutrients 2024, 16(7), 1072; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16071072 - 06 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1093
Abstract
High levels of food processing can have detrimental health effects independent of nutrient content. Experts and advocates have proposed adding information about food processing status to front-of-package labeling schemes, which currently exclusively focus on nutrient content. How consumers would perceive “ultraprocessed” labels has [...] Read more.
High levels of food processing can have detrimental health effects independent of nutrient content. Experts and advocates have proposed adding information about food processing status to front-of-package labeling schemes, which currently exclusively focus on nutrient content. How consumers would perceive “ultraprocessed” labels has not yet been examined. To address this gap, we conducted a within-subjects online experiment with a convenience sample of 600 US adults. Participants viewed a product under three labeling conditions (control, “ultraprocessed” label, and “ultraprocessed” plus “high in sugar” label) in random order for a single product. The “ultraprocessed” label led participants to report thinking more about the risks of eating the product and discouraging them from wanting to buy the product more than the control, despite not grabbing more attention than the control. The “ultraprocessed” plus “high in sugar” labels grabbed more attention, led participants to think more about the risks of eating the product, and discouraged them from wanting to buy the product more than the “ultraprocessed” label alone. “Ultraprocessed” labels may constitute promising messages that could work in tandem with nutrient labels, and further research should examine how they would influence consumers’ actual intentions and behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Behaviour and Healthy Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 661 KiB  
Article
Nutritional Data on Selected Food Products Consumed in Oman: An Update of the Food Composition Table and Use for Future Food Consumption Surveys
by Salima Almaamari, Ayoub Al-Jawaldeh, Ibtisam Al Ghammari, Saleh Al Shammakhi, Jokha Al Aamri and Jalila El Ati
Foods 2024, 13(5), 787; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050787 - 03 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1018
Abstract
Food composition data in the Eastern Mediterranean Region countries are often lacking, obsolete, or unreliable. The study aims to provide reliable nutrient data on food products consumed in Oman in order to evaluate their nutritional quality, the consistency of the nutrition labeling and [...] Read more.
Food composition data in the Eastern Mediterranean Region countries are often lacking, obsolete, or unreliable. The study aims to provide reliable nutrient data on food products consumed in Oman in order to evaluate their nutritional quality, the consistency of the nutrition labeling and claims, and, ultimately, the use for food consumption surveys and update the current food composition database. Contents of fat, fatty acids, carbohydrates, protein, sugars, and sodium were chemically analyzed in 221 foods and beverages. Products were classified according to their nutritional composition and the extent of processing and coded according to the FoodEx2 system. Labels and laboratory values were compared using the tolerance levels of the European Union. Results indicate that the nutrition labeling aligns with the values obtained in the laboratory, with the exception of 6.3% discrepancies in TFA content, where the reported values are higher than the appropriate reference values. The most frequent category (71.5%) was ultra-processed foods. In terms of inconsistencies in the nutritional claims, 5.1% of food products with claims did not comply with the statement “sugar-free” or “low salt”. Our study provides evidence to support the necessity of comprehensive recommendations for consumers and food industries, which are aimed at enhancing the nutritional quality of products and augmenting consumer awareness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Behaviour and Healthy Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 1256 KiB  
Article
Impacts of Habit Formation Effect on Food Consumption and Nutrient Intake in Rural China
by Jinshang Wen, Wenbo Zhu, Xinru Han and Xiudong Wang
Nutrients 2024, 16(4), 505; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16040505 - 10 Feb 2024
Viewed by 711
Abstract
This study employs panel data and a dynamic Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDS) model to investigate the habit formation effect of food consumption among Chinese rural residents and its consequential impact on nutritional intake. The dataset, spanning from 2012 to 2018, encompasses nine [...] Read more.
This study employs panel data and a dynamic Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDS) model to investigate the habit formation effect of food consumption among Chinese rural residents and its consequential impact on nutritional intake. The dataset, spanning from 2012 to 2018, encompasses nine provinces in China and involves 5390 rural households. The findings reveal that, excluding beef, mutton, and poultry, there are significant habit formation effect on the consumption of food categories, notably grains, vegetables, and edible oils. Lower-income and younger demographics demonstrate a more pronounced reliance on established dietary habits. Influenced by the habit formation effect, there is a substantial reduction in the income elasticity differences across various food types. Overlooking the habit formation effect in food consumption would lead to an underestimation of the income elasticity of energy, fat, and carbohydrates. This suggests that, over the long term, food consumption habit formation is a pivotal factor in enabling the enhancement of residents’ dietary structures, amplifying the incremental energy intake associated with income increases, and accelerating the transition towards nutritional surplus. The conclusions drawn from this study offer valuable insights for ensuring food security and nutritional balance. Policy-makers of food and nutrition strategies should duly consider the habit formation effect on residents’ food consumption, and seek to optimize dietary patterns and promote nutritional transformation by food consumption habit intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Behaviour and Healthy Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1728 KiB  
Article
The Difference between PC-Based and Immersive Virtual Reality Food Purchase Environments on Useability, Presence, and Physiological Responses
by Shelley Woodall and James H. Hollis
Foods 2024, 13(2), 264; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020264 - 15 Jan 2024
Viewed by 749
Abstract
Computer simulations used to study food purchasing behavior can be separated into low immersion virtual environments (LIVE), which use personal computers and standard monitors to display a scene, and high immersion virtual environments (HIVE) which use virtual reality technology such as head-mounted displays [...] Read more.
Computer simulations used to study food purchasing behavior can be separated into low immersion virtual environments (LIVE), which use personal computers and standard monitors to display a scene, and high immersion virtual environments (HIVE) which use virtual reality technology such as head-mounted displays to display a scene. These methods may differ in their ability to create feelings of presence or cybersickness that would influence the usefulness of these approaches. In this present study, thirty-one adults experienced a virtual supermarket or fast-food restaurant using a LIVE system or a HIVE system. Feelings of presence and cybersickness were measured using questionnaires or physiological responses (heart rate and electrodermal activity). The participants were also asked to rate their ability to complete the set task. The results of this study indicate that participants reported a higher sense of presence in the HIVE scenes as compared to the LIVE scenes (p < 0.05). The participant’s heart rate and electrodermal activity were significantly higher in the HIVE scene treatment when compared to the LIVE scene (p < 0.05). There was no difference in the participant’s ability to complete tasks in the different scenes. In addition, feelings of cybersickness were not different between the HIVE and LIVE scenes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Behaviour and Healthy Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 721 KiB  
Article
Advertising and Eco-Labels as Influencers of Eco-Consumer Attitudes and Awareness—Case Study of Ecuador
by Nelson Carrión-Bósquez, Iván Veas-González, Franklin Naranjo-Armijo, Mary Llamo-Burga, Oscar Ortiz-Regalado, Wilfredo Ruiz-García, Wilson Guerra-Regalado and Cristian Vidal-Silva
Foods 2024, 13(2), 228; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020228 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 2292
Abstract
This study examined the impact of green advertising and eco-labels on the attitudes and environmental awareness of millennials purchasing eco-friendly products in shopping centers across Ecuador. The research utilized a quantitative, correlational, cross-sectional methodology with 430 millennials participating. A 20-item survey was administered [...] Read more.
This study examined the impact of green advertising and eco-labels on the attitudes and environmental awareness of millennials purchasing eco-friendly products in shopping centers across Ecuador. The research utilized a quantitative, correlational, cross-sectional methodology with 430 millennials participating. A 20-item survey was administered face-to-face at shopping centers in Quito and Guayaquil, Ecuador. The validity of the research model was established through Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), employing SPSS 20 and AMOS 24 for statistical evaluations. Findings reveal that green advertising significantly shapes environmental attitudes (β: 0.245) and awareness (β: 0.110), as well as directly influences the purchasing behavior (β: 0.154) towards green products. While eco-labels do not exert a direct effect on purchasing behavior (β: 0.128), they significantly inform attitudes (β: 0.406) and ecological awareness (β: 0.277) of millennials who purchase organic products. This paper is among the pioneering research to delineate the correlation between green advertising elements and the purchasing patterns of green products among millennials in a developing nation. It concludes that marketing strategies centered on green advertising and eco-labels do affect millennials’ attitudes and environmental consciousness, but only advertising has a direct impact on purchasing behaviors, contrary to eco-labels. The research bears social significance as it affirms that millennials are attentive to environmental issues and are actively engaged in promoting sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Behaviour and Healthy Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1312 KiB  
Article
The Issue of Measuring Household Consumption Expenditure
by Emilia Madudova and Tatiana Corejova
Economies 2024, 12(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/economies12010009 - 27 Dec 2023
Viewed by 2867
Abstract
Household consumption expenditure is an important measure of economic activity as it reflects the spending behavior of households and their purchasing power. The measurement of household consumption expenditure is critical for analyzing economic growth, inflation, and overall economic performance. In order to create [...] Read more.
Household consumption expenditure is an important measure of economic activity as it reflects the spending behavior of households and their purchasing power. The measurement of household consumption expenditure is critical for analyzing economic growth, inflation, and overall economic performance. In order to create budgets and financial plans, it is necessary to know and understand the relationship between the size of households in terms of the number of members, the number of children, and their consumption needs. The aim of the research was to determine the statistical significance of the relationship between household size and consumer spending at the national (Slovak Republic) level and also to analyze the relationship between household size and spending on food as a significant component of consumer spending. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to examine the relationship between household size and consumer spending. Regression analysis with linear regression and fitting was used to determine the relationship between consumer spending and household size with different numbers of children. The results analyze the correlations and test the hypothesis of a significant difference in the types of consumption expenditure in relation to different household sizes (number of children). Results confirm significant differences in consumption expenditure between different household sizes, which confirms the importance of these results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Behaviour and Healthy Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

21 pages, 3460 KiB  
Article
Focusing on Future Consequences Enhances Self-Controlled Dietary Choices
by Johanna Kruse, Franziska M. Korb, Caroline Surrey, Uta Wolfensteller, Thomas Goschke and Stefan Scherbaum
Nutrients 2024, 16(1), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16010089 - 27 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 793
Abstract
Self-controlled dietary decisions, i.e., choosing a healthier food over a tastier one, are a major challenge for many people. Despite the potential profound consequences of frequent poor choices, maintaining a healthy diet proves challenging. This raises the question of how to facilitate self-controlled [...] Read more.
Self-controlled dietary decisions, i.e., choosing a healthier food over a tastier one, are a major challenge for many people. Despite the potential profound consequences of frequent poor choices, maintaining a healthy diet proves challenging. This raises the question of how to facilitate self-controlled food decisions to promote healthier choices. The present study compared the influence of implicit and explicit information on food choices and their underlying decision processes. Participants watched two video clips as an implicit manipulation to induce different mindsets. Instructions to focus on either the short-term or long-term consequences of choices served as an explicit manipulation. Participants performed a binary food choice task, including foods with different health and taste values. The choice was made using a computer mouse, whose trajectories we used to calculate the influence of the food properties. Instruction to focus on long-term consequences compared to short-term consequences increased the number of healthy choices, reduced response times for healthy decisions, and increased the influence of health aspects during the decision-making process. The effect of video manipulation showed greater variability. While focusing on long-term consequences facilitated healthy food choices and reduced the underlying decision conflict, the current mindset appeared to have a minor influence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Consumer Behaviour and Healthy Food Consumption)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop