Progress in 3OM: Opto-Mechatronics, Opto-Mechanics, and Optical Metrology

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Physics General".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 6161

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. 3OM Optomechatronics Group, Faculty of Engineering, Aurel Vlaicu University of Arad, 310130 Arad, Romania
2. Doctoral School, Polytechnic University of Timisoara, 300006 Timisoara, Romania
Interests: optomechatronics; laser systems; biomedical imaging; optical coherence tomography (OCT); measuring systems; optical metrology; materials study; biomaterials characterization
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Guest Editor
The Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA
Interests: optical design; optical systems; freeform optics; biomedical imaging; optical coherence tomography (OCT); Non-Destructive Testing (NDT); optical metrology

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Guest Editor
Applied Optics Group, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NH, UK
Interests: photonics; laser systems; imaging techniques; optical coherence tomography (OCT); biomedical imaging; optical metrology; materials studies; Non-Destructive Testing (NDT)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is based on the 3OM concept, which unites three related domains:

(1) Opto-Mechatronics is a blend of optics & photonics, precision mechanics, electronics, control & automation, as well as IT.

(2) Opto-Mechanics usually fills the gap between the high requirements of optical design and the capabilities of mechanical technologies, addressing tolerances, errors, positioning issues, and methods to tackle them. Kinematic and dynamic aspects of optical systems with moving parts are also approached, and this leads back to control & automation, but also to material issues, involving for example Finite Element Analysis (FEA).

(3) Optical Metrology is a large umbrella of applications that benefits from both domains above, and includes fields as diverse as industrial measurements (e.g., Non-Destructive Testing (NDT)), biomedical imaging (with a range of techniques, for example Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) or photo-acoustics), remote sensing, as well as security & defence.

The aim of this Special Issue encompasses all these three domains united under the 3OM concept. Analytical approaches, simulations, and/or experiments of optical and laser devices and systems, their optimization and inclusion in applications such as the above are proposed topics. Other fields that apply 3OM are also included, for example laser manufacturing and robotics, as well as lasers in medicine.

While this forum is open to all researchers in these fields, it also provides a selection of papers presented at the 1st International Conference ‘Advances in 3OM: Opto-Mechatronics, Opto-Mechanics, and Optical Metrology’ (Timisoara, Romania), organized in celebration of 100 years of the Polytechnic University of Timisoara, but also of 60 years of lasers and of the International Day of Light (IDL).

All types of contributions, i.e., research papers, reviews, and communications are welcome.

Prof. Virgil-Florin Duma
Prof. Jannick P. Rolland
Prof. Adrian Gh. Podoleanu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Opto-Mechatronics
  • Laser Scanners
  • Optical Devices
  • Optical Design
  • Opto-Mechanics
  • Finite Element Analysis (FEA)
  • Optical Metrology
  • Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT)
  • Photo-acoustics
  • Biomedical Imaging
  • Non-Destructive Testing (NDT)
  • Biomaterials and Material Studies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

32 pages, 6419 KiB  
Article
Optomechanical Analysis and Design of Polygon Mirror-Based Laser Scanners
by Virgil-Florin Duma and Maria-Alexandra Duma
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(11), 5592; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12115592 - 31 May 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3069
Abstract
Polygon Mirror (PM)-based scanning heads are one of the fastest and most versatile optomechanical laser scanners. The aim of this work is to develop a multi-parameter opto-mechanical analysis of PMs, from which to extract rules-of-thumbs for the design of such systems. The characteristic [...] Read more.
Polygon Mirror (PM)-based scanning heads are one of the fastest and most versatile optomechanical laser scanners. The aim of this work is to develop a multi-parameter opto-mechanical analysis of PMs, from which to extract rules-of-thumbs for the design of such systems. The characteristic functions and parameters of PMs scanning heads are deduced and studied, considering their constructive and functional parameters. Optical aspects related to the kinematics of emergent laser beams (and of corresponding laser spots on a scanned plane or objective lens) are investigated. The PM analysis (which implies a larger number of parameters) is confronted with the corresponding, but less complex aspects of Galvanometer Scanners (GSs). The issue of the non-linearity of the scanning functions of both PMs and GSs (and, consequently, of their variable scanning velocities) is approached, as well as characteristic angles, the angular and linear Field-of-View (FOV), and the duty cycle. A device with two supplemental mirrors is proposed and designed to increase the distance between the GS or PM and the scanned plane or lens to linearize the scanning function (and thus to achieve an approximately constant scanning velocity). These optical aspects are completed with Finite Element Analyses (FEA) of fast rotational PMs, to assess their structural integrity issues. The study is concluded with an optomechanical design scheme of PM-based scanning heads, which unites optical and mechanical aspects—to allow for a more comprehensive approach of possible issues of such scanners. Such a scheme can be applied to other types of optomechanical scanners, with mirrors or refractive elements, as well. Full article
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12 pages, 1830 KiB  
Article
Rotational Shearing Interferometer in Detection of the Super-Earth Exoplanets
by Marija Strojnik
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(6), 2840; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12062840 - 10 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1477
Abstract
The astronomers and the general population are fascinated with the problem of exoplanet detection. By far the largest number of detected planets are the so-called Super Earths, relatively cold planets orbiting a large, red giant star, with diameters up to 1 AU, most [...] Read more.
The astronomers and the general population are fascinated with the problem of exoplanet detection. By far the largest number of detected planets are the so-called Super Earths, relatively cold planets orbiting a large, red giant star, with diameters up to 1 AU, most of them at about one hundred light-year distance from us. A rotational shearing interferometer (RSI) was proposed for exoplanet detection. Here the detection capabilities of the RSI are expanded to include the case when the interferometer is not precisely aligned on the star. The theoretical analysis is applied to the case of a Super Earth with the red giant star, displaced from the origin to the Mercury, Earth, and the Martian orbit. For errors in alignment up to the Mercury orbit, the red giant star generates a slanted radiance pattern that may be eliminated using information processing. For larger distances, analysis in the Fourier domain is feasible. Full article
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