Plasma Medicine Technologies: Volume II

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 6799

Special Issue Editors

Department of Electrical and Biological Physics, Plasma Bioscience Research Center, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897, Republic of Korea
Interests: atmospheric pressure plasma; plasma physics; reactive oxygen species; reactive nitrogen species
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ZIK Plasmatis, Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald, Germany
Interests: redox medicine; immunology; cancer; cold physical plasma; reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; redox signaling
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Prof. Dr. Hiromasa Tanaka
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Guest Editor
Plasma Medical Science Global Innovation Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan
Interests: plasma medicine
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Department of Chemistry, Antwarp University, Antwerpen, Belgium
Interests: plasma medicine; cancer biology; immune-modulation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, entitled “Plasma Medicine Technologies”, aims to cover all the latest outstanding developments of plasma bioscience and medicine. This Special Issue will describe recent research and developments in the field of plasma medicine. Plasma medicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines the principles of plasma physics, material science, bioscience, and medicine towards the development of therapeutic strategies. The study of plasma medicine has yielded the development of new treatment opportunities in medical and dental sciences. The objective of this Special Issue is to present some research underlying new therapeutic methods useful in medicine, dentistry, sterilization, and, in the current scenario, challenges and perspectives in biomedical sciences. This issue will focus on basic studies on the characterization of bioplasma sources applicable to living cells, especially to the human body, and fundamental research on mutual intreactions between the bioplasma and organic–inorganic, liquids and bio- or nanomaterials. The knowledge that has arisen from studies in the plasma medicine area may translate into new innovations to treat patients in daily clinics.

Prof. Dr. Nagendra Kumar Kaushik
Prof. Dr. Eun Ha Choi
Dr. Sander Bekeschus
Prof. Dr. Hiromasa Tanaka
Dr. Abraham Lin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • plasma medicine
  • cold plasma
  • plasma physics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 3019 KiB  
Article
Effects of Cold Plasma Treatment on Physical Modification and Endogenous Hormone Regulation in Enhancing Seed Germination and Radicle Growth of Mung Bean
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(20), 10308; https://doi.org/10.3390/app122010308 - 13 Oct 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1732
Abstract
This study investigated the effects of plasma duration and different reactive species ratios of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment on both physical and endogenous hormone changes in enhancing the germination and growth of mung bean seeds. Seed germination and sprout stem length were significantly [...] Read more.
This study investigated the effects of plasma duration and different reactive species ratios of cold atmospheric-pressure plasma treatment on both physical and endogenous hormone changes in enhancing the germination and growth of mung bean seeds. Seed germination and sprout stem length were significantly enhanced after plasma treatment. The germination rate increased eleven times after 12 h, while the radicles’ length increased ~3 times after 96 h with optimal plasma treatment parameters. SEM images showed that the plasmas directly induced gradual changes in the seed coating, including deformed and shrunken epidermis, and cracks with sizes varying from 0.2 to 1.5 µm after 4 min of plasma treatment. Water contact angle was reduced from 73° with untreated seed to almost 0° with 4 min treated seed. These effects could lead to better water absorption on the surface of treated seeds. We found that a plasma energy dosage of 0.08 Wh per seed and NO concentration between 20–95 ppm were the optimal enhancement conditions. We also showed that, for the first time, through delicate extraction, separation, and quantification processes, NO-induced upregulation of the natural growth hormone gibberellic acid could be the dominant phytochemistry pathway responsible for the enhancement effect. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine Technologies: Volume II)
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15 pages, 22543 KiB  
Article
Enhancing Antioxidant Activities and Anti-Aging Effect of Rice Stem Cell Extracts by Plasma Treatment
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(6), 2903; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12062903 - 11 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2483
Abstract
Plant-derived substances exhibit antioxidant and antibacterial activities and have been proven to have beneficial effects in wound healing and skin regeneration. Plant stem cells have recently received much attention as research materials in cosmetic development because they promote regeneration after damage. In this [...] Read more.
Plant-derived substances exhibit antioxidant and antibacterial activities and have been proven to have beneficial effects in wound healing and skin regeneration. Plant stem cells have recently received much attention as research materials in cosmetic development because they promote regeneration after damage. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time that the plasma treatment of stem cells obtained from rice-seed embryos can be effective in enhancing antioxidant activity and in regenerating human skin. We investigated this potential utilizing micro-DBD (Dielectric Barrier Discharge) plasma as a pretreatment technique to enhance the vitality and functional activity of rice stem cells. The results of the cell culture experiments show that plasma-treated rice stem cell extracts (RSCE) have promising antioxidant and anti-skin aging activities. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) for major antioxidant enzymes and anti-aging genes confirm that the plasma technique used in the pretreatment of RSCE was able to enhance cell activities in skin regeneration, including cell survival, proliferation, and collagen enhancement for Human Fibroblast (HFB) degraded by oxidative stress. These results show that the relatively low energy of less than 300 W and an amount of NOx-based reactive nitrogen species (RNS) from plasma discharge of about 3 μL/L were the key factors and that RSCE, of which the antioxidant activity was enhanced by plasma treatment, appeared to be a major contributor to the protective effect of HFB against oxidative stress. Plasma-treated RSCE induced excellent anti-aging properties by stimulating HFB to promote collagen synthesis, thereby promoting skin regeneration. These properties can protect the skin from various oxidative stresses. This study demonstrates that plasma-treated extracts of stem cells derived from rice-seed embryos have an excellent regenerative effect on aging-treated HFB. Our results demonstrate the potential utility of plasma-treated RSCE as a skin anti-aging agent in cosmeceutical formulations for the first time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine Technologies: Volume II)
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Review

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17 pages, 2328 KiB  
Review
Medical Gas Plasma—A Potent ROS-Generating Technology for Managing Intraoperative Bleeding Complications
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(8), 3800; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12083800 - 09 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1737
Abstract
Cold medical gas plasmas are under pre-clinical investigation concerning their hemostatic activity and could be applied for intra-operative bleeding control in the future. The technological leap innovation was their generation at body temperature, thereby causing no thermal harm to the tissue and ensuring [...] Read more.
Cold medical gas plasmas are under pre-clinical investigation concerning their hemostatic activity and could be applied for intra-operative bleeding control in the future. The technological leap innovation was their generation at body temperature, thereby causing no thermal harm to the tissue and ensuring tissue integrity. This directly contrasts with current techniques such as electrocautery, which induces hemostasis by carbonizing the tissue using a heated electrode. However, the necrotized tissue is prone to fall, raising the risk of post-operative complications such as secondary bleedings or infection. In recent years, various studies have reported on the ability of medical gas plasmas to induce blood coagulation, including several suggestions concerning their mode of action. As non-invasive and gentle hemostatic agents, medical gas plasmas could be particularly eligible for vulnerable tissues, e.g., colorectal surgery and neurosurgery. Further, their usage could be beneficial regarding the prevention of post-operative bleedings due to the absence or sloughing of eschar. However, no clinical trials or individual healing attempts for medical gas plasmas have been reported to pave the way for clinical approvement until now, despite promising results in experimental animal models. In this light, the present mini-review aims to emphasize the potential of medical gas plasmas to serve as a hemostatic agent in clinical procedures. Providing a detailed overview of the current state of knowledge, feasible application fields are discussed, and possible obstacles are addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasma Medicine Technologies: Volume II)
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