Explorations in Postharvest Diseases of Fruits and Vegetables

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Postharvest Biology, Quality, Safety, and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 14894

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Biochemistry and genetics of the Ufa Federal Research Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 450054 Ufa, Russia
Interests: plant-growth promoting bacterium; plant defense; biocontrol; phytoimmunity; signalling systems; phytohormones; recombinant biopesticides; priming; systemic resistance; RNase; RNA-silencing
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Guest Editor
Institute of Biochemistry and Genetics, Ufa Federal Research Centre RAS, 450054 Ufa, Russia
Interests: crop protection; plant-microbe interaction; PGPB; endophytes; plant stress adaptation and tolerance; stress physiology/biochemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Postharvest diseases are one of the most acute problems of agriculture and food industries, significantly limiting production, marketing, and storage of fruits and vegetables leading to significant economic losses worldwide. Pathogens often infect plant organisms and live in their tissues without any typical disease symptoms at growing time and are not always visible at harvest, but may rapidly appear after harvesting and become the major decay factor reducing quality and shelf-life of fruits and vegetables. It is highly desirable to have an approach to the reduction of postharvest food losses that is novel, efficient, environmentally friendly, and bio-safe.

The purpose of this Special Issue on “Explorations in Postharvest Diseases of Fruits and Vegetables” is to present the latest scientific research findings dealing with various aspects of postharvest physiology of fruits and vegetables, tools, methods, and innovations that may be used to cope with postharvest diseases. You are invited to submit to this Special Issue your latest experimental articles and reviews, highlighting various aspects of postharvest physiology of fruits and vegetables, focusing on the main and other related topics.

Prof. Igor V. Maksimov
Dr. Oksana Lastochkina
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • postharvest diseases of fruits and vegetables
  • new strategies to cope with postharvest diseases
  • novel biological control agents
  • postharvest physiology and biochemistry
  • postharvest biocontrol products
  • microbial antagonists
  • plant–microbe interactions
  • stress resistance mechanisms
  • vegetable and fruit quality

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 9965 KiB  
Article
Improving the Biocontrol Potential of Endophytic Bacteria Bacillus subtilis with Salicylic Acid against Phytophthora infestans-Caused Postharvest Potato Tuber Late Blight and Impact on Stored Tubers Quality
by Oksana Lastochkina, Liudmila Pusenkova, Darya Garshina, Cemal Kasnak, Recep Palamutoglu, Irina Shpirnaya, Il’dar Mardanshin and Igor Maksimov
Horticulturae 2022, 8(2), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae8020117 - 27 Jan 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3078
Abstract
Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers are a highly important food crop in many countries due to their nutritional value and health-promoting properties. Postharvest disease caused by Phytophthora infestans leads to the significant decay of stored potatoes. The main objective of this study [...] Read more.
Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers are a highly important food crop in many countries due to their nutritional value and health-promoting properties. Postharvest disease caused by Phytophthora infestans leads to the significant decay of stored potatoes. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the endophytic bacteria, Bacillus subtilis (strain 10–4), or its combination with salicylic acid (SA), on some resistance and quality traits of stored Ph. infestans-infected potato tubers. The experiments were conducted using hydroponically grown potato mini-tubers, infected prior to storage with Ph. infestans, and then coated with B. subtilis, alone and in combination with SA, which were then stored for six months. The results revealed that infection with Ph. infestans significantly increased tuber late blight incidence (up to 90–100%) and oxidative and osmotic damage (i.e., malondialdehyde and proline) in tubers. These phenomena were accompanied by a decrease in starch, reducing sugars (RS), and total dry matter (TDM) contents and an increase in amylase (AMY) activity. Moreover, total glycoalkaloids (GA) (α-solanine, α-chaconine) notably increased in infected tubers, exceeding (by 1.6 times) permissible safe levels (200 mg/kg FW). Treatments with B. subtilis or its combination with SA decreased Ph. infestans-activated tuber late blight incidence (by 30–40%) and reduced oxidative and osmotic damages (i.e., malondialdehyde and proline) and AMY activity in stored, infected tubers. Additionally, these treatments decreased pathogen-activated GA accumulation and increased ascorbic acid in stored tubers. Thus, the results indicated that endophytic bacteria B. subtilis, individually, and especially in combination with SA, have the potential to increase potato postharvest resistance to late blight and improve tuber quality in long-term storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Explorations in Postharvest Diseases of Fruits and Vegetables)
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11 pages, 23432 KiB  
Article
Pathogenic Fungi Associated with Soursop Fruits (Annona muricata L.) during Postharvest in Nayarit, Mexico
by Alejandra Verónica González-Ruíz, Yolotzin Apatzingan Palomino-Hermosillo, Rosendo Balois-Morales, Verónica Alhelí Ochoa-Jiménez, Paloma Patricia Casas-Junco, Graciela Guadalupe López-Guzmán, Guillermo Berumen-Varela and Pedro Ulises Bautista-Rosales
Horticulturae 2021, 7(11), 471; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7110471 - 5 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 5727
Abstract
Nayarit ranks first in national soursop production (Annona muricata L.). However, the soursop fruits are perishable and susceptible to microorganisms attack, reaching up to 60% of the postharvest losses. Due to the previously mentioned points, the objective of the present study was [...] Read more.
Nayarit ranks first in national soursop production (Annona muricata L.). However, the soursop fruits are perishable and susceptible to microorganisms attack, reaching up to 60% of the postharvest losses. Due to the previously mentioned points, the objective of the present study was to isolate, identify, and determine the pathogenicity of fungi related to postharvest diseases in soursop fruits in the main producing areas of Nayarit, Mexico. Several fungi belonging to the genera Fusarium sp., Rhizopus, Lasiodiplodia, Gliocladium, and Colletotrichum were isolated and morphologically identified. Further, bioinformatics sequence analysis of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the rDNA identified that most pathogen species were Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae, and Nectria haematococca, which cause postharvest diseases in soursop fruit, affecting their quality. Lasiodiplodia causes the highest postharvest damage in soursop among the pathogenic species identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Explorations in Postharvest Diseases of Fruits and Vegetables)
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16 pages, 3621 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Potential of the Terrestrial Cyanobacterium Anabaena minutissima for Controlling Botrytis cinerea on Tomato Fruits
by Hillary Righini, Ornella Francioso, Michele Di Foggia, Antera Martel Quintana and Roberta Roberti
Horticulturae 2021, 7(8), 210; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7080210 - 23 Jul 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2376
Abstract
Cyanobacteria are oxygenic phototrophs that have an essential role in soil N2 fixation, fertility, and water retention. Cyanobacteria are also natural sources of bioactive metabolites beneficial to improve plant vigor and potentially active against fungal plant pathogens. Therefore, we studied the antifungal [...] Read more.
Cyanobacteria are oxygenic phototrophs that have an essential role in soil N2 fixation, fertility, and water retention. Cyanobacteria are also natural sources of bioactive metabolites beneficial to improve plant vigor and potentially active against fungal plant pathogens. Therefore, we studied the antifungal activity of water extract (WE) and phycobiliproteins (PBPs) from Anabaena minutissima strain BEA 0300B against the fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea on tomato fruits and in vitro. The water extract and PBPs were characterized by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies. Both water extract (5 mg/mL) and PBPs (ranged from 0.3 to 4.8 mg/mL) reduced disease incidence and disease severity on tomato fruits and mycelium growth and colony forming units in vitro. For mycelium growth, a linear PBP dose-response was found. Tomato fruits were also characterized by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies in order to evaluate structural modifications induced by pathogen and PBP treatment. PBPs preserved cutin and pectin structures by pathogen challenge. In conclusion, A. minutissima can be considered a potential tool for future large-scale experiments for plant disease control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Explorations in Postharvest Diseases of Fruits and Vegetables)
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8 pages, 423 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Orange Essential Oil and Citral after Exposure to UV-C Irradiation to Inhibit Penicillium digitatum in Navel Oranges
by Mohammad M. Rahman, Ron B. H. Wills, Michael C. Bowyer, John B. Golding, Timothy Kirkman and Penta Pristijono
Horticulturae 2020, 6(4), 102; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae6040102 - 14 Dec 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2614
Abstract
The effect of UV-C irradiation on antifungal properties of orange essential oil (EO) against Penicillium digitatum in inoculated Navel oranges was examined. The UV-C irradiation of orange EO resulted in a 20% loss of the major constituent, limonene, and the generation of three [...] Read more.
The effect of UV-C irradiation on antifungal properties of orange essential oil (EO) against Penicillium digitatum in inoculated Navel oranges was examined. The UV-C irradiation of orange EO resulted in a 20% loss of the major constituent, limonene, and the generation of three hydroperoxide oxidation products, (2S,4R)-p-mentha-6,8-diene-2-hydroperoxide,(1S,4R)-p-mentha-2,8-diene-1-hydroperoxide, and (1R,4R)-p-mentha-2,8-diene-1-hydroperoxide. The P. digitatum growth in oranges dipped in non-irradiated orange EO at 1000–4000 µL L−1 was not significantly different to control the fruit. Dipping in UV-C treated orange EO inhibited the growth of P. digitatum with 4000 µL L−1 having the greatest effect. No phytotoxic injury to the rind was observed at any concentration. Citral, as a known antifungal chemical, was included for comparison. The non-irradiated citral (1000 µL L−1) was more effective than irradiated orange EO, but elicited rind phytotoxicity. The irradiated citral was less effective in inhibiting P. digitatum growth with the loss of citral, but not hydroperoxide formation. These results suggest UV-C irradiated orange EO as a potential alternative to synthetic fungicides to inhibit P. digitatum decay. The source of orange EO could be waste flavedo generated by the orange juice processing industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Explorations in Postharvest Diseases of Fruits and Vegetables)
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