Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction through Water Splitting

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrocatalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 7215

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Koç Üniversitesi, Istanbul, Turkey
Interests: catalysts; boron-based high-tech materials; thermoelectric energy harvesting and cooling; batteries; superconductors; laser crystals; materials displaying unusual properties

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Co-Guest Editor
Koç University Boron and Advanced Materials Application and Research Center (KUBAM), Koç University, Istanbul, Sariyer, Turkey
Interests: electrochemistry; surface engineering; nanomaterials; semiconductors and optical physic; photoelectrochemistry; photoelectrochemical cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The exponential growth in energy consumption and the rapid decline of fossil fuel reserves globally necessitate investigating alternative energy sources. A potential alternative to fossil fuels is hydrogen. However, the industrial production of hydrogen with conventional technologies results in high levels of CO2 emissions and a high level of energy consumption. On the flip side, electrochemical water splitting (EWS) presents a simple and efficient way owing to hydrogen generation directly via electricity and eco-friendly processes.

A successful EWS requires electrocatalysts with high performance and long-term stability to push forward two half-cell reactions efficiently, namely hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) at the cathode and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) at the anode. Different electrocatalysts have been designed for the past few years to reduce required overpotentials and guarantee long-term performance. Meanwhile, there is a need to immediately replace the high-cost state-of-the-art electrocatalysts (e.g., Pt/C and RuO2) with cheaper, more efficient, and more stable ones. The transition metal (TM) sulfides, nitrides, selenides, carbides, phosphates and phosphides, oxides/hydroxides, and borides have come to the forefront as potential candidates due to their high abundance, better stabilities, and favorable electrochemical properties.

The current Special Issue welcomes submitting original research papers and reviews on cost-effective and efficient electrocatalysts for producing clean hydrogen through water splitting. Several factors should be taken into consideration for fabricating a perfect electrocatalyst, including method of synthesis, catalytic performance, cost, and long-term operation. Despite the significant progress being made in this field, the challenges concerning insufficient electrochemical activity, poor durability, and fundamental understanding of mechanisms remain important issues to be tackled. Submissions may cover themes including but not limited to:

  • Developing non-precious (single atom or noble metal-free) electrocatalysts;
  • Designing bifunctional electrocatalysts;
  • Advanced in situ and operando characterization of electrocatalysts;
  • Theory-oriented screening of advanced electrocatalysts;
  • Experimental and/or theoretical studies on the behavior of electrochemical interfaces and catalysis mechanisms.

We sincerely hope this Special Issue will contribute to the global efforts to reach carbon-free, renewable, and sustainable energy production by addressing diverse issues related to “Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction through Water Splitting”.

We look forward to receiving your submission.

Dr. Umut Aydemir
Dr. Naeimeh Sadat Peighambardoust
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • electrocatalysis
  • water splitting
  • hydrogen evolution reaction (HER)
  • green hydrogen production
  • reaction mechanism

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 6164 KiB  
Article
The NiCo Bimetal Catalyst Loaded on Polyvinylidene Fluoride Coated on the Self-Supporting Silk Electrode as an Advanced Electrocatalyst for the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction
by Haoyu Wang, Chunyong Zhang, Zhe Li, Yinpin Wen and Li Shu
Catalysts 2023, 13(6), 987; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13060987 - 9 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1371
Abstract
In this work, a NixCox/Silk-PVDF bimetallic catalyst electrode was prepared for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in hydropower. This cheap, durable, and efficient electrode has good practical application prospects. Green natural silk, which will pollute the environment. The electrodes [...] Read more.
In this work, a NixCox/Silk-PVDF bimetallic catalyst electrode was prepared for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in hydropower. This cheap, durable, and efficient electrode has good practical application prospects. Green natural silk, which will pollute the environment. The electrodes (obtained by varying the Ni:Co ratio and hydrothermal times) were prepared hydrothermally. Ni and Co elements were revealed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Ni2Co2/silk-PVDF was identified as an effective catalyst in 1 M KOH alkaline electrolyte with an overpotential of 89.4 mV at 20 mA cm−2 and a Tafel slope of 47.46 mv dec−1. It showed low resistance and a high specific surface area in EIS and CV tests, respectively, proving its superior HER performance. Finally, the stability and durability of the electrode coated with PVDF were demonstrated via testing at a voltage of −0.1 V over 24 h. This work provides an environmentally friendly and simple method to load metal on a self-supporting electrode to be used in the hydrogen evolution reaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction through Water Splitting)
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10 pages, 784 KiB  
Article
Fabricating Dispersed Fine Silver Nanoparticles on Liquid Substrate for Improved Photocatalytic Water Splitting Efficiency
by Chuhang Zhang
Catalysts 2023, 13(6), 946; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13060946 - 28 May 2023
Viewed by 1121
Abstract
Dispersed silver nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized on a silicone oil substrate under varied substrate temperature T by thermal vaporization method. Scanning electron microscopic investigation demonstrates that the mean size of the NPs are around 7.8 nm with a standard deviation of 1.0 nm. [...] Read more.
Dispersed silver nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized on a silicone oil substrate under varied substrate temperature T by thermal vaporization method. Scanning electron microscopic investigation demonstrates that the mean size of the NPs are around 7.8 nm with a standard deviation of 1.0 nm. The NPs are transferred to a strontium titanate (STO) crystal as co-catalyst for water splitting efficiency test. The photoelectrochmical (PEC) measurement reveals the photocatalytic activity of NP co-catalyst sensitively relies on T during deposition process: the relative current density jr increases from 4.8 μA/cm2 to 25.4 μA/cm2 as T goes up from 253 K to 333 K. However, a slight decrease of jr from 25.4 μA/cm2 to 22.8 μA/cm2 is found as T further increases to 353 K. The dependent behavior of jr on T is explained in term of a competition mechanism between microstructure evolution and growth model of the NPs under different T: for T ranging from 253 K to 333 K, the effect of a higher crystalline structure for NPs fabricated under higher T improves the electron transfer rate from STO to NPs is dominant. As T increases to 353 K, the overlapping of NPs become a factor for photocatalytic activity of NP/STO system: the diffusion distance of electrons becomes larger and the apparent contact area between NPs and STO is reduced which in turn reduce the photocatalytic activity of NP/STO. The experimental method to synthesize NPs in this report may open up a way to further apply fine NPs in enhancing photocatalytic water splitting efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction through Water Splitting)
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15 pages, 4810 KiB  
Article
Tuning Electrochemical Hydrogen-Evolution Activity of CoMoO4 through Zn Incorporation
by Sanaz Chamani, Ebrahim Sadeghi, Ugur Unal, Naeimeh Sadat Peighambardoust and Umut Aydemir
Catalysts 2023, 13(5), 798; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13050798 - 24 Apr 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1536
Abstract
Designing cheap, efficient, and durable electrocatalysts on three-dimensional (3D) substrates such as nickel foam (NF) for the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) is in high demand for the practical application of electrochemical water splitting. In this work, we adopted a simple one-step hydrothermal method to [...] Read more.
Designing cheap, efficient, and durable electrocatalysts on three-dimensional (3D) substrates such as nickel foam (NF) for the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) is in high demand for the practical application of electrochemical water splitting. In this work, we adopted a simple one-step hydrothermal method to realize the incorporation of Zn into the lattice of CoMoO4 with various atomic concentrations—Co1-xZnxMoO4 (x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7). The morphological studies demonstrated that parent CoMoO4 consists of nanoflowers and nanorods. However, as the concentration of Zn increases within the host CoMoO4, the portion of nanoflowers decreases and simultaneously the portion of nanorods increases. Moreover, the substitution of Zn2+ in place of Co2+/Co3+ creates oxygen vacancies in the host structure, especially in the case of Co0.5Zn0.5MoO4, giving rise to lower charge-transfer resistance and a higher electrochemically active surface area. Therefore, among the prepared samples, Co0.5Zn0.5MoO4 on NF showed an improved HER performance, reaching 10 mA cm−2 at an overpotential as low as 204 mV in a 1.0 M KOH medium. Finally, the Co0.5Zn0.5MoO4 electrode exhibited robust long-term stability at an applied current density of 10 mA cm−2 for 20 h. The Faradaic efficiency determined by a gas chromatograph found that the hydrogen-production efficiency varied from 94% to 84%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction through Water Splitting)
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12 pages, 2094 KiB  
Article
PGM-Free Electrocatalytic Layer Characterization by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of an Anion Exchange Membrane Water Electrolyzer with Nafion Ionomer as the Bonding Agent
by Artem S. Pushkarev, Irina V. Pushkareva, Stephanus P. du Preez and Dmitri G. Bessarabov
Catalysts 2023, 13(3), 554; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal13030554 - 9 Mar 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2395
Abstract
Low-cost anion exchange membrane (AEM) water electrolysis is a promising technology for producing “green” high-purity hydrogen using platinum group metal (PGM)-free catalysts. The performance of AEM electrolysis depends on the overall overvoltage, e.g., voltage losses coming from different processes in the water electrolyzer [...] Read more.
Low-cost anion exchange membrane (AEM) water electrolysis is a promising technology for producing “green” high-purity hydrogen using platinum group metal (PGM)-free catalysts. The performance of AEM electrolysis depends on the overall overvoltage, e.g., voltage losses coming from different processes in the water electrolyzer including hydrogen and oxygen evolution, non-faradaic charge transfer resistance, mass transfer limitations, and others. Due to the different relaxation times of these processes, it is possible to unravel them in the frequency domain by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This study relates to solving and quantifying contributions to the total polarization resistance of the AEM water electrolyzer, including ohmic and charge transfer resistances in the kinetically controlled mode. The high-frequency contribution is proposed to have non-faradaic nature, and its conceivable nature and mechanism are discussed. The characteristic frequencies of unraveled contributions are provided to be used as benchmark data for commercially available membranes and electrodes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction through Water Splitting)
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