Landscape Based Land Solutions and Big Data

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 9509

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

One of the most important issues in the development process of a city is creating a visually pleasing environment, and residents are increasingly demanding a high-quality landscape/urbanscape as well. Even though there have been a series of micro-perspective research works in city planning, civil engineering, and architecture, the necessity of research on satisfying the human sensibility land studies reflect is rising, providing a great effect.

Meanwhile, in the Landscape is defined as the features of a local environment created in residents’ daily lives and can be natural or artificial, whereas the dictionary definition states that it is the natural or cultural scenery characterizing the views above the surface.

Although the definition may vary between researchers depending on which area(s) they are placing academic significances, this Special Issue (SI) defines landscape as “The scenes or surrounding environment of space where people are living, including a physical environment embodying the structures, outdoor signboards, atmosphere, and surrounding environment.

Meanwhile, big data technology helps us to have an overview of the complex worldly affairs by deriving meaningful value from a huge dataset that was previously seemingly impossible to analyze, consisting of either structured or unstructured data, or both.

Thus, in this SI, we aim to start a discussion about a basic convergent study that would contribute to humanity by respecting human beings and their lives, while aiding and serving neglected or isolated people. For this purpose, this SI is open to receiving a variety of meaningful and valuable manuscripts concerning the purpose of solving this healthcare issue with electronic solutions. Participants may write about one of the subjects listed below, but need not be limited to them.

> Land solutions to artificial intelligence and big data;

> Land solutions respecting human beings and their lives;

> Means of aiding and serving neglected people such as the disabled or elderly;

> Landscape/urbanscape mathematical theories that deeply affect science and industry;

> Landscape/urbanscape intelligent media techniques and services for land systems;

> A public landscape/urbanscape system for future systems.

Prof. Dr. Jun-Ho Huh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • big data
  • data science
  • land solution
  • landscape
  • urbanscape
  • future systems

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 5641 KiB  
Article
A Novel Community Detection Method of Social Networks for the Well-Being of Urban Public Spaces
by Yixuan Yang, Sony Peng, Doo-Soon Park, Fei Hao and Hyejung Lee
Land 2022, 11(5), 716; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11050716 - 10 May 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1637
Abstract
A third place (public social space) has been proven to be a gathering place for communities of friends on social networks (social media). The regulars at places of worship, cafes, parks, and entertainment can also possibly be friends with those who follow each [...] Read more.
A third place (public social space) has been proven to be a gathering place for communities of friends on social networks (social media). The regulars at places of worship, cafes, parks, and entertainment can also possibly be friends with those who follow each other on social media, with other non-regulars being social network friends of one of the regulars. Therefore, detecting and analyzing user-friendly communities on social networks can provide references for the layout and construction of urban public spaces. In this article, we focus on proposing a method for detecting communities of signed social networks and mining γ-Quasi-Cliques for closely related users within them. We fully consider the relationship between friends and enemies of objects in signed networks, consider the mutual influence between friends or enemies, and propose a novel method to recompute the weighted edges between nodes and mining γ-Quasi-Cliques. In our experiment, with a variety of thresholds given, we conducted multiple sets of tests via real-life social network datasets, compared various reweighted datasets, and detected maximal balanced γ-Quasi-Cliques to determine the optimal parameters of our method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Based Land Solutions and Big Data)
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17 pages, 3689 KiB  
Article
System Design for Detecting Real Estate Speculation Abusing Inside Information: For the Fair Reallocation of Land
by Yeon-Jin Sim, Jeongmin Kim, Jaehyeon Choi and Jun-Ho Huh
Land 2022, 11(4), 565; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11040565 - 11 Apr 2022
Viewed by 1752
Abstract
In March 2021, a case of speculation that abused private internal information came to light, which involved a group of public officials from the Korea Land and Housing Corporation (LH), and has since been labeled the ‘LH Scandal’. In this scandal, land was [...] Read more.
In March 2021, a case of speculation that abused private internal information came to light, which involved a group of public officials from the Korea Land and Housing Corporation (LH), and has since been labeled the ‘LH Scandal’. In this scandal, land was misappropriated as a means of creating fraudulent values, instead of returning it to marginalized people in real need of residential space. As a result of this, preventive measures for similar cases have become warranted. Consequently, related laws have been passed, but this is only expected to show its effect as a follow-up response, therefore requiring a preemptive response plan. In this paper, we will propose a conceptual framework that can detect speculation that abuses private internal information, enabling a preemptive response, utilizing outlier detection and Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) methods. The system is designed to create a database (DB) with private inside real estate information, which is linked to another DB with a list of outlier-detected areas that can potentially indicate speculation, and then the system confirms any speculation by comparing the two DBs accordingly. Once a speculation case is confirmed, the system automatically reports the case to the investigative agency. By using this system, we expect to detect hidden speculation cases already committed, as well as speculation cases in real-time. Ultimately, we hope to protect the original purpose of redevelopment and the construction of new towns (housing/retail mixed-use zones), redistributing available land on behalf of marginalized people, who are lacking in residential space, by raising the utility of land. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Based Land Solutions and Big Data)
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21 pages, 14697 KiB  
Article
Use of Vegetation to Classify Urban Landscape Types: Application in a Mediterranean Coastal Area
by Hugo Castro Noblejas, José María Orellana-Macías and Matías Francisco Mérida Rodríguez
Land 2022, 11(2), 228; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11020228 - 03 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1941
Abstract
The objectives of this paper are (a) to incorporate vegetation cover into quantitative techniques for identifying and classifying urban landscape types, (b) to implement a methodology to analyse the urban landscape units of three zones in the Mediterranean coastal area and (c) to [...] Read more.
The objectives of this paper are (a) to incorporate vegetation cover into quantitative techniques for identifying and classifying urban landscape types, (b) to implement a methodology to analyse the urban landscape units of three zones in the Mediterranean coastal area and (c) to design a methodology that could be extrapolated to other urban spaces with a similar type and spatial scale. To achieve the objectives, the urban landscape units are characterized in three Mediterranean coastal municipalities in the south of Spain, in the province of Málaga: Benalmádena, Marbella and Manilva. The characterization is based on some of the most representative variables of the urban morphology, such as construction density, road density and building height, also incorporating the presence of vegetation cover, both arboreal and herbaceous and shrub. Data were obtained from the Spanish Cadastral (urban morphology variables) and through remote sensing techniques (vegetation), spatial analysis tools and multivariate analysis were implemented to obtain the characterization and spatial delimitation of the urban typologies. As a result, six clusters are recognized with predominant urban landscape typologies. The proposed procedure is a useful tool to segment the city following landscape criteria, as well as to assess the changes experienced in urban spaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Based Land Solutions and Big Data)
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27 pages, 1917 KiB  
Article
Comparative Study on Flora Characteristics and Species Diversity on Dam Slopes for Sustainable Ecological Management: Cases of Eight Dams in Korea
by Gwon-Soo Bahn, Sung-Yeol Kim and Jaeyong Choi
Land 2021, 10(12), 1403; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10121403 - 19 Dec 2021
Viewed by 2595
Abstract
Dams are gray infrastructure, providing various benefits such as flood control, water supply, and power generation. In order to create the next generation of infrastructure that explores how nature can act as infrastructure to meet development and ecological sustainability, artificial plantings have been [...] Read more.
Dams are gray infrastructure, providing various benefits such as flood control, water supply, and power generation. In order to create the next generation of infrastructure that explores how nature can act as infrastructure to meet development and ecological sustainability, artificial plantings have been attempted on dam slopes in Korea since 2000. As the planted trees are now stabilized to form a forest, it is time to study the floral characteristics and functions for effective ecological management and the safety of the dams. In this study, we investigated and analyzed flora in the slopes of eight dams in Korea. The comparative study of the whole flora in both the planted zones of the slopes of dams and left and right forests of dams revealed that the number of plant species was higher in the planted zones than in the left and right forests of the same size area. The plant family containing the greatest number of species in the slopes was Asteraceae, followed by Poaceae, Fabaceae, and Rosaceae. Currently, the community structures and families in the slopes of dams exhibit the characteristics of habitats in the initial stage of vegetation succession. Our investigation of planted species and immigration species in the slopes revealed that the latter comprised 89.9%. An average of 34.4% of species were interacting with the dam slope and the left and right forests. The species diversity index on dam slopes showed a tendency to be higher as the number of planted species increased and the period time increased. Average growth heights of planted trees were identified as 0.5–1.6 m for the shrubs layer, 3.5–4.5 m for the small trees layer, and 6.0–7.2 m for the trees layer. The heights of major trees, including Pinus densiflora, Quercus spp., Prunus sargentii, Styrax japonicus, and Cornus controversa, were similar to or higher than those of their counterparts in natural forests. As a result, dam slopes were similar to natural forests, having potential as habitats for various flora. To harmoniously maintain the ecological health and safety of water resource facilities of the slopes of dams, however, it is necessary to conduct periodic and various investigations on changes of the flora and growth of trees, and actively manage them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Based Land Solutions and Big Data)
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