Safety and Quality in Fermented Beverages

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 713

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Chemistry Research Centre-Vila Real (CQ-VR), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: food science and technology; winemaking; alcoholic beverages; grapes; wine; wine stability; wine quality; wine aging; wine safety; fining; phenolic compounds; proteins
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Chemistry Research Centre-Vila Real, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: food chemistry; wine quality and safety; Maillard reaction; melanoidins; nutraceuticals including gluten detoxification for celiac patients; phenolic compounds
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chemistry Research Centre-Vila Real (CQ-VR), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: food chemistry; oenology; analytical methods; winemaking; wine stability; phenolic compounds; aroma compounds; sensory analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Chemistry Research Centre-Vila Real (CQ-VR), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: genetics; proteomics; biotechnology; therapeutics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The production of fermented beverages poses its own challenges, and ensuring both the safety and quality of these beverages is paramount to public health. The fermentation process relies on microbial activity, often involving bacteria and yeast. However, not all microorganisms are beneficial or harmless. Ensuring the safety of fermented beverages involves controlling the presence and growth of pathogens that can cause spoilage. Beyond safety, the quality of a fermented beverage is essential for its commercial success. Factors such as flavor, aroma, and appearance all contribute to the overall quality. Quality control measures can include sensory analysis, chemical analysis, and ensuring consistency in production processes. Different fermented beverages require distinct fermentation techniques. Understanding the specific requirements of each beverage is crucial for producing a safe and high-quality product. Techniques can range from using specific yeast strains to controlling temperature and pH levels during fermentation. Compliance with local and international regulations is crucial for ensuring the safety and quality of fermented beverages. These regulations may cover aspects such as labeling, production practices, and limits for certain substances (like sulfites, biogenic amines, and mycotoxins) or on alcohol content. Safety and quality are key considerations in the production and consumption of fermented beverages. By understanding the microbial processes involved, implementing quality control measures, complying with regulations, and staying informed about emerging trends, producers can create products that are not only safe but also enjoyable and commercially successful.

Main Topics:

  • Fermented beverages
  • Fermented beverage microbiology
  • Fermented beverage safety
  • Fermented beverage quality
  • The microbial spoilage of fermented beverages
  • The role of LAB within fermented beverage safety and quality
  • Emerging trends in fermented beverages
  • Fermented beverage contaminations
  • The mitigation of fermented beverage contaminations
  • Biogenic amines
  • Ethyl carbamate
  • Volatile phenols
  • Off-flavors
  • Brett Character” and mousy taint
  • Oxidized taints from acetaldehyde
  • The production of mycotoxins

Dr. Fernanda Cosme
Dr. Fernando M. Nunes
Dr. Luís Filipe-Ribeiro
Dr. Miguel Ribeiro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microbial spoilage
  • safety
  • quality
  • contaminants
  • yeasts
  • fungal
  • lactic acid bacterial
  • biogenic amines
  • ethyl carbamate
  • volatile phenols

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 318 KiB  
Article
Comparative Evaluation of Health-Promoting Compounds, Physicochemical and Microbiological Properties of Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] Based Mahewu Produced by Different Traditional Brewers in Thohoyandou, South Africa
by Mpho Edward Mashau, Dakalo Muluvhu and Shonisani Eugenia Ramashia
Fermentation 2024, 10(5), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation10050236 - 28 Apr 2024
Viewed by 563
Abstract
Sorghum (Sorghum bicolour (L.) Moench) is an emerging reliable alternative for mahewu production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the health-promoting compounds, physicochemical and microbiological properties of sorghum-based mahewu produced by different traditional brewers in Thohoyandou, South Africa. A total of [...] Read more.
Sorghum (Sorghum bicolour (L.) Moench) is an emerging reliable alternative for mahewu production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the health-promoting compounds, physicochemical and microbiological properties of sorghum-based mahewu produced by different traditional brewers in Thohoyandou, South Africa. A total of 18 mahewu samples produced by six traditional brewers (TB1–TB6) were collected and compared for antioxidant, physicochemical, and microbiological properties. Commercial sorghum mahewu was used as a control sample. The total phenolic content of the mahewu samples varied from 27.37 to 65.89 GAE /g, with commercial mahewu having a lower value. The flavonoid content ranged from 0.18 to 0.30 GAE/g, and commercial mahewu had a higher value. The DPPH scavenging activity and FRAP of mahewu samples ranged from 44.62% to 49% and 1.47 to 2.36 mg GAE/g, respectively. Commercial mahewu had a higher DPPH value but a lower FRAP value. The pH of mahewu varied significantly, ranging from 3.38 to 3.66, but was within the acceptable range. The °Brix values varied from 9.68 to 17.49, with traditional mahewu samples having higher values than commercial mahewu. Total titratable acidity ranged from 0.63 to 1.17%. The viscosity ranged from 444.33 to 1297.00 cP, with commercial mahewu having a higher value. There was a significant variation in the color of the mahewu samples with respect to L*, a*, b*, C, Hue, and ΔΕ. The growth of yeasts and molds varied from 7.95 log10 to 8.99 log10 (cfu/mL) in traditional mahewu samples, and coliforms ranged from 3.68 to 5.96 log10 (cfu/mL) and were not isolated in commercial mahewu. The total plate count ranged from 7.914 to 8.978 log10 (cfu/mL). The microbiological results show that traditional brewers are meeting the legal limit and can increase their products for commercialization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety and Quality in Fermented Beverages)
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