Mental Health and Well-Being on School Campus in the Post-pandemic Era

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Education and Psychology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2023) | Viewed by 7453

Special Issue Editors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic caused global panic and anxiety, and many restrictive measures were put in place to effectively control the pandemic, which also led to drastic changes in the operation of the school campus system. These changes have also brought a high level of attention to the mental health and well-being of school campus members. As the world moves into the post-pandemic era at the end of 2021, education systems around the world are struggling to recover, but there are still many uncertainties on campuses, making it important to explore how staff and students can have and maintain good mental health and well-being. Therefore, this Research Topic encourages the submission of empirical and synthesis papers that cover, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  1. Approaches to promoting mental health and well-being on campus.
  2. Exploring the factors affecting mental health and well-being on campus.
  3. Exploring the addictive factors of students' behavior in the post-pandemic era.
  4. Changes in the mental health and well-being of campus members during different periods of the pandemic.
  5. The impact of positive psychology on campuses in the post-pandemic era.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in IJERPH or Joint Special Issue in Healthcare.

Dr. Jian-Hong Ye
Prof. Dr. Mei-Yen Chen
Prof. Dr. Yung-Wei Hao
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • behavioral addiction
  • emotion
  • mental health
  • positive psychology
  • post-pandemic era
  • school
  • well-being

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 233 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Mitigating Circumstances Procedures: Student Satisfaction, Wellbeing and Structural Compassion on the Campus
by Neil Armstrong and Nicola C. Byrom
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(12), 1230; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13121230 - 12 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1647
Abstract
For several decades, universities have sought to promote better mental health amongst students. For example, universities now have formal institutional arrangements to postpone deadlines for students where there are mitigating circumstances, such as ill health. Such provisions might be understood as praiseworthy cases [...] Read more.
For several decades, universities have sought to promote better mental health amongst students. For example, universities now have formal institutional arrangements to postpone deadlines for students where there are mitigating circumstances, such as ill health. Such provisions might be understood as praiseworthy cases of institutional compassion. But, empirical research is needed to investigate how these measures play out in practice. This paper draws on ethnographic research in several UK universities to explore the experiences of staff responsible for the enactment of mitigating circumstance provisions. We find staff members sympathetic to the aims of the measures but also sceptical, and in some cases angry, because they find that the provisions have unwanted and undesirable effects. This paper uses the wider social science literature on bureaucracy to consider why this might be the case and raises questions about the capacity of institutions to enact ethical ideals. Full article
15 pages, 955 KiB  
Article
How School-Based Wellbeing Interventions, Socioeconomic Status, and Gender Impact Anxiety Development in Middle Childhood
by Tracy O’Halloran, Jennifer Symonds, Linda L. Bhreathnach, Seaneen Sloan, Dympna Devine, Gabriela Martinez Sainz and Aisling Davies
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(10), 994; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13100994 - 28 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1008
Abstract
The current study examined whether delivering wellbeing interventions in schools impacted anxiety development in middle childhood. Schools have an important role to play in addressing children’s anxiety through daily practice in classrooms and by implementing specialist wellbeing interventions that support children’s coping. A [...] Read more.
The current study examined whether delivering wellbeing interventions in schools impacted anxiety development in middle childhood. Schools have an important role to play in addressing children’s anxiety through daily practice in classrooms and by implementing specialist wellbeing interventions that support children’s coping. A nationally representative sample of Irish primary school children (N = 2313; 48.9% male) were surveyed when they were in second class (M age 8.09 years, SD = 0.39) and fourth class (M age 9.96 years, SD = 0.40) of primary school. Teachers reported on wellbeing interventions in schools. Key findings from moderation analyses suggest that family affluence and being female predicted a greater increase in anxiety development and that wellbeing interventions interacted with family affluence to reduce anxiety development for more affluent children. These findings can be used to strengthen the design and implementation of wellbeing interventions for a more efficacious approach to minimising children’s anxiety development. Full article
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18 pages, 1484 KiB  
Article
“Following the Breath”: A Trauma-Informed Intervention for Educator Wellness in Rural Montana
by Lauren Davis, Alexandra Aylward, Brandon G. Scott and Jonathan Jacobs
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13010023 - 26 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2084
Abstract
Given the prevalence of mental health issues for both educators and adolescents in rural Montana, this project is designed to help mitigate the impact of stressors by providing coping strategies linked to improvements in overall mental health outcomes for teachers, which may ultimately [...] Read more.
Given the prevalence of mental health issues for both educators and adolescents in rural Montana, this project is designed to help mitigate the impact of stressors by providing coping strategies linked to improvements in overall mental health outcomes for teachers, which may ultimately lead to improved co-regulation of students and classroom climate. The immediate goal of this pilot study was to measure physical and mental health outcomes of educators resulting from a remotely-delivered trauma-informed yoga intervention. Findings suggest improvements in participants’ depression and anxiety levels, trauma symptoms, sleep quality, and non-significant changes in heart rate variability and cortisol levels. Full article
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21 pages, 5111 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Drawings on Representations of COVID-19 among Senior High School Students: Case of the Dakhla-Oued Eddahab Region, Morocco
by Lhoussaine Maskour, Bouchta El Batri, Sidi Mohamed Oubit, Eila Jeronen, Boujemaa Agorram and Rahma Bouali
Educ. Sci. 2022, 12(12), 892; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci12120892 - 05 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1762
Abstract
Since the coronavirus COVID-19 was identified as an international public health emergency in 2020, many studies on the perceptions of students in higher education have been published concerning it. Although young students’ perceptions also influence decision making and actions, their perceptions of COVID-19 [...] Read more.
Since the coronavirus COVID-19 was identified as an international public health emergency in 2020, many studies on the perceptions of students in higher education have been published concerning it. Although young students’ perceptions also influence decision making and actions, their perceptions of COVID-19 have, so far, been little studied. Therefore, to increase knowledge about their understanding of COVID-19, a cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted as a drawing survey in two schools in the Dakhla-Oued Eddahab region, Morocco. The participants were 94 high school students (aged 14–19). The drawings were analyzed by inductive and deductive content analysis. The findings show that the majority of the students knew the archetypal representation of COVID-19. They had a good grasp of the COVID-19, how it spreads, and how to stop it from spreading. Some students were aware of the potential dangers associated with COVID-19. Admittedly, misrepresentations related to fear and unfamiliarity with COVID-19 lead to mental health issues that undermine the key factors in students’ academic success. Younger children’s representations were dominated by magical thinking that reduces COVID-19 to preventive measures. Overall, the results made it possible to deduce that COVID-19 is strongly associated with terms that are both characteristic and socially valued (disease, prevention, barrier measures, etc.) and, conversely, with rather negative terms (fear of dying, anxiety, sadness, helplessness, etc.). The identification of these representations is very useful because they make it possible to apprehend and understand the attitudes and behaviors of these students, which, therefore, implies the need to define the appropriate teaching methods to try to align these behaviors with the behaviors desired. Full article
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