Crop Nutrition Metabolism and Cultivation Physiology

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 4679

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Crop Cultivation and Physiology/Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Modern Production Technology of Grain Crops, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China
Interests: theory and application of maize yield and quality formation; nutrition physiology and adversity physiology of maize

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Crop Cultivation and Physiology/Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Modern Production Technology of Grain Crops, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China
Interests: theory and application of maize yield and quality formation; nutrition physiology and adversity physiology of maize

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Physiology/Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Modern Production Technology of Grain Crops, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China
Interests: multi-omics analysis, key gene discovery and gene function analysis of important traits in maize

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The journal Metabolites will be publishing a Special Issue, titled “Crop Nutrition Metabolism and Cultivation Physiology”. With improvements in germplasm and cultivation techniques, it is of utmost importance to highlight that there is still much potential for increasing crop yield and efficiency. Thus, in this Special Issue, we encourage the submissions of papers on any advancements in the physiology of crop metabolites, growth and development regulations, yield and quality formation, and nutrient absorption and utilization in response to environment and cultivation measures. Crosstalk between disciplines to serve the topic is also encouraged. This Special Issue will cover a wide variety of areas with the aim of contributing to the overall knowledge on the nutrition metabolism and cultivation physiology of crop from several aspects.

Dr. Guanghao Li
Prof. Dr. Dalei Lu
Dr. Jian Guo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • crop
  • nutrition metabolism
  • cultivation physiology
  • yield and quality formation
  • growth and development

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 9717 KiB  
Article
Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals the Underlying Response Mechanism to Salt Stress in Maize Seedling Roots
by Chen Zhang, Bin Chen, Ping Zhang, Qinghui Han, Guangwu Zhao and Fucheng Zhao
Metabolites 2023, 13(11), 1155; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo13111155 - 16 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1063
Abstract
Crop growth and development can be impeded by salt stress, leading to a significant decline in crop yield and quality. This investigation performed a comparative analysis of the physiological responses of two maize inbred lines, namely L318 (CML115) and L323 (GEMS58), under salt-stress [...] Read more.
Crop growth and development can be impeded by salt stress, leading to a significant decline in crop yield and quality. This investigation performed a comparative analysis of the physiological responses of two maize inbred lines, namely L318 (CML115) and L323 (GEMS58), under salt-stress conditions. The results elucidated that CML115 exhibited higher salt tolerance compared with GEMS58. Transcriptome analysis of the root system revealed that DEGs shared by the two inbred lines were significantly enriched in the MAPK signaling pathway–plant and plant hormone signal transduction, which wield an instrumental role in orchestrating the maize response to salt-induced stress. Furthermore, the DEGs’ exclusivity to salt-tolerant genotypes was associated with sugar metabolism pathways, and these unique DEGs may account for the disparities in salt tolerance between the two genotypes. Meanwhile, we investigated the dynamic global transcriptome in the root systems of seedlings at five time points after salt treatment and compared transcriptome data from different genotypes to examine the similarities and differences in salt tolerance mechanisms of different germplasms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crop Nutrition Metabolism and Cultivation Physiology)
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16 pages, 4178 KiB  
Article
Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis Revealing the Genes Related to Sugar Metabolism in Kernels of Sweet Corn
by Bin Chen, Shouli Feng, Junfeng Hou, Ying Zhu, Fei Bao, Hailiang Han, Heping Tan, Guiyue Wang and Fucheng Zhao
Metabolites 2022, 12(12), 1254; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo12121254 - 12 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1324
Abstract
Sugar metabolism influences the quality of sweet corn (Zea mays var. saccharate Sturt) kernels, which is a major goal for maize breeding. In this study, the genome-wide transcriptomes from two supersweet corn cultivars (cv. Xuetian 7401 and Zhetian 11) with a nearly [...] Read more.
Sugar metabolism influences the quality of sweet corn (Zea mays var. saccharate Sturt) kernels, which is a major goal for maize breeding. In this study, the genome-wide transcriptomes from two supersweet corn cultivars (cv. Xuetian 7401 and Zhetian 11) with a nearly two-fold difference in kernel sugar content were carried out to explore the genes related to kernel sugar metabolism. In total, 45,748 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in kernels and 596 DEGs in leaves were identified. PsbS, photosynthetic system II subunit S, showed two isoforms with different expression levels in leaf tissue between two cultivars, indicating that this gene might influence sugar accumulation in the kernel. On the other hand, hexokinases and beta-glucosidase genes involved in glycolysis, starch and sucrose metabolism were found in developing kernels with a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of developing kernels, which might contribute to the overaccumulation of water-soluble polysaccharides and an increase in the sweetness in the kernels of Xuetian 7401. These results indicated that kernel sugar accumulation in sweet corn might be influenced by both photosynthesis efficiency and the sugar metabolism rate. Our study supplied a new insight for breeding new cultivars with high sugar content and laid the foundation for exploring the regulatory mechanisms of kernel sugar content in corn. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crop Nutrition Metabolism and Cultivation Physiology)
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15 pages, 3592 KiB  
Article
Optimized Fertilization Practices Improved Rhizosphere Soil Chemical and Bacterial Properties and Fresh Waxy Maize Yield
by Guanghao Li, Wei Li, Shibo Zhang, Weiping Lu and Dalei Lu
Metabolites 2022, 12(10), 935; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo12100935 - 01 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1312
Abstract
The interactive mechanism of root and soil for achieving high and stable yield of maize is still unclear. Synchronizing soil nutrient supply with crop requirements by optimizing fertilization is effective cultivation measures to improve maize yield. In this study, field trials were conducted [...] Read more.
The interactive mechanism of root and soil for achieving high and stable yield of maize is still unclear. Synchronizing soil nutrient supply with crop requirements by optimizing fertilization is effective cultivation measures to improve maize yield. In this study, field trials were conducted to investigate the dynamic changes of optimized fertilization on chemical and bacterial properties in rhizosphere soil, root physiological properties, and yield of fresh waxy maize. Optimized fertilization practices (one-time application of new compound fertilizer at sowing, three-, and six-leaf stages, denoted as F1, F2, and F3), local traditional fertilization (F4), and no fertilization (F0) were set up in 2-year field experiments at two sites. F3 increased the fresh ear (10.2%) and grain (9.4%) yields relative to F4. Optimized fertilization practices increased the abundance and diversity of rhizosphere soil bacterial communities at R3. The enzymatic activities of oxidoreductase, hydrolase, transferase, and lyase in rhizosphere soil under F3 were higher than those in other treatments at R1 and R3. F3 increased the contents of organic matter and total N in rhizosphere soil, as well as the root activities. These findings provide physiological information from underground on optimized fertilization types and stages in enhancing the yield of fresh waxy maize. One-time application of new compound fertilizer at six-leaf stage increased the abundance and diversity of bacterial, organic matter and total N content in rhizosphere soil, enhanced root activity at post-silking stage, and eventually improved yield of fresh waxy maize in southern China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crop Nutrition Metabolism and Cultivation Physiology)
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