Freshwater Zoobenthos Biodiversity, Evolution and Ecology

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Freshwater Biodiversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2024 | Viewed by 6110

Special Issue Editors

College of Fisheries and Life Science, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 201306, China
Interests: biogeography; entomology; ecology; systematics; eDNA; mitogenome; molecular phylogeny
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023, China
Interests: biodiversity; evolution; molecular phylogeny; phylogeography and conservation of freshwater crabs
State Key Laboratory of Marine Resource Utilization in South China Sea, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China
Interests: global change biology of aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish; functional ecology of aquatic macroinvertebrate and fish; aquatic bioassessment and environmental modeling
College of Life Sciences, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541006, China
Interests: gastropod taxonomy; molecular phylogeny
China National Environmental Monitoring Centre, Beijing 100012, China
Interests: benthic macroinvertebrate; aquatic biology; aquatic ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a forthcoming Special Issue of Diversity focused on freshwater zoobenthos, which is a key indicator group for monitoring environmental change in freshwater ecosystems.

The freshwater zoobenthos consists, mostly, of insect larvae, crustacean, annelids, and molluscs, with >200,000 estimated species in the world. Due to their high species diversity, specialized life cycles, and sensitivity to water environmental changes, freshwater zoobenthos are important biological indicators for monitoring and assessment of freshwater ecosystem health. Many previous studies have achieved considerable progress for diversity, phylogeny, biogeography, evolution, and ecology of freshwater zoobenthos. However, there remains much to be learned in order to improve the understanding of taxonomic groups and their phylogenetic relationships that still remain uncertain.

This Special Issue aims to seek high-quality original submissions that advance our understanding of freshwater zoobenthos biodiversity, evolution, and ecology, including studies in the fields of classic and molecular taxonomy, DNA barcoding, phylogeny (articles with only a single mitochondrial genome and related simple phylogenetic analysis will not be considered), ecology, and biogeography.

Dr. Xiao-Long Lin
Prof. Dr. Hongying Sun
Dr. Kai Chen
Dr. Li-Na Du
Dr. Bing-Jiao Sun
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biogeography
  • DNA barcode
  • ecology
  • evolution
  • genomics
  • phylogeny
  • taxonomy
  • zoobenthos

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

17 pages, 4889 KiB  
Article
Insights into the Gut Microbiota of the Freshwater Crab Sinopotamon planum across Three Seasons and Its Associations with the Surrounding Aquatic Microbiota
Diversity 2023, 15(4), 519; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15040519 - 03 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1119
Abstract
Gut microbiota is closely related to the health of the host and its adaptation to environmental changes. Sinopotamon planum is a species of freshwater crab that lives in the water for three seasons and plays a key role in freshwater ecosystems as a [...] Read more.
Gut microbiota is closely related to the health of the host and its adaptation to environmental changes. Sinopotamon planum is a species of freshwater crab that lives in the water for three seasons and plays a key role in freshwater ecosystems as a benthic macroinvertebrate, an important indicator of aquatic ecological health. In this study, we sequenced 60 gut microbial samples of S. planum and nine microbial samples from the surrounding water in spring, summer, and autumn based on the 16S rRNA gene. The results showed that gut microbiota had the highest alpha diversity in summer, which may be related to increased adaptability in summer. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Bacteroidota were the most dominant phyla of gut microbiota across three seasons, with Candidatus Hepatoplasma and Candidatus Bacilloplasma being the main genera. These main phyla and genera may be key to maintaining a stable function of the intestinal environment. Firmicutes was the phylum with the highest relative abundance, which is probably related to the carnivorous behaviour of S. planum. The abundant C. Hepatoplasma may be related to the starvation of S. planum in the wild. In both gut and water microbiota, beta diversity analyses showed significant differences across seasons. Comparative analysis of gut microbes and surrounding water microbes showed significant differences in microbial diversity and composition between gut and surrounding water. In conclusion, the structure of the gut microbial community of S. planum differed significantly between the studied seasons, but the water microbial community around S. planum was less variable and significantly different from the gut microbes. The seasonal differences in gut microbes are more likely the result of self-internal adaptation to changes in water temperature and food resources between seasons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Freshwater Zoobenthos Biodiversity, Evolution and Ecology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

10 pages, 3157 KiB  
Article
A Checklist of the Caddisflies (Insecta: Trichoptera) from the Middle and Lower Basins of Jinsha River, Southwestern China; Including One New Species and Nine New Records in China
Diversity 2023, 15(2), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15020181 - 28 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1194
Abstract
A checklist of trichopteran species in the middle and lower basins of the Jinsha River (southwestern China) is compiled for the first time. upon collected materials. It recorded ten families, 13 genera, and 23 species were recorded. Among them, the male of a [...] Read more.
A checklist of trichopteran species in the middle and lower basins of the Jinsha River (southwestern China) is compiled for the first time. upon collected materials. It recorded ten families, 13 genera, and 23 species were recorded. Among them, the male of a new species Cheumatopsyche latisecta Ge & Sun, sp. nov., which can be diagnosed by its genitalia, is described and illustrated. In addition, nine other species are recorded for the first time from China, six species and three ones are recorded for the first time for Yunnan and Sichuan provinces, respectively. This trichopteran species list can provide guidance for caddisfly identification of the river and the region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Freshwater Zoobenthos Biodiversity, Evolution and Ecology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1828 KiB  
Article
Genetic Variation and Phylogeography of Lumbriculus variegatus (Annelida: Clitellata: Lumbriculidae) Based on Mitochondrial Genes
Diversity 2023, 15(2), 158; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15020158 - 22 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1763
Abstract
Lumbriculus variegatus is a typical cold-water worm and is mainly distributed in the Tibetan Plateau and Northeast in China. The current study aimed to explore the genetic diversity and phylogeography of L. variegatus sampled from different geographical regions based on concatenated (COI + [...] Read more.
Lumbriculus variegatus is a typical cold-water worm and is mainly distributed in the Tibetan Plateau and Northeast in China. The current study aimed to explore the genetic diversity and phylogeography of L. variegatus sampled from different geographical regions based on concatenated (COI + 16S rRNA, 879 bp) genes. Among 63 L. variegatus specimens, 29 haplotypes were identified with high haplotype diversity (h = 0.923) and nucleotide diversity (π = 0.062). The Bayesian phylogenetic analysis and Median-joining haplotype network revealed two lineages, or species, of L. variegatus. Taxa belonging to lineage I was mainly distributed in the Tibetan Plateau of China, North America, and Sweden, while lineage II composed taxa from Northeast China, southern China, and Sweden. The analysis of molecular variance indicated that the genetic difference was mainly due to differences between lineages. Neutrality tests showed that the overall L. variegatus have a stable population since the time of origin. Divergence time analysis suggested that L. variegatus originated from the Triassic period of Mesozoic in 235 MYA (95%HPD: 199–252 MYA), and the divergence between different lineages of L. variegatus began from the next 170 million years. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Freshwater Zoobenthos Biodiversity, Evolution and Ecology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 6018 KiB  
Article
The Real Characters of Heptagenia ngi Hsu (1936) from China Representing a New Genus (Ephemeroptera: Heptageniidae)
Diversity 2022, 14(12), 1027; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14121027 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 1120
Abstract
A very common and early named mayfly species from China, Heptagenia ngi Hsu, 1936, has no exact descriptions of its imago nor nymph, so its generic status is not clear. Based on detailed re-descriptions and pictures of all its stages from fresh materials, [...] Read more.
A very common and early named mayfly species from China, Heptagenia ngi Hsu, 1936, has no exact descriptions of its imago nor nymph, so its generic status is not clear. Based on detailed re-descriptions and pictures of all its stages from fresh materials, it is transferred into a new genus Maculogenia Zhou, gen. nov. Its nymph has conspicuous pale-dark colored body, slightly concave posterior margin of head, scattered simple setae on ventral maxillae, spines and very fine hair-like setae on caudal filaments. Similarly, its imago also has remarkable dark stripes and dots on the pale body, small median titillators and short first segment of foretarsi, apically expanded penes without any spines. It is similar to the genera Electrogena, Thamnodontus, and Parafronurus but they can be differentiated easily by above selected key structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Freshwater Zoobenthos Biodiversity, Evolution and Ecology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop