Applications and Challenges of ‘Omics’ Technologies for Generation of Climate-Resilient Crop Varieties II

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Physiology and Crop Production".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 February 2023) | Viewed by 4650

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Syngenta, Jealott's Hill International Research Centre, Bracknell, Berkshire RG42 6EY, UK
Interests: wheat genetics; zea mays; GWAS; genetics; molecular biology; diversity; association mapping; weeds genetics and genomics
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Crop Diversification and Genetics, International Center for Biosaline Agriculture. UAE P.O. Box 14660, Al Ruwayyah 2, Academic City, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Interests: plant genetics and genomics; plant breeding; molecular breeding
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The term ‘omics’ includes a suite of technologies, viz., genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics and phenomics, the application of which is bringing about a revolution in crop and agricultural sciences. Omics technologies are leading to significant advances in our understanding of biological mechanisms underpinning stress tolerance and resilience in many crops. Through the utilization of an ‘omics’ approach or a combination of two or more approaches, novel and superior alleles conferring stress tolerance are being identified and many more new discoveries are being made by analyzing gene expression profiles, protein structure and interactions, metabolite composition and high-resolution phenomics of crop plants under various stress conditions. We aim to present a compilation of research articles where ‘omics’ technologies have been utilized to further deepen our understanding of the biological mechanisms underpinning stress resilience or for the genetic improvement of an important agronomic trait in crops. Review articles are also welcomed, highlighting the applications, challenges and future perspectives of ‘omics’ technologies for crop improvement.

Dr. Deepmala Sehgal
Dr. Prashant Vikram
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • genomics
  • transcriptomics
  • metabolomics
  • proteomics
  • phenomics

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 4103 KiB  
Article
Identification of QTL under Brassinosteroid-Combined Cold Treatment at Seedling Stage in Rice Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS)
by Zhifu Guo, Jialu Yao, Yishan Cheng, Wenzhong Zhang, Zhengjin Xu, Maomao Li, Jing Huang, Dianrong Ma and Minghui Zhao
Plants 2022, 11(17), 2324; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11172324 - 05 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1318
Abstract
Cold stress is a major threat to the sustainability of rice yield. Brassinosteroids (BR) application can enhance cold tolerance in rice. However, the regulatory mechanism related to cold tolerance and the BR signaling pathway in rice has not been clarified. In the current [...] Read more.
Cold stress is a major threat to the sustainability of rice yield. Brassinosteroids (BR) application can enhance cold tolerance in rice. However, the regulatory mechanism related to cold tolerance and the BR signaling pathway in rice has not been clarified. In the current study, the seedling shoot length (SSL), seedling root length (SRL), seedling dry weight (SDW), and seedling wet weight (SWW) were used as the indices for identifying cold tolerance under cold stress and BR-combined cold treatment in a backcross recombinant inbred lines (BRIL) population. According to the phenotypic characterization for cold tolerance and a high-resolution SNP genetic map obtained from the GBS technique, a total of 114 QTLs were identified, of which 27 QTLs were detected under cold stress and 87 QTLs under BR-combined cold treatment. Among them, the intervals of many QTLs were coincident under different treatments, as well as different traits. A total of 13 candidate genes associated with cold tolerance or BR pathway, such as BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT1 (OsBZR1), OsWRKY77, AP2 domain-containing protein, zinc finger proteins, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, and auxin-induced protein, were predicted. Among these, the expression levels of 10 candidate genes were identified under different treatments in the parents and representative BRIL individuals. These results were helpful in understanding the regulation relationship between cold tolerance and BR pathway in rice. Full article
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Review

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23 pages, 776 KiB  
Review
Wheat Omics: Advancements and Opportunities
by Deepmala Sehgal, Priyanka Dhakate, Heena Ambreen, Khasim Hussain Baji Shaik, Nagenahalli Dharmegowda Rathan, Nayanahalli Munireddy Anusha, Rupesh Deshmukh and Prashant Vikram
Plants 2023, 12(3), 426; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12030426 - 17 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3015
Abstract
Plant omics, which includes genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics and proteomics, has played a remarkable role in the discovery of new genes and biomolecules that can be deployed for crop improvement. In wheat, great insights have been gleaned from the utilization of diverse omics approaches [...] Read more.
Plant omics, which includes genomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics and proteomics, has played a remarkable role in the discovery of new genes and biomolecules that can be deployed for crop improvement. In wheat, great insights have been gleaned from the utilization of diverse omics approaches for both qualitative and quantitative traits. Especially, a combination of omics approaches has led to significant advances in gene discovery and pathway investigations and in deciphering the essential components of stress responses and yields. Recently, a Wheat Omics database has been developed for wheat which could be used by scientists for further accelerating functional genomics studies. In this review, we have discussed various omics technologies and platforms that have been used in wheat to enhance the understanding of the stress biology of the crop and the molecular mechanisms underlying stress tolerance. Full article
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