The Role of Signaling Molecules in Plant Stress Tolerance

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 3242

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, Ufa Federal Research Centre RAS, 450054 Ufa, Russia
Interests: plant hormones; hormonal crosstalk; plant stress tolerance; plant signaling molecules; signal transduction; gene expression; reactive oxygen species

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, Ufa Federal Research Centre RAS, 450054 Ufa, Russia
Interests: crop protection; PGPB; endophytes; plant stress adaptation and tolerance; stress physiology/biochemistry
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Terrestrial plants are sessile organisms, meaning that they are permanently restricted to one place and cannot move away from harsh environmental conditions that can negatively affect their growth and development. As a result of their inability to escape, plants have evolved a wide range of effective biochemical and physiological mechanisms and efficient signal transduction pathways to rapidly respond and adapt to these stress conditions. Extracellular environmental stimuli are transmitted via signaling cascade into intracellular signals by the help of multiple signaling molecules. Plants produce numerous structurally and functionally diverse signaling molecules, including different plant hormones, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), proteins, amino acids, nucleotides, vitamins, NO, etc. They are essential for the regulation of growth and development of plants as well as for the activation of protective responses to both biotic and abiotic stresses. Moreover, there is a growing evidence for crosstalk among different signaling pathways in the coordination of defence reactions enabling adaptation of plants to stressful environments. Thus, it has become increasingly important task for plant biologists to study the mechanisms of action of signaling molecules in order to comprehend their effects and roles in plants.

We invite original research and review articles that will expand our understanding of the significance of signaling molecules in the response of plants to adverse environment.

Dr. Azamat M. Avalbaev
Dr. Oksana Lastochkina
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • plant signaling molecules
  • signal transduction
  • stress tolerance
  • stress signaling
  • abiotic stress
  • biotic stress
  • plant hormones
  • crosstalk
  • reactive oxygen species

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 2143 KiB  
Article
24-Epibrassinolide Reduces Drought-Induced Oxidative Stress by Modulating the Antioxidant System and Respiration in Wheat Seedlings
by Azamat Avalbaev, Vadim Fedyaev, Alsu Lubyanova, Ruslan Yuldashev and Chulpan Allagulova
Plants 2024, 13(2), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13020148 - 5 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1068
Abstract
Brassinosteroids (BRs) represent a group of plant signaling molecules with a steroidal skeleton that play an essential role in plant adaptation to different environmental stresses, including drought. In this work, the effect of pretreatment with 0.4 µM 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) on the oxidant/antioxidant system [...] Read more.
Brassinosteroids (BRs) represent a group of plant signaling molecules with a steroidal skeleton that play an essential role in plant adaptation to different environmental stresses, including drought. In this work, the effect of pretreatment with 0.4 µM 24-epibrassinolide (EBR) on the oxidant/antioxidant system in 4-day-old wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum L.) was studied under moderate drought stress simulated by 12% polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG). It was revealed that EBR-pretreatment had a protective effect on wheat plants as evidenced by the maintenance of their growth rate, as well as the reduction in lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage from plant tissues under drought conditions. This effect was likely due to the ability of EBR to reduce the stress-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and modulate the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Meanwhile, EBR pretreatment enhanced proline accumulation and increased the barrier properties of the cell walls in seedlings by accelerating the lignin deposition. Moreover, the ability of EBR to prevent a drought-caused increase in the intensity of the total dark respiration and the capacity of alternative respiration contributes significantly to the antistress action of this hormone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Signaling Molecules in Plant Stress Tolerance)
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17 pages, 4633 KiB  
Article
Nitric Oxide (NO) Improves Wheat Growth under Dehydration Conditions by Regulating Phytohormone Levels and Induction of the Expression of the TADHN Dehydrin Gene
by Chulpan Allagulova, Azamat Avalbaev, Alsu Lubyanova, Anton Plotnikov, Ruslan Yuldashev and Oksana Lastochkina
Plants 2023, 12(23), 4051; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12234051 - 1 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Nitric oxide (NO) is a universal signaling molecule with important regulatory functions in the plant’s life cycle and adaptation to a wide spectrum of environmental stresses including drought. The effect of pre-sowing seed treatment with the donor of NO sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 200 [...] Read more.
Nitric oxide (NO) is a universal signaling molecule with important regulatory functions in the plant’s life cycle and adaptation to a wide spectrum of environmental stresses including drought. The effect of pre-sowing seed treatment with the donor of NO sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 200 μM) on wheat Triticum aestivum L. plants subjected to dehydration (PEG-8000, 12%) was investigated. SNP pretreatment stimulated germination and seedling growth in normal conditions and protected them under dehydration. These effects were confirmed by percentage of seed germination, changes in fresh and dry weight of 5–6-day-old seedlings, as well as by seedlings’ linear dimensions, visual appearance, and mitotic index of the root apical meristem. Assessment of the transpiration intensity (TI) and relative water content (RWC) showed that SNP pretreatment helped to maintain the water status of seedlings subjected to dehydration stress. The data obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suggested that the positive effects of SNP may be due to its influence on the phytohormonal system. SNP pretreatment induced an increase in the level of indolylacetic acid (IAA) and especially cytokinins (CK), while essential changes in ABA content were not detected. Water deficiency caused a substantial increase in ABA content and a decrease in the levels of CK and IAA. Pre-sowing SNP treatment decreased stress-induced fluctuations in the content of all studied phytohormones. Using reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), we obtained data on the increase in expression of the TADHN dehydrin gene in SNP-pretreated seedlings under normal and, especially, under dehydration conditions. These findings may indicate the participation of dehydrins in NO-induced defense reactions in wheat plants under water stress. Furthermore, exogenous NO had a stabilizing effect on membrane cellular structures, as evidenced by the reduction of electrolyte leakage (EL) levels and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in dehydrated wheat seedlings under the influence of pre-sowing SNP treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Signaling Molecules in Plant Stress Tolerance)
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Review

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25 pages, 5752 KiB  
Review
Appraisal of the Role of Gaseous Signaling Molecules in Thermo-Tolerance Mechanisms in Plants
by Harsha Gautam, Sheen Khan, Nidhi, Adriano Sofo and Nafees A. Khan
Plants 2024, 13(6), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13060791 - 11 Mar 2024
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Abstract
A significant threat to the ongoing rise in temperature caused by global warming. Plants have many stress-resistance mechanisms, which is responsible for maintaining plant homeostasis. Abiotic stresses largely increase gaseous molecules’ synthesis in plants. The study of gaseous signaling molecules has gained attention [...] Read more.
A significant threat to the ongoing rise in temperature caused by global warming. Plants have many stress-resistance mechanisms, which is responsible for maintaining plant homeostasis. Abiotic stresses largely increase gaseous molecules’ synthesis in plants. The study of gaseous signaling molecules has gained attention in recent years. The role of gaseous molecules, such as nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), and ethylene, in plants under temperature high-temperature stress are discussed in the current review. Recent studies revealed the critical function that gaseous molecules play in controlling plant growth and development and their ability to respond to various abiotic stresses. Here, we provide a thorough overview of current advancements that prevent heat stress-related plant damage via gaseous molecules. We also explored and discussed the interaction of gaseous molecules. In addition, we provided an overview of the role played by gaseous molecules in high-temperature stress responses, along with a discussion of the knowledge gaps and how this may affect the development of high-temperature-resistant plant species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Role of Signaling Molecules in Plant Stress Tolerance)
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