Taxonomy, Systematics, Evolution and Biogeography of Freshwater Decapod Crustaceans

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Freshwater Biodiversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2970

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
UMR Biologie des Organismes et Écosystèmes Aquatiques, Sorbonne Université, CEDEX 05, 75231 Paris, France
Interests: integrative taxonomy; conservation; evolution; hydrobiology; freshwater shrimps; Decapoda

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Guest Editor
Museum für Naturkunde - Leibniz Institute for Research on Evolution and Biodiversity Science, Invalidenstr. 43, D-10115 Berlin, Germany
Interests: integrative taxonomy; systematics; evolution; biogeography; conservation; freshwater shrimps

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Decapod crustaceans have successfully colonized a wide range of habitats in freshwaters all around the world, becoming a key component of these ecosystems. The estimated numbers of species are 1,300 for primary freshwater crabs (Brachyura), 2,500 for freshwater anomurans (Aeglidae), 800 for freshwater shrimps (Caridea) and 590 for crayfish (Astacidea). This great taxonomic diversity reflects the diversity of habitats occupied by freshwater decapods, from the lower reaches of rivers to mountain streams through lakes, temporary ponds or underground water bodies. Despite generating a steady interest from scientists for decades, the recent developments of new tools applied to their study led to an increase in the number of new species descriptions, and more and more phylogenies have been published, shedding new light on the evolution of freshwater decapod crustaceans. However, the majority of taxa remains to be discovered regarding the evolutionary history of these taxa, and new species descriptions are still frequent among them. Therefore, this Special Issue will focus on the taxonomy, systematics, evolution and biogeography of freshwater decapod crustaceans.

The scope includes but is not limited to the following fields: taxonomy, phylogeny, evolutionary history, phylogeography and palaeontology. If you are interested in this opportunity or have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Dr. Valentin de Mazancourt
Dr. Kristina von Rintelen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Anomura
  • Astacidea
  • Brachyura
  • Caridea
  • diversity
  • fossil
  • molecular taxonomy
  • morphology
  • new species

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

31 pages, 11130 KiB  
Article
An Integrative Taxonomic Revision of the Freshwater Atyid Shrimps (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea) of Micronesia
by Valentin de Mazancourt, Gérard Marquet and Philippe Keith
Diversity 2024, 16(4), 200; https://doi.org/10.3390/d16040200 - 27 Mar 2024
Viewed by 858
Abstract
Twelve species of atyid shrimps are reported from three Micronesian islands (Babeldaob, Pohnpei, and Guam) and studied using a combined morphological and molecular approach. Among them, three are new records for the area (Caridina appendiculata, Caridina lobocensis, and Caridina rubella [...] Read more.
Twelve species of atyid shrimps are reported from three Micronesian islands (Babeldaob, Pohnpei, and Guam) and studied using a combined morphological and molecular approach. Among them, three are new records for the area (Caridina appendiculata, Caridina lobocensis, and Caridina rubella), while three new species are here described: Atyoida chacei sp. nov., Caridina ponapensis sp. nov., and Caridina rintelenorum sp. nov. Descriptions for these new species, diagnoses for poorly known species, and taxonomic notes are provided herein and their biogeography is discussed. Full article
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17 pages, 2641 KiB  
Article
Non-Native Decapods in South America: Risk Assessment and Potential Impacts
by Lucas Rieger de Oliveira, Gustavo Brito, Mafalda Gama, Ximena María Constanza Ovando, Pedro Anastácio and Simone Jaqueline Cardoso
Diversity 2023, 15(7), 841; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15070841 - 9 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1421
Abstract
Biological invasions pose significant challenges in the Anthropocene, impacting ecosystem biodiversity and functioning. Ecological Niche Modeling is widely used to evaluate potential areas at risk of invasions, aiding in the prevention of invasive-species expansion and guiding conservation efforts in freshwater ecosystems. The main [...] Read more.
Biological invasions pose significant challenges in the Anthropocene, impacting ecosystem biodiversity and functioning. Ecological Niche Modeling is widely used to evaluate potential areas at risk of invasions, aiding in the prevention of invasive-species expansion and guiding conservation efforts in freshwater ecosystems. The main objectives of this study were to model the ecological niche and evaluate remaining suitable habitat areas for the occurrence of five potentially invasive species of freshwater decapods in South America: Dilocarcinus pagei, Macrobrachium amazonicum, M. jelskii, M. rosenbergii, and Procambarus clarkii. Occurrence data from the Global Biodiversity Information Facility were complemented with a literature systematic review. Variables used in the models were obtained from the Worldclim and EarthEv databases. Ecological Niche Modeling was performed using the Biomod2 and sdm package algorithms. Our results indicated a suitable area of up to 11% of South America. Model evaluations yielded favorable TSS and AUC values (>0.7 and >0.8). The suitable areas projected for South America included several hydrographic basins and Protected Areas. The information generated in our study can help identifying areas susceptible to decapod invasion in South America and support local management and decisions. Full article
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