Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology of Crop Breeding

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Genotype Evaluation and Breeding".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 March 2023) | Viewed by 1866

Special Issue Editors

Biotechnology Division, CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur 176061, India
Interests: GWAS; QTL mapping; expression; diversity; epigenetics; transcriptome; SNP
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Biotechnology Division, CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Palampur 176061, India
Interests: wheat; abiotic stresses; gwas, methylome; transcriptome; germplasm
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Global Wheat Program, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT), Apdo Postal 6-641, Mexico City, Mexico
Interests: wheat genetics; zea mays; GWAS; genetics; molecular biology; diversity; association mapping
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Crop breeding needs continuous research to develop high yielding varieties capable of withstanding abiotic and biotic stresses. With the advancement in technologies, new molecular and genomic tools have been developed, the integration of which has revolutionized breeding programs in different crops. A number of QTLs/genes for important traits including complex traits have been identified through QTL interval mapping/ GWAS and also successfully utilized in molecular breeding to improve the particular crop. Further, the utilization of omics approaches such as transcriptomics, metabolomics, proteomics and ionomics has accelerated functional genomics studies, leading to increased understanding of the molecular mechanism of trait variation at the genome-wide level. The comparative genomics approach has facilitated the identification of important genes in orphan crops using information available in model plates. These candidate genes can be functionally characterized using molecular tools and can be utilized in breeding programs.

The current Special Issue focuses on the advancement in the existing knowledge of different molecular tools, genomic information, genes/QTLs identification and molecular breeding techniques in all crops of importance. We welcome submissions of the original papers or reviews in the mentioned area. 

Dr. Vandana Jaiswal
Dr. Vijay Gahlaut
Dr. Deepmala Sehgal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • genes
  • QTL mapping
  • transcriptome
  • methylome
  • GWAS
  • marker-assisted selection
  • functional characterization
  • genomic selection
  • marker development

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 2603 KiB  
Article
Overexpressing OsPYL/RCAR7 Improves Drought Tolerance of Maize Seedlings by Reducing Stomatal Conductance
Agriculture 2022, 12(12), 2140; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture12122140 - 13 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1197
Abstract
Drought stress is a serious abiotic factor limiting the quality and yield of maize (Zea mays). To produce maize plants with enhanced drought tolerance, we generated transgenic maize plants overexpressing OsPYL/RCAR7, encoding an abscisic acid receptor. We crossed the selected [...] Read more.
Drought stress is a serious abiotic factor limiting the quality and yield of maize (Zea mays). To produce maize plants with enhanced drought tolerance, we generated transgenic maize plants overexpressing OsPYL/RCAR7, encoding an abscisic acid receptor. We crossed the selected lines with maize variety B73 and obtained F1 hybrid seeds. Initial screening suggested that the transgenic lines were more drought tolerant than wild-type plants. Analysis using the DroughtSpotter platform indicated that expressing OsPYL/RCAR7 enhanced drought resistance in transgenic maize seedlings by reducing water loss. In addition, the stomatal conductance of the leaf surface was 30% lower in OsPYL/RCAR7-overexpressing plants than in wild-type ones. After drought treatment, OsPYL/RCAR7-overexpressing maize showed a much higher survival rate than the wild type, suggesting that expressing OsPYL/RCAR7 reduced the negative effects of drought exposure on stomatal conductance and enhanced water use efficiency. Furthermore, the expression levels of drought-tolerance–related abscisic acid–signaling genes ABP2 and RAB16A were higher in the transgenic plants than in the wild type. Taken together, our data indicate that the seedlings of transgenic maize expressing the gene OsPYL/RCAR7 showed increased tolerance to drought stress, raising the possibility that stress-related genes from monocotyledonous crops could be used as genetic resources to improve the agricultural traits of maize. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology of Crop Breeding)
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