Orchard Management under Climate Change

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Fruit Production Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2024 | Viewed by 8186

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Agriculture, Department of Horticulture. São Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu 18610-307, SP, Brazil
Interests: fruit crop management; fruit physiology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Universidade de São Paulo, Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz, Avenida Pádua Dias, nº 11, P.O. Box 9, Piracicaba 13418-900, SP, Brazil
Interests: crop management; cultivars evaluation; propagation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Different fruit crops around the world drive the economies of many countries, supplying the domestic market and paving the way for competitive international trade. In addition to the health benefits of regularly consuming various fruits, the cultivation of these species revitalises and energises entire communities, regions or countries. New fruit-growing frontiers have been developed in recent years. At the same time, climate changes have caused the deterioration of traditionally cultivated areas. Using physiological principles to guide precision orchard management will greatly improve yields, and consequently, quality attributes, ensuring that every fruit grown is of a high quality. In this scenario, there is a need for major environmental and technical challenges in orchard management. This Special Issue, entitled "Orchard Management under Climate Change", which aims to disseminate recent research findings in order to continue moving together towards more productive and sustainable fruit farming. Contributions on the following topics are welcome: the increase in productive crop cultivars; advanced soil use and management techniques; mechanization process; training system; cultural practices such as irrigation, fertilization, canopy density, thinning, pesticide application technology, fruit harvesting descriptors and methods; and other innovations that improve the profitability and sustainability of fruit crops.

Prof. Dr. Sarita Leonel
Dr. Sergio Ruffo Roberto
Dr. Simone Rodrigues da Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cultural practices
  • environment–physiology–plant interactions
  • soil use and management

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 690 KiB  
Article
Hop Tropicalization: Chemical Compositions of Varieties Grown under Organic and Conventional Systems in Subtropical Conditions
by Gabriel Cássia Fortuna, Caio Scardini Neves, Olivia Pak Campos, Jordany Aparecida Oliveira Gomes, Júlio César Rodrigues Lopes Silva, Amauri Alves Souza, Cristiano Soleo de Funari, Márcia Ortiz Mayo Marques and Filipe Pereira Giardini Bonfim
Horticulturae 2023, 9(8), 855; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9080855 - 27 Jul 2023
Viewed by 839
Abstract
The interest in the production of hops in Brazil, motivated by the third position in the world ranking of beer producers and the growth of the craft brewery business, justifies the intensification of studies into its adaptation to local growing conditions. Due to [...] Read more.
The interest in the production of hops in Brazil, motivated by the third position in the world ranking of beer producers and the growth of the craft brewery business, justifies the intensification of studies into its adaptation to local growing conditions. Due to the high internal demand, the aim of this study was to evaluate the phytochemical profiles of hop varieties grown in subtropical conditions under different cropping systems. Studies that promote the expansion of cultivation areas in distinct climate conditions and ensure quality are very important. A randomized block design was adopted with a 2 × 5 subdivided plot. The main factor was the cropping system (organic and conventional), and the secondary factor was the hop variety (Columbus, Chinook, Nugget, Cascade and Hallertau Mittelfrüeh), with four blocks and four plants per plot. The quality parameters monitored in this work were the contents of alpha and beta acids, and xanthohumol in the inflorescences of hops, as well as the relative composition of their essential oils. The variations in the chemical profiles of essential oils showed differences between some varieties, and the different compositions and levels resulting from the two cropping systems show that management and cultural practices can influence the aromatic characteristics of hops; in total, 23 compounds were found. The terpene fraction represented 79.67% of the oil in Hallertau and 93.63% in Cascade, with myrcene being the main compound. The levels of bitter acids and xanthohumol did not differ statistically as a function of the treatments. This study contributes the first records of the chemical profiles of hops grown in subtropical conditions in Brazil, in general, the Nugget variety had the highest qualitative potential Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orchard Management under Climate Change)
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13 pages, 986 KiB  
Article
Photosynthesis, Biochemical and Yield Performance of Grapevine Hybrids in Two Rootstock and Trellis Height
by Francisco José Domingues Neto, Adilson Pimentel Junior, Lenon Romano Modesto, Mara Fernandes Moura, Fernando Ferrari Putti, Carmen Silvia Fernandes Boaro, Elizabeth Orika Ono, João Domingos Rodrigues and Marco Antonio Tecchio
Horticulturae 2023, 9(5), 596; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9050596 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1369
Abstract
The interaction between variety, rootstock, and trellis height is important for grapevine management, mainly for producing new varieties of grapes for juice and wine in new wine-growing regions with high production potential. Then, this study aimed to evaluate the rootstocks and trellis height [...] Read more.
The interaction between variety, rootstock, and trellis height is important for grapevine management, mainly for producing new varieties of grapes for juice and wine in new wine-growing regions with high production potential. Then, this study aimed to evaluate the rootstocks and trellis height influence on photosynthesis, biochemical, and yield performance for grapevine hybrids. The experiment was carried out in a randomized block design using two factors, rootstocks (‘IAC 766’ and ‘106-8 Mgt’) and trellis height (until 1.6 and 2.0 m), evaluated for two grapevine hybrids (IAC 138-22 ‘Maximo’ and ‘BRS Violeta’). During grapevine flowering, it was evaluated photosynthesis and biochemical performance, for this, the gaseous exchanges were measured using the open system photosynthesis equipment with a CO2 analyzer and water vapor by infrared radiation, being net assimilation rate of CO2, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, internal CO2 concentration, water use efficiency, carboxylation efficiency (Rubisco), and the flux density of photosynthetically active photons. At the stages of grapevine flowering and ripening berries were evaluated the antioxidant enzymes (peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT)), total soluble proteins, chlorophylls, and SPAD. The interaction between rootstock and trellis heigh influenced varieties’ photosynthesis, biochemical, and yield performance. In conclusion under subtropical conditions, better photosynthesis, biochemical, and yield performance were observed when both cultivars were grafted on the ‘IAC 766’ rootstock. The ‘IAC 138-22 Maximo’ was trained until 2.0 and grafted on the ‘IAC 766’ rootstock, increasing grape production and photosynthesis efficiency. In addition, this variety was more productive than ‘BRS Violeta’. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orchard Management under Climate Change)
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18 pages, 2206 KiB  
Article
Profile of Bioactive Compounds in Orange Juice Related to the Combination of Different Scion/Rootstocks, Packaging and Storage
by Rafaelly Calsavara Martins, Sarita Leonel, Jackson Mirellys Azevedo Souza, Giuseppina Pace Pereira Lima, Magali Leonel, Fernando Ferrari Putti, Gean Charles Monteiro, Patrícia Graosque Ülguim Züge, Gabriel Maluf Napoleão, Ricardo Figueira and Jaime Duarte Filho
Horticulturae 2023, 9(3), 347; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9030347 - 6 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1757
Abstract
Citrus scion/rootstock combinations alter the concentration of bioactive compounds in orange juice. The shelf life of freshly squeezed juice can be maximized through packaging and storage. The profiles of ascorbic (AA), dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA), and phenolic compounds were analyzed in juices of four [...] Read more.
Citrus scion/rootstock combinations alter the concentration of bioactive compounds in orange juice. The shelf life of freshly squeezed juice can be maximized through packaging and storage. The profiles of ascorbic (AA), dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA), and phenolic compounds were analyzed in juices of four sweet orange scions, Sanguínea de Mombuca (SM), Rubi (R), Lue Gin Gong (LGG), and Valência Delta Seedless (VDS), grafted onto ‘Rangpur’ lime (RL) and ‘Swingle’ citrumelo (SC) rootstocks. The juices obtained from the combination of the ‘Rubi’ orange in both rootstocks stood out by their higher concentration of ascorbic acid (AA) and dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA). Overall, all SC-grafted scions showed higher AA and DHAA and some phenolic compound concentrations. In all combinations, phenolic compounds showed the highest concentrations in the juices at the time of fruit extraction and decreased during storage. Dark packaging provided higher bioactive compounds in juices stored for longer periods. These findings can contribute to the diversification of scion/rootstock cultivars in order to increase the variety of orchards by choosing the best combinations for pasteurized orange juice with higher nutritional value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orchard Management under Climate Change)
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Review

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23 pages, 1554 KiB  
Review
Understanding the Invasion, Ecological Adaptations, and Management Strategies of Bactrocera dorsalis in China: A Review
by Saleem Jaffar, Syed Arif Hussain Rizvi and Yongyue Lu
Horticulturae 2023, 9(9), 1004; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9091004 - 5 Sep 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3076
Abstract
Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel, 1912) (Diptera: Tephritidae), commonly known as the oriental fruit fly, is a highly destructive pest that globally infests fruits and vegetables, resulting in significant annual economic losses. Initially detected in Taiwan Island, it has rapidly expanded its distribution range to [...] Read more.
Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel, 1912) (Diptera: Tephritidae), commonly known as the oriental fruit fly, is a highly destructive pest that globally infests fruits and vegetables, resulting in significant annual economic losses. Initially detected in Taiwan Island, it has rapidly expanded its distribution range to various regions in mainland China since the 1980s, with a continuous northward spread. To mitigate the damage caused by this pest, extensive efforts have been undertaken to comprehend its ecological and physiological adaptations and develop management strategies. This review article provides an overview of the invasion history of B. dorsalis in China, its ecological and physiological mechanisms facilitating its invasion, and the progress made in understanding its major biological characteristics. Moreover, the key approaches for managing B. dorsalis that have been or are likely to be implemented in China are presented, including quarantine measures, monitoring procedures, physical controls, biological controls, the sterile insect technique, RNA interference, and CRISPR-Cas-9. Finally, some suggestions for future research directions are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orchard Management under Climate Change)
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