Emerging Applications of Metabolomics in Fermented Food

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Metabolomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 986

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Japan
Interests: food metabolomics; fermented food; fermentation; fermentation microorganisms; flavor; food secondary function; sensory evaluation; food ternary function; health-promoting function; nutrition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Interests: metabolomics; bioorganic chemistry; analytical chemistry; photochemistry; food chemistry; natural products

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Research Center for Advanced Analysis, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Japan
Interests: bioorganic chemistry; NMR metabolomics; NMR microscopy; natural product chemistry

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Research Institute of Brewing, Higashihiroshima, Japan
Interests: brewing; Japanese sake; rice-koji

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Metabolomics is a science based on comprehensive metabolite analysis and has recently attracted attention as a method for describing the properties and states of plant, animals and/or microorganisms based on their metabolite profiles. Considering food as a research target, metabolomics is useful for analyzing the performance and function of food itself.

Fermented foods are unique foods that are highly palatable and exhibit complex flavors (secondary functions of foods) and are extremely useful, often having health-promoting functions (tertiary functions of foods). However, the relationships among flavor, tertiary functions, and metabolite profiles of fermented foods are complex and synergistic, and their elucidation is not easy.

For this Special Issue, we welcome submissions presenting metabolomics research results that contribute to the elucidation of the functions of fermented foods.

Specifically, we welcome submissions concerned with the following topics:

1) Metabolomics studies that contribute to the elucidation of the relationship between the flavors of fermented foods and their components;

2) Metabolomics research contributing to the elucidation of health-promoting functions of fermented foods;

3) Research on microorganisms involved in fermented foods;

4) Metabolomics research contributing to the elucidation of the relationship between fermented foods and intestinal microflora.

Prof. Dr. Eiichiro Fukusaki
Prof. Dr. Akira Oikawa
Dr. Yasuyo Sekiyama
Dr. Kazuhiro Iwashita
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food metabolomics
  • fermented food
  • fermentation
  • fermentation microorganisms
  • flavor
  • food secondary function
  • sensory evaluation
  • health-promoting function
  • food ternary function
  • nutrition

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 4025 KiB  
Article
Time-Course Metabolomic Analysis: Production of Betaine Structural Analogs by Fungal Fermentation of Seaweed
by Nao Inoue, Keisuke Tsuge, Teruyoshi Yanagita, Akira Oikawa and Koji Nagao
Metabolites 2024, 14(4), 201; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo14040201 - 3 Apr 2024
Viewed by 652
Abstract
Betaine structural analogs are compounds characterized by the presence of positive and negative charges in a single molecule and have been reported to have physiological properties, such as anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we performed a metabolomic analysis of metabolite composition changes during [...] Read more.
Betaine structural analogs are compounds characterized by the presence of positive and negative charges in a single molecule and have been reported to have physiological properties, such as anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we performed a metabolomic analysis of metabolite composition changes during the fermentation of Neopyropia yezoensis, an edible red alga, with Aspergillus oryzae for 72 h. The results indicated that three specific betaine structural analogs (betaine, stachydrine, and carnitine) exhibited significant changes in production by the end of the 72 h fermentation period. Time-course analysis suggested that betaine was generated from the precursor choline at 12–24 h during the late stage of fungal growth, while stachydrine was generated from the precursor-related compound glutamic acid at 48–72 h during the sporulation stage. However, the contribution of the precursor lysine to the increased production of carnitine during the 12–72 h period was unclear. This study provides useful information on the efficient production of betaine structural analogs by the fungal fermentation of seaweed as well as various other food materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Applications of Metabolomics in Fermented Food)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop