Sustainability in Asphalt Pavement and Road Construction

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Civil Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2104

Special Issue Editors

1. Unit Mobility and Built Environment, Department of Building Materials and Structure, Netherlands Organization for Applied Research (TNO), Molengraaffsingel 8, 2629 JD Delft, The Netherlands
2. Department of Materials, Mechanics, Management & Design (3Md), Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, Microlab, Stevinweg 1, 2628 CN Delft, The Netherlands
Interests: self-healing technology for asphalt pavements; innovative solutions for asphalt pavement design; sustainable asphalt technologies and asphalt recycling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 6, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia
Interests: pavement design; pavement management system; road design; application of waste materials in pavement structures; information systems and pavement maintenance; road materials; asphalt mixtures; sustainability materials for roads; destructive and non-destructive testing of pavements; innovative technologies in pavement structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Researchers are invited to submit their contributions to this Special Issue of "Sustainability in Asphalt Pavement and Road Construction" in the MPDI journal of Applied Sciences.

Road infrastructure is very important for the economy of a country, and therefore, attention should be paid to its sustainability. Sustainability should be key both in the construction of new infrastructure, such as the use of materials that will have a positive impact on the environment and economy, and during the reconstruction of existing infrastructure using recycling methods.

Nowadays, the methods of recycling pavement structures are increasingly being used. Certain types of waste and bio-materials are also used in order to construct roads at a lower price and with a reduction in the negative impact on the environment. Additionally, special additives and methods of production and construction are used in asphalt mixtures to obtain self-healing asphalts. Special methods of production and installation of asphalt are also being developed, contributing to the improvement of the quality of asphalt mixtures and road construction. Certain methods, such as the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA), are used to better predict economic costs and environmental impacts.

Topics of this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • Asphalt pavement recycling mixtures;
  • The use of bio- and waste materials in pavement structures;
  • Innovative methods for the production and installation of asphalt mixtures;
  • Self-healing binders and asphalt mixtures. 

In addition to the mentioned possible topics, it is also possible for scientific and practical achievements to be made in the area of the sustainability of asphalt pavements. The goal of this Special Issue is to share original scientific research, as well as review papers, in terms of testing, innovative materials, with researchers and colleagues around the world.

Dr. Amir Tabakovic
Dr. Milan Marinković
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainability
  • asphalt recycling
  • bio-binders
  • bio-rejuvenators
  • bio-polymer modifiers
  • asphalt and waste materials
  • self-healing systems for asphalt pavements
  • lifecycle analysis
  • life cycle cost analysis
  • building information management systems
  • digital twin

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 6096 KiB  
Article
Laboratory Study of Asphalt Concrete for Base Course with Reclaimed Asphalt, Recycling Agents, and Jute Fibres
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(1), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14010239 - 27 Dec 2023
Viewed by 461
Abstract
The way we treat materials after their lifespan is changing. We are finding a new, more effective way to deal with waste: using it, rather than depositing it in landfills. Since bitumen mixtures are the most popular paving materials by far, and their [...] Read more.
The way we treat materials after their lifespan is changing. We are finding a new, more effective way to deal with waste: using it, rather than depositing it in landfills. Since bitumen mixtures are the most popular paving materials by far, and their lifespan is limited, there is a constant availability of old asphalt pavement or reclaimed asphalt (RA). To restore the aged binder properties, we can use recycling agents. In this study, two commercialized biobased recycling agents were used. Furthermore, jute fibers were used as a reinforcement. The influence of the different fiber content and fiber length was investigated in mixtures without the recycling agents. In addition, alkali-treated fibers were used in some mixes for better fiber compatibility with the bitumen matrix. Air voids content, moisture, freeze–thaw susceptibility, stiffness modulus (IT-CY), resistance to crack propagation, and complex modulus tests were conducted. The addition of recycling agents led to a decrease in stiffness. A lower indirect tensile strength ratio (ITSR), increased stiffness, and best crack propagation results were recorded in some mixtures with fibers and recycling agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Asphalt Pavement and Road Construction)
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24 pages, 6883 KiB  
Article
Thermal-Mechanical Behaviour of Road-Embedded Wireless Charging Pads for EVs
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(23), 12766; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132312766 - 28 Nov 2023
Viewed by 513
Abstract
Road-embedded inductive power transfer (IPT) systems have the potential to accelerate the electrification of the transportation sector. For these systems to be economically viable, however, they need to have a similar durability and lifespan to those of asphalt roads. One area that has [...] Read more.
Road-embedded inductive power transfer (IPT) systems have the potential to accelerate the electrification of the transportation sector. For these systems to be economically viable, however, they need to have a similar durability and lifespan to those of asphalt roads. One area that has lacked investigation is thermally induced stresses in a primary IPT pad, which are caused by the increase in the temperature of the pad when it is energized and the differing thermal expansion of the materials within. This paper presents an experimental and a finite element-based methodology for investigating the thermal–mechanical behaviour of a ¼-scale double-D pad, which was energized while suspended in air, as well as energized when embedded in pavement. A focus was placed on the measurement and prediction of strains in the magnetic ferrite cores because of their brittleness. Ferrite strains were measured using a combination of resistive strain gauges and non-metallic fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. Coupled electromagnetic–thermal–structural simulations were conducted to predict temperature and strains in the system, with temperature-dependent properties obtained through physical testing. At an ambient temperature of 50 °C, the temperature in the middle of the copper litz wire coil was predicted to be 100 °C in both the suspended and embedded case. There was an excellent correlation with the experimental results, with a difference of less than 10% for most temperature measurements. When energized, the pad was predicted to experience an upward bow due to its temperature rise, resulting in bending strains in the ferrite cores. At an ambient temperature of 50 °C, the maximum tensile strain in the ferrites of the embedded pad was measured to be 62 microstrains (με), with a root-mean square error that was 18 με across three sensors. The experimental and validated numerical methodology can be applied to full-scale operational IPT pads to analyse and improve their thermal–mechanical performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Asphalt Pavement and Road Construction)
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13 pages, 4835 KiB  
Article
Numerical Modelling Study of Subsurface Drainage of Permeable Friction Course Considering Road Geometric Designs
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(22), 12428; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132212428 - 17 Nov 2023
Viewed by 402
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the subsurface drainage of a permeable friction course (PFC) via two-dimensional finite element analysis. To achieve the scope, PFCs with equivalent water flow paths of length values of 10, 15, 20, and 30 m and slope values of [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the subsurface drainage of a permeable friction course (PFC) via two-dimensional finite element analysis. To achieve the scope, PFCs with equivalent water flow paths of length values of 10, 15, 20, and 30 m and slope values of 0.5%, 2%, 4%, 6%, and 8% were modelled based on FEniCS and implemented entirely in Python programing language to extract the time for surface ponding according to a range of rainfall intensities. The results show that when the rainfall intensity and the length of equivalent water flow path of the PFC rose, the time for surface ponding decreased. For instance, with a rainfall intensity of 10 mm/h and a slope of 0.5%, when the length of equivalent water flow path increased by 20 m, the time for surface ponding dropped by 21 min. Moreover, when the slope of the equivalent water flow path and the thickness of the PFC increased, the time for surface ponding increased. For instance, with a rainfall intensity of 10 mm/h, and a PFC with an equivalent length of 10 m, when the slope increased by 16 times, the time for surface ponding increased more than two times. The current study highlights that the thickness of the PFC has the most influence on subsurface drainage. The findings of this study indicate that at high rainfall intensities, the subsurface drainage of a PFC is not sensitive to its geometric design. Further experimental investigations are needed to evaluate and validate the subsurface drainage of a PFC considering permeability, rutting, and environmental factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability in Asphalt Pavement and Road Construction)
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