Advances in Cellulose-Based Hydrogels (3rd Edition)

A special issue of Gels (ISSN 2310-2861). This special issue belongs to the section "Gel Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 2029

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture (DICAr), Università degli Studi di Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: hydrogels; gels; natural polymers; biopolymers; biomaterials; responsive polymers; smart polymers; cellulose; cellulose derivatives; materials characterization; rheology; scaffold; biomedical; tissue engineering; regenerative medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Chemistry, Materials and Chemical Engineering “G. Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, 20131 Milano, Italy
Interests: cellulose nanofibers; biopolymers; aerogels; advanced cellulose-based systems; applied chemistry
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Engineering for Innovation, University of Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce, Italy
Interests: biomaterials; scaffold; tissue engineering; material characterization; viscoelasticity; hydrogels; green chemistry; natural polymers
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cellulose is the most abundant natural biopolymer on Earth. With an estimated annual production of ~1.5 × 1012 tons globally and the possibility of its extraction even from waste sources, it is considered an almost inexhaustible source of raw material capable of making up for the growing demand for environmentally friendly and biocompatible products.

Within this framework, cellulose-based hydrogels usually combine hydrophilicity, biodegradability, non-toxicity, and biocompatibility together with low costs and massive availability, which make them extremely attractive in both academic and industrial fields. Potential application fields include biomedical engineering (e.g., tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, drug/cell delivery systems, 3D printing and bioprinting), progress in smart systems (e.g., sensors, actuators, soft robotics) and stimuli-responsive systems (e.g., pH- or thermo-responsive hydrogels), the agricultural sector (e.g., soil conditioning, nutrient carriers, water reservoirs), and water purification.

This Special Issue is aimed at collecting the recent progress in cellulose-based hydrogels, including gels prepared from natural cellulose and its derivatives, cellulose graft co-polymers, and composite gels based on cellulose. We encourage submissions covering key aspects of cellulose-based hydrogels, including design, characterization, as well as application-focused research.

As Guest Editors, we would kindly invite you to contribute a research paper or a review on any topic related to this thread.

Dr. Lorenzo Bonetti
Dr. Laura Riva
Dr. Christian Demitri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Gels is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cellulose
  • nanocellulose
  • cellulose derivatives
  • cellulose-based composites
  • hydrogels
  • design
  • characterization
  • applications

Related Special Issues

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 7917 KiB  
Article
Upcycling Low-Quality Cotton Fibers into Mulch Gel Films in a Fast Closed Carbon Cycle
by Shaida S. Rumi, Sumedha Liyanage, Zhen Zhang and Noureddine Abidi
Gels 2024, 10(4), 218; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels10040218 - 23 Mar 2024
Viewed by 914
Abstract
Low-quality cotton fibers, often overlooked as low-value materials, constitute a marginalized waste stream in the cotton industry. This study endeavored to repurpose these fibers into mulch gel films, specifically exploring their efficacy in covering moisture-controlled soil beds. Through a meticulously designed series of [...] Read more.
Low-quality cotton fibers, often overlooked as low-value materials, constitute a marginalized waste stream in the cotton industry. This study endeavored to repurpose these fibers into mulch gel films, specifically exploring their efficacy in covering moisture-controlled soil beds. Through a meticulously designed series of processing methods, cellulose/glycerol film was successfully fabricated by regenerating cellulose hydrogels in N,N-dimethylacetamide/lithium chloride solutions, followed by plasticization in glycerol/water solutions and hot pressing. The film was then employed to cover soil beds for a duration of up to 252 days, followed by soil burial assessments. Despite expectations of degradation, the film maintained structural integrity throughout the soil covering period but underwent complete biodegradation after 80 days of soil burial, thereby completing a closed carbon cycle. Intriguingly, both tensile strength and modulus exhibited no diminishment but instead increased after soil covering, contrary to expectations given the usual role of degradation. Mechanistic insights revealed that the removal of glycerol contributed to the mechanical enhancement, while microbial activity predominately decomposed the amorphous regions in soil covering and targeted the crystalline portions in soil burial, elucidating the main biodegradation mechanisms. In summary, this study presents, for the first time, the potential of upcycling low-quality cotton fibers into high-value mulch gel films for agricultural practices within a closed carbon cycle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cellulose-Based Hydrogels (3rd Edition))
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

15 pages, 3665 KiB  
Article
Tailoring Hydrogel Structures: Investigating the Effects of Multistep Cellulose Defibrillation on Polyvinyl Alcohol Composites
by Gabriel Goetten de Lima, Bruno Bernardi Aggio, Alessandra Cristina Pedro, Tielidy A. de M. de Lima and Washington Luiz Esteves Magalhães
Gels 2024, 10(3), 212; https://doi.org/10.3390/gels10030212 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 842
Abstract
Defibrillating cellulose through various grinding steps and incorporating it into hydrogels introduces unique properties that warrant thorough exploration. This study investigates cellulose defibrillation at different steps (15–120) using an ultra-fine friction grinder, blended with high-molecular-weight polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and crosslinked via freeze–thawing. A [...] Read more.
Defibrillating cellulose through various grinding steps and incorporating it into hydrogels introduces unique properties that warrant thorough exploration. This study investigates cellulose defibrillation at different steps (15–120) using an ultra-fine friction grinder, blended with high-molecular-weight polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and crosslinked via freeze–thawing. A critical discovery is the influence of defibrillation on the hydrogel structure, as evidenced by reduced crystallinity, thermal degradation, and the enhanced swelling of PVA chains. Despite an increased elastic modulus of up to 120 steps, the synthesized material maintains remarkable strength under hydrated conditions, holding significant promise in biomaterial applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Cellulose-Based Hydrogels (3rd Edition))
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop